Author Topic: How do you like the new paint on Water Shed?  (Read 2181 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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How do you like the new paint on Water Shed?
« on: January 25, 2009, 07:45:59 PM »
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How do you like the new paint on Water Shed? has been converted from the pre-July 2008 WW&F Discussion Forum.
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Dave Olszewski wrote:
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Hi Everyone,

Yesterday I painted Yarmouth Blue on upper Water Shed's North and South Wall. Today I painted Evergreen at bottom of both wall and second coat on door there. See photo at Nerail Photo. The door would look better if it have primer coat. I think Steward painted green paint on barewood.

Also I painted second coat inside Fuel Shed's door from little leftover paint. I glad it was not hot sunny there. It was no fun to paint when it was hot sunny because it can burn green wet paint. I never know when will I paint East Wall. It will depend on the weather. Maybe not until Spring. 

I glad painting on North and South Wall are done before cold Fall and Winter come.

Dave

Mike Fox replied:
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Looking good Dave. Keep it up. See you Saturday.
Mike

Jeff Patelski replied:
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Hi! New member here...

Any idea what brand paints the "Yarmouth Blue" and "Evergreen" are? I'm planning on painting my house in official WW&F colors.

Thanks,
Jeff

Dave Buczkowski replied:
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Jeff;
Welcome aboard. If memory serves it's Benjamin Moore though you should wait to buy the paint until Stewart chimes in to confirm as he is our Palette Master. I'm more concerned that you're painting your house these colors. Usually the disease starts with using Sheepscot as your password and missing class reunions and family events on Track Laying Weekends. Yours sounds like an advanced case of twofootitis. I would have that checked out before you end up like the rest of us...
Dave

Wayne Laepple replied:
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I've heard that doses of Vitamin Y can help the condition.

Dave Buczkowski replied:
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Large quantities taken with fellow sufferers does seem to ease things along a bit. Thanks for your sage advice Dr. L.

Jeff Patelski replied:
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If this is an illness, I don't want to know the cure! No doubt the illness is in advanced stages due to a childhood spent attending Edaville's famous Railfan Days. Add in some newly installed vinyl windows for my house in white which don't match my house's current paint sceme, a trip to Maine during the big convention this year to see the two footers in person and a completely understanding wife...

Thanks for the welcome. Looking forward to my first track laying weekend!

Mike Fox replied:
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Painting is OK Jeff. I was thinking of building my house to resemble a station. I have yet to pick one out but somehow I think Sheepscot is too small. Might have to research that a bit before I start building. Look forward to meeting you anytime at the WW&F. Come on up anytime. No need to wait for a work weekend. Always something going on.
Mike

Dave Olszewski replied:
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Jeff;
Welcome aboard. If memory serves it's Benjamin Moore though you should wait to buy the paint until Stewart chimes in to confirm as he is our Palette Master. I'm more concerned that you're painting your house these colors. Usually the disease starts with using Sheepscot as your password and missing class reunions and family events on Track Laying Weekends. Yours sounds like an advanced case of twofootitis. I would have that checked out before you end up like the rest of us...
Dave

It is correct. It is Benjamin Moore. It is best not to paint Evergreen in hot sunny because it can burn and have bubbles.  I had trouble paint during hot sunny because paint was burned and peel on inside fuel shed door. I painted it again last Sunday. Now it look better. I can't wait to finish with painting two other walls (East and West Wall). Maybe next Spring. I expect cold weather is coming and may have shower this weekend.

Welcome Jeff to WW&F Railway.
Dave

ETSRRCo replied:
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LOL!!! I love it! That is an awsome movie by the way.
"Thats the way boy. Great big letters!"


_________________
Eric Bolton
East Tigard & Southern Railroad Co 1889-1958

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Hi Dave O. Here's a bit of info;  When painting wooden doors it is not wise to use a light colored primer coat.  Doors get much wear around the hardware, locks and hasps.  A light colored under coat will appear as the top coat wears thin giving the door an unkept look.  The carpenters of 100 years ago used the top coat paint as the base coat by thinning the paint.  The first application was applied in a thin coat which soaked into the wood's grain.  A second (un-thinned) coat was later applied to seal the door.  By doing that, the color remained consistant as the door weathered. That is why the water tank doors were painted as they are.

You are right about the Benjamin Moore "Evergreen" color.  It does soak up the sunlight.  I've always tried to paint on the shaded side of the structure to avoid the over heating of the paint which expands air pockets, making those darn bubbles.

I enjoy painting the structures and rolling stock on the WW&F.  It's rewarding to have visitors photographing a car or building because it is in fresh paint.

Dave Olszewski replied:
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Hi Dave O. Here's a bit of info;  When painting wooden doors it is not wise to use a light colored primer coat.  Doors get much wear around the hardware, locks and hasps.  A light colored under coat will appear as the top coat wears thin giving the door an unkept look.  The carpenters of 100 years ago used the top coat paint as the base coat by thinning the paint.  The first application was applied in a thin coat which soaked into the wood's grain.  A second (un-thinned) coat was later applied to seal the door.  By doing that, the color remained consistant as the door weathered. That is why the water tank doors were painted as they are.

You are right about the Benjamin Moore "Evergreen" color.  It does soak up the sunlight.  I've always tried to paint on the shaded side of the structure to avoid the over heating of the paint which expands air pockets, making those darn bubbles.

I enjoy painting the structures and rolling stock on the WW&F.  It's rewarding to have visitors photographing a car or building because it is in fresh paint.

Hi Steward,

The paint on trim and shingles look shine but the door look flat because trim and shingles has primer.  Also there some spill from primer and blue paint on it so I paint it again and hope it look shine like trim. I hate to paint  green during hot sunlight. I remember I painted galley on boat in cold Spring. Next day it look like cloudy. It was mixed shine and flat. So they have me repaint it again and look better. It is going to be cold soon so I may not paint it again until Spring. It may be frost tonight. I glad I put all can of paint and primer back to shop and station from fuel shed so they won't be frozen.

I wish painting on water shed should be done by now. I heard last Spring that it would be done in July. But it was postponed. I hope it will be done before  next Memorial Weekend. I glad painting on fuel shed and pump shed are all done.

Dave

Stephen Hussar replied:
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Looks GREAT, Dave...thanks for posting the link!

Dana Deering replied:
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Dave,

You've done a great job doing all that painting.  The fuel shed looks great and the water tower is looking better all the time.  Painting takes a lot of patience and my hat is off to you, Stewart, and the rest of the WW&F painting crew.  Glad you liked my contribution to the water tank, Eric, I couldn't resist!  "There's only one bo's got the stuff to try me, and you ain't even on the list!"

Emporer of the North Pole is one of the two best films ever made, in my opinion.

Dana

Jeff Patelski replied:
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Thanks, everyone, for the help and advice.

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Dave O,  Yes the water tank doors had a flat finish because I only applied one thinned coat of paint.  I didn't have time for a second coat because it took longer to build the doors than I expected.  I built both doors in bay 2 during N.G. convention week.  The shop was open and there were hundreds of visitors so I spent alot of time talking and showing them around.  The experience was great but delayed the door project a day or two.  I wanted to get the doors built so the building could be closed up before I left at the end of the week.  BTW - The hasp plate on the south door is hand forged.  It came from an old barn that was dismantled in the 1960's (at the time the barn was about 100 years old).  I bought a box of hand forged hinges at an auction when I was a kid and the hasp plate was in the box.  It sat in my basement for over 40 years and then I brought it up for the water tank.  I showed it to Vern and he got a big smile.  He said "That's a nice one, can I make a staple for it"?  I told him yes and he made a real nice staple for the hasp to catch.  I installed the hasp and put a WW&F switch lock on the frame to lock it.  It was common practice on shortline and narrow gauge railroads to use switch locks on section houses, tool houses and other support buildings.   It's the kind of thing the original WW&F would have done if there was a need to lock that type of building.

Dave Olszewski replied:
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Dave O,  Yes the water tank doors had a flat finish because I only applied one thinned coat of paint.  I didn't have time for a second coat because it took longer to build the doors than I expected.  I built both doors in bay 2 during N.G. convention week.  The shop was open and there were hundreds of visitors so I spent alot of time talking and showing them around.  The experience was great but delayed the door project a day or two.  I wanted to get the doors built so the building could be closed up before I left at the end of the week.  BTW - The hasp plate on the south door is hand forged.  It came from an old barn that was dismantled in the 1960's (at the time the barn was about 100 years old).  I bought a box of hand forged hinges at an auction when I was a kid and the hasp plate was in the box.  It sat in my basement for over 40 years and then I brought it up for the water tank.  I showed it to Vern and he got a big smile.  He said "That's a nice one, can I make a staple for it"?  I told him yes and he made a real nice staple for the hasp to catch.  I installed the hasp and put a WW&F switch lock on the frame to lock it.  It was common practice on shortline and narrow gauge railroads to use switch locks on section houses, tool houses and other support buildings.   It's the kind of thing the original WW&F would have done if there was a need to lock that type of building.

Hi Steward,
I like that old knob you put on door there. Now door can't be close. It need trim.  It is fine that you did not have time for second paint there. It was good that you did not paint second coat on it because of spill from primer from wall and blue paint so you do not have to paint third coat. I alway start to paint on roof first, then on wall second then trim and door third. How often do you work at musuem? I work there almost every weekend. But I may not work there often in Winter unless they have something to do with house or inside shop.

Dave

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Dave,  I come up 5 - 6 times a year and have been doing so for a while.  My first painting project was the new caboose in May of 1998.  I spent over a week binzing over the knots, painting primer and top coats on the car.  There were no cupola seats or cabinet inside so I binzed the whole inside of the car.  The following weekend we put together an all WW&F train setting engine 9, flat 118, box 309 and the new 320 on the main line.  320 was riding on shop trucks.  Dana was the brakeman on top of 309. There was a photo of this train in one of the newsletters that year.

I painter 320 again during the N.G. convention.  This time I painted all the iron parts as well as the car body.  Some of the convention guests chartered a special freight train to take photos at Alna Center.  They told me that it was one of the nicest narrow gauge trains they had even seen.

Dave Olszewski replied:
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Hi Steward,

The caboose looks great with new paint. I glad to hear that many people telling you that the train are nice there. I glad we work hard and make musuem look better. Did you know that Ash Man (Bob) painted white inside coach car #3. I was surprised to see new paint when I ride there. I asked him who paint it. He told me he did it. I hope we will fix the opened coach car roof to stop leak then we will paint inside. It is awful inside there. I painted primer at bottom wall to hide the plywood with printing logos.
Ash Man and I were talking about paint station in future. I told him I would like to paint the  barewood pine wall  inside platform to hide dirty and mold execpt oak door. Also bench need new paint Not many people sit on it there.  I told him I will wait until I finish with painting on water shed first.

Will you be at museum this weekend and check the door on East Wall? It need trim so it would close tight. Right now we can't lock it.

Dave

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Dave,  I just got back from Maine.  You guys did a great job on painting the water tank!  I spent some time Tueday fixing the doors and both work properly now.

Stewart Rhine replied:
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I recently purchased an old (enamel shade) outdoor light fixture.  I plan to restore it for use on the water tank building.  It is similar to the ones I put on the freight shed and north end of the shop to light the yard.  The shade and fixture are in good shape, there's a patent date of 1911 on the top casting.   I do not have the arm so I need a piece of 1/2" i.d. steel pipe about 7' long with one end bent into the goose neck shape to hold the light.  I can get the pipe but I do not have a pipe bender for steel galvanized pipe.  I will be figuring up dimensions for the arch.  I hope to bring the light up to the railroad in the Spring.  If I get the pipe made and painted I will install it on the northwest corner of the water tank so it can be connected when the building is wired.

If anyone has an arched piece of pipe or a pipe bender that I can use let me know.

p.s. If anyone has books on the EBT, look at the light on the Mt. Union water tank, my shade looks just like it.

Ira Schreiber replied:
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I bet our resident plumber, Zack Wiley, would have a pipe bender

Dave Crow replied:
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Stewart,
Ed Amrhein at BSM is a plumber and has all of sorts of pipe benders.  He is there virtually every Saturday and a lot of Sundays as well.  If you know when you are able to get down there, or failing that, get me the pipe and a dimensional sketch and I'll get it done for you.
Dave Crow

Dave Olszewski replied:
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Hi Stewart,

I think Zack has pipe bender. Maybe Fireman, Josh R. has it. It is good to see  new old fashion light fixture outside. I haven't seen museum since Holloween Event. I will go there this Sat or next Sat after work.

Dave

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Dave C, Thanks for the info.  I know who Ed is and will call the BSM Saturday to see what he thinks.  Zack does not have a bender for steel pipe but Josh R. should have one.   The thought now is to get the pipe made in Maryland so I can assemble, wire and paint the light in my shop.  That would save steps in Maine.

Dave O,  The other two goose neck lights came off a PRR freight house in PA about 20 years ago.  Both were complete and original.  They look good on the freight house and shop.  My interest is in railroad hardware - lanterns, signals and light fixtures.  I enjoy saving an old light and putting it on our WW&F buildings.  It makes everything look authentic.
Ed Lecuyer
Moderator, WW&F Forum