Author Topic: Article on young MNG management  (Read 4148 times)

James Patten

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Article on young MNG management
« on: May 09, 2023, 01:41:20 PM »
Here's an article in the Bangor Daily News about MNG's young management: https://news.google.com/articles/CBMic2h0dHBzOi8vd3d3LmJhbmdvcmRhaWx5bmV3cy5jb20vMjAyMy8wNS8wOC9uZXdzL3BvcnRsYW5kL21haW5lLW5hcnJvdy1nYXVnZS1yYWlscm9hZC15b3VuZy1zdGFmZi10cmFpbnMtam9hbTQwemswdy_SAQA?hl=en-US&gl=US&ceid=US%3Aen

You get a few seconds of the article before the BDN tries to get you sign up/pay for seeing it.  I had to constantly refresh the page in order to read the article.

Graham Buxton

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2023, 03:04:49 PM »
You get a few seconds of the article before the BDN tries to get you sign up/pay for seeing it.  I had to constantly refresh the page in order to read the article.


I'd say they have you pegged as hopeless in terms of getting you to subscribe.  ;D My guess is you are a frequent visitor to their site.


On the other hand, I can't recall visiting their site previously, and had no issue reading the entire article unmolested.

There is some possibility that you can read the whole article by coming in from this site: https://ground.news/article/meet-the-young-folks-preserving-maines-oldest-trains


Another technique you can try is to open a Private Window (using Chrome its Control-Shift-N, other browsers may have different key sequences, but typically have similar function), then search for the exact article title:
Meet the young folks preserving Maine’s oldest trains



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Here is interesting snippet about "Community engagement"  from near the end the article:
Quote
Community engagement is not really something we’ve ever focused on before,” said the railroad’s development specialist, 29-year-old Elizabeth Hansen. “And this year, we’ve been really working on partnering with other nonprofits and community groups to grow what we’re doing.”

Recently, during Earth Week, Hansen said the railroad partnered with Portland Parks Conservancy to remove invasive plants along the Eastern Prom. She also has other collaborations in mind and hopes to work with the Portland Sea Dogs and the Children’s Museum of Maine this year, among others.

“This used to be a little bit of a club and now we’re trying to just think more outward to the city — like a permanent attraction,” Hansen said.
Looking around at the modern hotels, office buildings and tidy walking trail surrounding the railroad, Bourassa recalled how it was all just a dirt parking lot when he started volunteering.

“I love Portland and the breweries and the restaurants and things but I’m only aware of one narrow gauge operating here,” he said. “It’s that uniqueness that’s our advantage in becoming more involved in the community. We’re like nothing else".


There is a mention of the WW&F in there:
Quote
Currently two other historic railways also run narrow gauge trains in the state. The Wiscasset, Waterville and Farmington Railway Museum operates in Alna and the Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad runs out of Phillips.

« Last Edit: May 09, 2023, 03:16:36 PM by Graham Buxton »
Graham

Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2023, 09:29:44 AM »
I read it with no issues. Where did their loco #5 come from?

Jeff
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Mike Fox

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2023, 10:15:15 AM »
That is Edaville #5. On loan from them while #1 is awaiting repairs
Mike
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Graham Buxton

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2023, 10:29:37 AM »
Where did their loco #5 come from?



It appears to be formerly Edaville #5. See the photo here: http://photos.nerail.org/s/?p=184108
Graham

Mike Fox

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« Last Edit: May 10, 2023, 12:44:07 PM by Ed Lecuyer »
Mike
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Graham Buxton

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2023, 01:22:37 PM »
Well, if you look at the photo in the article in post #1, the locomotive has been re-lettered to be "Maine Narrow Gauge", rather than Edaville.
Graham

Mike Fox

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2023, 02:29:29 PM »
It is there for the summer, a short term swap for #3 is what has been stated elsewhere.
Mike
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Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2023, 08:52:56 AM »
Was that loco at Boothbay for one summer?

Jeff
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Anthony Vo

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2023, 07:25:15 AM »
Was that loco at Boothbay for one summer?

Jeff

That probably would be Edaville Whitcomb #3 you're thinking of: https://photos.bringfido.com/attractions/9/7/9/13979/13979_30639.jpg?size=slide&density=2x

An interesting little critter.
A guy from Maryland who likes Two-foot gauge Railroads

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Re: Article on young MNG management
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2023, 12:11:39 PM »
[Bruce Wilson wrote]

Older members of the W.W. & F. Ry. Museum will recall that the Whitcomb (Edaville no. 3) and the Plymouth (Bridgton no. 9) were at one time both owned by the Gilbert family at Beaver Brook Farm & Transportation Museum of Mont Vernon, N.H.  In the mid-1990's, these engines were offered for sale to the W.W. & F.  Though the deal was never made, both machines were bought by Marshfield, Mass. contractor, John N. Flagg for his personal collection. The Whitcomb was painted and lettered for the Cape Cod Canal railroad, which may have been done as a tribute to rail construction equipment once used for the creation of the canal. When Mr. Flagg became involved at Edaville, he painted and lettered the Plymouth for "Cranrail Corp." which was the operating entity at Edaville in the (circa) 1999 - 2000 period. The Whitcomb originally had a Hercules gas engine and chain driven. Under Cranrail, the critter was repowered with a turbocharged Cummins diesel and truck transmission. The cab was altered and handrails and running boards installed. A very powerful little machine, it could only be described as he'll on wheels, out on the old Edaville main. While this engine has kept a spot on the Edaville motive power roster, the Plymouth went on to the Silver Lake Railroad in Madison, N.H. until being sold to the Bridgton Railway Museum.
« Last Edit: August 17, 2023, 03:16:00 PM by Ed Lecuyer »