Author Topic: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion  (Read 1483 times)

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« on: March 04, 2023, 10:16:42 PM »
It seems to me the snow has come later in Maine and  Alna than the previous years but now it looks like to catching up  on the time. Have a nice Sunday Mike.
Yeah man, ... I've been saying for over 10 years now that it seems like they've been pushing winter just a little more to the right each year. ;)

Mike Fox

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2023, 02:37:22 PM »
Plowing while it is cold prevents snow balling up and sticking to the plow. But that does not help at the crossings where the real issues will be.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2023, 09:33:06 AM by Mike Fox »
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Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2023, 07:20:43 PM »
52 has proven to be incapable of dealing with even a small amount of snow (6”) that’s been through a thaw freeze cycle, if frozen.  It doesn’t have the weight for traction or the power to push through.  It can handle butter snow, even rolling snowballs. 

Currently planning to plow tomorrow, 2ish.

Thanks,
Jason

Rick Rowlands

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2023, 08:03:57 AM »
Sounds like you all need this plow more than I do!  This was the first car that we bought after acquiring 58 and it is still in Iowa.  Bought it more as a novelty than as something useful to our operation. 
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John Kokas

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2023, 08:20:34 AM »
With the steeper angle and longer cut this would go through the heavy snow and drifts much more easily than the plow on #52 right now.  Maybe we should take Rick up on his offer.  I always thought it would be cool to design and build a scaled down version of either a Jordan or Russell plow for the line.
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Dag Bonnedal

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2023, 03:04:16 PM »
A good snow plow is a necessity, and with a powerful loco behind it is great fun to charge the drifts. Steam is of course king, but a good diesel is OK.
This video was shot ten years ago, when our Ukrainian diesel was new on our line. The plow was built in 1912 by Atlas-Copco.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rg6STpBP0zk
Note the rodent in distress at 5:30 min, it managed to get out of the way.

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Wayne Laepple

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2023, 03:06:20 PM »
No matter what kind of plow, the need is still for weight and tractive effort of the locomotive, especially to push corn snow or frozen and refrozen snow.

Bob Holmes

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2023, 06:10:53 PM »
Think ahead to 53!  Rick's plow would probably be a really good match...

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Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2023, 08:01:01 PM »
Rick’s plow wouldn’t be very appropriate for 52 or 53, as steep wedge plows without a lifting edge are subject to derailment from uneven side loads, since they need speed to bull through.  However Rick’s plow is intriguing to me as a possible partial solution to ballast regulation.

Harry had studied railroad snow plow theory and passed both his knowledge and interest to me many years ago.  It’s sort of quintessential Maine two foot railroading to study snow plow theory, I think.  Arranging the leading edge to first lift the snow before wedging it out is an important feature to reduce side load and derailment hazard.  52’s current plow is designed with that theory.  This design has its own problems, though, as the lifting of the snow puts a tremendous vertical load on the locomotive’s lead axle springs.  Indeed, 52’s springs have suffered from plow duty, and have recently been replaced (not solely due to plowing however).

In fact a major motivator for No 53, for me, has always been a locomotive with sufficient traction to properly handle a modern diesel locomotive pony plow design on both ends.  These plows have a shallow wedge angle and steep cutting edge angle, and work like a lathe tool.  Snow is clearly sheared at the cutting edge- natural throwing it up- then it’s thrown out by the shallow wedge.  At present the plan is to outfit 53 with such plows on both ends, both with flanging attachments. 

Flanged track is wonderful…

I don’t mean any of this to be discouraging to this conversation.  I did want to pass on that we’ve got a fair amount of thought into the topic,

Thanks
Jason

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #9 on: March 07, 2023, 08:27:20 PM »
All this brings to mind the B&SR plow and flanger currently stored on-campus.
1) What would need to be done work-wise to bring the plow to serviceable, likewise the flanger?
2) Has anyone considered us building our own plow/flanger car(s)?
I feel these questions have come up before, but this seems an apropos place to revisit the idea(s).

Andrew Toppan

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2023, 09:29:02 PM »
All this brings to mind the B&SR plow and flanger currently stored on-campus.
1) What would need to be done work-wise to bring the plow to serviceable, likewise the flanger?
2) Has anyone considered us building our own plow/flanger car(s)?
I feel these questions have come up before, but this seems an apropos place to revisit the idea(s).

The B&SR plow is badly rotted - holes through the body and rot visible from a distance. I'd guess it needs a complete rebuild.

Mike Fox

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2023, 12:31:26 PM »
We had discussed restoring the Flanger, but it is almost a complete restoration. Lot's of work, including some new beams and decking. But would definately be a good piece to have working, both for flanging and winter photographic opportunities. But is not a priority yet..
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Bob Holmes

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2023, 09:24:58 PM »
Jason, you never cease to amaze me by your depth of knowledge.  Like railroad snowplowing??!

Benjamin Maggi

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Re: Plowing Ahead - Snow removal discussion
« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2023, 02:52:14 PM »
This video was shot ten years ago, when our Ukrainian diesel was new on our line. The plow was built in 1912 by Atlas-Copco.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rg6STpBP0zk

That is a neat video, but if the plow derailed I would hate to be those people riding it!