Author Topic: Tie Laying  (Read 1095 times)

Carl G. Soderstrom

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Tie Laying
« on: November 28, 2021, 05:22:23 PM »
I wonder if this could be adapted to 2 Foot?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOsva2rzLMk

The guy replacing the wood tie can't be in the US - there are not
2 supervisors watching.

Does not seem that it is an oak tie -- 3 strikes to drive home spike. :-)

Bill Baskerville

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2021, 07:58:00 PM »
Wow, it only takes one (Russian because it looks like 5' gauge) railroad worker to change a tie.  I liked how he put one foot on the brace rod to raise the tie so he could drive the spikes.  I don't think even the youngest of our team could do that.
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Stephen Lennox

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2021, 08:32:38 PM »
Wouldn't you like to see him show up on work weekend.... any weekend.

James Patten

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2021, 09:00:12 PM »
Either the fellow was breathing in Helium, or the video was sped up some.  I like the spade, though.

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2021, 12:55:07 PM »
That guy is the true heir to Stahkanov. I  agree with James I think that the video has been a bit sped up, just a remnant of beyond the iron curtain Propaganda. I 'm fairly sure the guy is wearing Volks Polizei in short Vopo boots. I bought the same yers ago, very souple leather but not safety boots and at this rate he must have worn them out in no time. Very interesting video but I was surprised at the use of spikes out there. Anywaythat guy is a real virtuoso when it comes to swirling the maul maybe you should hire him.

Rick Rowlands

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2021, 09:59:00 PM »
Putting one foot on the nipping bar while driving a spike is standard procedure for changing a tie by oneself.  I have done more than I can count that way, and even after slowing the video down to its proper speed, this guy still is way faster than I am!



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Wayne Laepple

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2021, 06:40:34 PM »
I used to be able to "roll the hammer" like that tie replacement guy. Then I got old.

Some people call folks who drive spikes that way "twirlers," and I've also heard them called "whirly-birds."  It took me a couple of years to be able to do that. It was great fun to drive spikes that way with one or two others, taking turns striking the spike. Now, I am told, the Class I railroads no longer allow gang spiking. One man has to do it, and no other people are allowed within 25 feet while he's doing it. He must have hearing protection, safety glasses, a face shield and a hard hat. They took all the fun out of it!

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2021, 11:07:57 AM »
Hey Wayne ,Safety First ! Out here we say that way too much safety can kill safety itself I don't know if it's true but I agree with you when you say it took the fun out of quite a lot of things and not only on the railroad.

James Patten

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2021, 12:49:14 PM »
I'm surprised that body armor isn't also required now-a-days to spike.  It can really hurt if your spike comes out back toward you and hits you.

Benjamin Richards

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2021, 03:43:38 PM »
It's true that safety regulations can be obstructive and even ridiculous, especially when concocted by bureaucrats far-removed from the occupation itself. Many are designed to protect the financial and legal liabilities of employers/manufacturers primarily, and the well being of employees/users only secondarily.

On the other hand, I voluntarily don PPE (earplugs especially) for tasks many folks would scoff at.

So I guess it comes down to your risk tolerance. Life by definition is risky.

Mike Fox

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2021, 09:26:41 AM »
Hearing protection is a must for lots of stuff we do. Even some jobs you think don't need hearing protection. I use them with any small engine, most power tools, running equipment, spiking or anytime noise is present. I had tinitus for a long time, though not as bad as others, and by comstantly using hearing protection, I barely hear the constant ringing.

As for the rest of the safety items, that is everywhere. Injuries cost companies millions of dollars every year, so if there is a proven way to reduce or eliminate the hazard, they do it. Safety is something we should embrace.
Mike
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Russ Nelson

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2021, 06:57:50 PM »
I'm surprised that body armor isn't also required now-a-days to spike.  It can really hurt if your spike comes out back toward you and hits you.
I took one right on the shin.

Stephen Lennox

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2021, 08:30:15 PM »
Recently, the mid week track crew has been setting spikes with a 4 lb long handled hammer, it gives us a straight shot on the spike and have found it helps eliminate the flying spike. The other problem we found is that some of our spike maul heads are getting rounded allowing the maul to slide off of the spike head. If there is anyone out there that has experience in refurbishing the maul heads, please get in touch with me. Speaking about spike mauls, it would be great if we had someone who is really good at replacing maul handles. I think Dana can give more insight on spike mauls.

Benjamin Richards

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2021, 11:39:41 PM »
Speaking of handles: my father broke the handle on his woodsplitting maul once too many, and resolved to fix it for good. He wanted a steel tube handle, but all the fabricators had at his office was solid bar stock. So he is now the proud owner of what is possibly the world's only solid-steel-handled woodsplitting maul. 8-pound head and 8-pound handle.

Bill Baskerville

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Re: Tie Laying
« Reply #14 on: December 10, 2021, 12:07:18 AM »
Too much weight for me to handle.....
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