Author Topic: English vs French. Languages words colloquial expressions and such like  (Read 1243 times)

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Carl, Benjamin. Language and especially vocabulary keeps on changing and evolving; each generation creates its proper words and expressions let alone slang. On fb when I comment and reply  to my AMTP's friends that there are mostly under 40 I often use old words and colloquial expressions my parents used  when I was a youngster just for the fun.  Do you still say or use the verb to dig meaning to look at or to like something or understand and the expression down the road a piece or to flee the coop in French "prendre la clĂ© des champs" or the adverb doggone all terms I heard when listening to rock'n roll in the sixties. BTW what does the expression" to rock the house" mean ? is it a byword for "to make it big"  meaning a big success.

James Patten

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"Rock the house" sort of refers to a party with loud music, or other loud, boisterous gathering. 

Keith Taylor

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"Rock the house" sort of refers to a party with loud music, or other loud, boisterous gathering.
Originally it referred to a boisterous crowd at a venue like a theater.

Keith

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Thank you James and Keith. In French we have two colloquial expressions that mean to be tremendously successful The first one is "casser la baraque" pretty much like to bring the house down and the second one is "faire un malheur" meaning word for word to cause a tragedy pretty much like in English to make a killing or to make a great or smashed hit.