Author Topic: Archiving narrow gage magazine articles  (Read 658 times)

Bruce Wilson

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Archiving narrow gage magazine articles
« on: February 07, 2024, 07:59:02 PM »
Recently purchased the November, 1931 issue of Railroad Man's Magazine from a dealer on eBay. I wanted the story by Freeman Hubbard, "Sandy River Blues". After receiving the old pulp paper treasure today, I sent the gentleman an e- mail thanking him for his fast service, etc. and after talking a bit, we discovered we are both life members of the W.W. & F. Ry. Museum! How's that for a small world...?
Wanted: Copies of correspondence and photographs from "first generation narrow gage railfans" such as Linwood Moody, Dick Andrews, Lawrence Brown, Ellis Atwood, H.T. Crittenden and others. Interested in all two foot (U.S.) rail operations, common carrier, industrial/mill and park/museum.

Ivanov Marin

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Re: Archiving narrow gage magazine articles
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2024, 02:09:52 AM »
That's absolutely incredible! The serendipity of finding a fellow life member of the W.W. & F. Ry. Museum through a simple eBay purchase is truly remarkable. It's a testament to the unique connections and shared interests that can be uncovered in unexpected places. Small world, indeed!  :P

Carl G. Soderstrom

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Re: Archiving narrow gage magazine articles
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2024, 11:53:28 PM »
You must remember that there is only 6º of separation to the
whole world.

4º in a state or of a group of people with the same interest.

I have met people in Minnesota (at model train shows) that
lived within the sound of the whistles at Sheepscot.

When I was much younger I read books where the author would
have people interact that unknowingly had mutual acquaintances.
I thought "Right! - like that is going to happen" well it happens quite
often - it is like the "Force" is trying to get us together.

Recently: A long convoluted story - where things had to happen precisely,
so that I met an ex-co-workers wife to find he had passed away.

My son says there are more misses than hits, which is probably true -
but the number of hits is astounding.

PS - I met Alice and stood on the deck of #9 back in 1964 with all that cannotes.
 


« Last Edit: February 22, 2024, 12:01:34 AM by Carl G. Soderstrom »

Bruce Wilson

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Re: Archiving narrow gage magazine articles
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2024, 10:32:17 AM »
Carl,
Any memories of that visit and meeting Alice, that you would care to share?
Wanted: Copies of correspondence and photographs from "first generation narrow gage railfans" such as Linwood Moody, Dick Andrews, Lawrence Brown, Ellis Atwood, H.T. Crittenden and others. Interested in all two foot (U.S.) rail operations, common carrier, industrial/mill and park/museum.

Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Archiving narrow gage magazine articles
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2024, 09:08:55 AM »
Carl,

Your recollections of meeting Alice would make an interesting article for the newsletter.

Jeff
Hey Rocky, watch me pull a moose trout out of my hat.

Carl G. Soderstrom

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Re: Archiving narrow gage magazine articles
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2024, 12:47:50 AM »
I am thinking what to reply here - mostly 6º separation and coincidence.
But it would take 16pt type to make a column inch. maybe 20pt. :D

Bruce Wilson

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Re: Archiving narrow gage magazine articles
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2024, 08:05:58 PM »
Six degrees of separation theory aside, I've always been curious if Alice Ramsdell knew of the wild paint schemes that some of the Edaville locomotives were once subjected to. Had she sold Portland Company locomotive no. 622 to Edaville, might it have suffered a similar though "temporary" treatment? Given that the colorful paint work was done in the 1950's, it seems likely she knew.
Wanted: Copies of correspondence and photographs from "first generation narrow gage railfans" such as Linwood Moody, Dick Andrews, Lawrence Brown, Ellis Atwood, H.T. Crittenden and others. Interested in all two foot (U.S.) rail operations, common carrier, industrial/mill and park/museum.