Author Topic: preservation and hokum  (Read 29705 times)

Mike Fox

  • Museum Member
  • Empire Builder
  • ********
  • Posts: 5,680
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #15 on: December 26, 2008, 04:32:52 PM »
I like the pumpkin patch idea. I always thought that could make for a fun ride. Perhaps there is a local farm that would be interested in participating with us. Train ride, wagon ride, pick your pumpkin and return.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

John Kokas

  • Museum Member
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,734
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #16 on: December 26, 2008, 05:12:54 PM »
Wayne - Ditto from here,  well said.................
Moxie Bootlegger

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #17 on: December 26, 2008, 05:30:33 PM »
Honestly?
I like the "Ice Cream ride" idea myself. Especially since it can be done in summer, later in the afternoon/evening and not tied to any specific day/date/weekend. I think it allows for a bit more flexibility.
Personally, I love the idea of an ice cream on a warm summer evening, and have been known to drive a few miles to some of the "neater" places here in CT to find it.
Would Giffords, or perhaps some local creamery be interested in either sponsoring or co-ordinating such an event?

Stephen Hussar

  • Museum Member
  • Conductor
  • *****
  • Posts: 913
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2008, 08:10:49 PM »
"yum, these sprinkles are delicious... those aren't sprinkles, they're black flies!"  ;)
« Last Edit: December 26, 2008, 09:08:28 PM by Stephen Hussar »

Wayne Laepple

  • Museum Member
  • Yardmaster
  • *******
  • Posts: 2,123
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2008, 08:38:38 PM »
A little extra protein is good for you!

Bill Reidy

  • Museum Member
  • Inspector
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,434
  • Life member. Ack.
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2008, 09:36:16 PM »
"yum, these sprinkles are delicious... those aren't sprinkles, they're black flies!"  ;)

I thought they were jimmies!
What–me worry?

Stewart "Start" Rhine

  • Museum Member
  • Superintendent
  • ********
  • Posts: 3,025
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2008, 10:55:27 AM »
As long as none of the jimmies are moving!

Wayne's post has two ideas and both are period appropriate.  The Ice Cream ride is good all Summer, it should bring families out the way Victorian Christmas does.  It would be a separate event from the annual picnic.  The pumpkin patch is good another family event.  It gives kids a chance to detrain and have some fun at AC or in Albee's field.  The Model A truck would be used for the pumpkin patch and could give hay rides after the pumpkins are all set out.

These events would give the WW&F additional family outings for Summer and Fall. 

Ira Schreiber

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,070
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2008, 11:59:58 AM »
Good ideas, BUT, no large events should be planned until the restroom and parking issues are settled.

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2008, 06:36:28 PM »
I don't think that the aforementioned events would be all that much larger than those held already, more they'd bring up ridership a bit durring times that other larger events are NOT happening,... ie: durring the later sumer hours (when the days are longer,) and durring the weekends BEFORE the Haloween train event. In other words, I don't see, so much, a bigger event than the Haloween/Christmass/etc trains, just a means of getting a few more riders in durring the slacker times between the other events.
Noone's saying that the ice cream rides need be a record-breaking attendance gala event, nor the pumpkin patch trains. BUT,...
the extra revenues collected during those runs will help go towards things like restrooms and parking.

Wayne Laepple

  • Museum Member
  • Yardmaster
  • *******
  • Posts: 2,123
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #24 on: December 27, 2008, 10:38:49 PM »
An ice cream event could be held on a Saturday evening, maybe once a month May through September, when folks at campgrounds and motels may be looking for some fun family activity. The key, of course, is to advertise it at campgrounds, motels, etc. Posters can be made up and printed quite inexpensively, and if a blank is left for the time and date, it can be filled in with a Magic Marker when a date is set.

As for the Pumpkin Patch, I suggested it in lieu of the Halloween trains, since it could be operated during the day on the weekend before Halloween and would not require extra crews, night time operations, etc.

Another option might be a big barbecue at Alna Center, featuring hot dogs, burgers, etc., along with some sort of live music. Again, an opportunity on a Saturday night to make a few extra bucks.

As Cosmo noted, these are events that can add to the bottom line. The possibilities are endless, and the powers-that-be must recognize that such events, while hokey and not historically appropriate, supplement our income and allow us to do other things that are. 

John Kokas

  • Museum Member
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,734
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #25 on: December 28, 2008, 07:03:42 AM »
Smack dab on the head Wayne!!!!!!  One thing I learned was that the Pumpkin trains brought many more people than a haunted train.  It's little kid friendly........

As for a BBQ type, I'd suggest that it be done in conjunction with a Threshers event or similar.  I for one don't recommend doing the BBQ ourselves, let someone who does it for a living have the headaches.  Although hosting a BBQ competition maybe a possibility, lots of people and a really fun time...........

As many of us have said on this forum, being exactly prototypical and historical is fine as long as it brings in the visitors.  Reality is that museum or not, we are in the "entertainment/education" business and if you don't bring them in, well the alternative is not attractive.
Moxie Bootlegger

Robert Hale

  • Hostler
  • ***
  • Posts: 213
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #26 on: December 28, 2008, 05:48:49 PM »
I'll throw my .02 worth in, being that I have watched the thread for a while now.

The top of the mountain seems to be the best spot to stop the line re-construction for many reasons, and here they are:
I gives time, man power and funds to complete the parking area and restrooms. It allows for ROW maintenance to catch up. During the "pause", rail, ties and other supplies can be stockpiled ready to go once the line resumes building. It gives time to plan and fix the landslide and to allow for the Trout creek bridge to be finished (Marines?).
I think shifting the focus to maintaining the ROW and facilities to support more and different ways of income are good.
About the rolling stock, having a sharper focus on #9 to complete it will be good for the RR. Having 2 steam locos operating will help attendance increase.
My suggestion too is to build (or locate one and modify it) a ballast hopper for ROW work.
I know these things take time, money and manpower. Additional activities like the pumpkin patch trains, Ice cream trains and others to increase ridership are all good ideas.
Now, when can I start to build the WW&F light plant building and put a Fairbanks morse generator in it? Bio-diesel and all.......(when I retire from the Airforce)

Rob

Bill Sample

  • Museum Member
  • Fireman
  • ****
  • Posts: 345
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2008, 05:51:10 PM »
Good ideas, BUT, no large events should be planned until the restroom and parking issues are settled.

If the property (think it was in the Percival Family) at the corner of ME 218 and Cross Rd is still available, that would take care of extra special events parking needs as it did before.  Regarding toilet needs, bring in some additional port-a-potties.
As Wayne and Cosmo said, the extra profits would be welcomed for reinvestment in property and equipment improvements.

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 634
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2008, 06:35:48 PM »
Another option might be a big barbecue at Alna Center, featuring hot dogs, burgers, etc., along with some sort of live music. Again, an opportunity on a Saturday night to make a few extra bucks.
 

This sounds a LOT like my "Alna Center Folk/Blues Festival" idea.  ;)

Jock Ellis

  • Museum Member
  • Hostler
  • ***
  • Posts: 253
    • View Profile
Re: preservation and hokum
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2008, 08:39:06 PM »
Some 40 miles north of Atlanta, GA, a farmer turned his corn field into a maze during the fall. People drove from miles around in such numbers that traffic on the 2-lane road was a nightmare and half the sheriff's deputies were out there. If you had a friendly farmer along the ROW who might be interested in such a money-making project, you could be the staging area for parking and run shuttles to the farm.
People ride the Grand Canyon RR to go to that attraction instead of driving so I feel sure that it will work.
I don't know how far Alna is from a big city or even Bangor but people will drive for many miles for fun on a weekend. I've read and realized that just about major attraction in the Atlanta area is designed to pick $100 from your wallet. I would guess that attractions in Maine are about the same.
What about a farmer's market on the museum property at the proper times of the year? I assume people still farm in Maine.
Jock Ellis
Jock Ellis