Author Topic: Watertank Photos  (Read 2222 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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Watertank Photos
« on: December 13, 2008, 06:58:45 PM »
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Watertank Photos has been converted from the pre-July 2008 WW&F Discussion Forum.
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Stephen Hussar wrote:
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All, a few new Watertank photos from Saturday, July 14th.


I don't know the other folks, but the guy way up high on the right is Fred Morse!


A look inside Sheepscot yard's most imposing structure...


Marcel, with Sheepscot yard far below...


No explanation needed as to where this picture of Zack was taken!

Ira Schreiber replied:
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A great series of photos.
The person on the left is an unidentified female, but the person in the middle, next to Fred, is an unidentified Male.

James Patten replied:
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On the top photo, the guy next to Fred is one of our newest volunteers!   Although tough to say if he'll be back or not.  He and his girlfriend (the gal waiting on the ground) rode the train, and took a look at the water tank once they got back.  Next thing I knew he was helping out.

gordon cook replied:
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Gee, the yard looks so neat in the picture with Marcel (well, he looks neat, too) it could almost be a model!
A terrific job without a doubt.
Even more terrific is Fred up there nailing away. Gotta love it.
_________________
Gawdon

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Steve,  Thanks for the pics.  Great progress on the tank!  I wish I could be there to help with construction...  makes me want to jump in the truck and head to Maine.

PCo622 replied:
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The gent on the left is Mike, Howard Gunnison's grandson.  If you recall Mr Gunnison was the man who donated his entire RR collection of memorabilia to the museum in early 2005.  Mike told me that his grandad took him to Edaville many, many times.  That is how Mike came to have an avid interest in narrow gauge trains.  Off hand I do not remeber his last name.  Great guy too.  He lives in Mass and was up visiting relatives over the weekend.

PCo622 replied:
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Eratta:  Mr Gunnison's collection came to us in 2001, not 2005 as stated in my previous post.  Sorry.

PCo622 replied:
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Thanks Gordon.  I don't try to make a fashion statement while I'm at the RR, but thanks for noticing!!!   :lol:

elecuyer replied:
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Drifting off topic, but I'll split it if it goes too far...

Mr. Gunnison inspired more than his grandson with the interest in the Narrow Gauge. My father worked along side Howie at the Walpole State Prison as a high-pressure steam bolier engineer. Knowing my love for trains, Mr. Gunnison volunteered to treat me to a day at Edaville. I became his "nephew" for the day, and had the run of the park - cab rides included - in countless trips around the bogs. It is a day I still treasure.

I also grew up in Wrentham, MA - where Mr. Gunnison lived. We often drove past his house, with his large collection of switch stands proudly displayed at the top of the hill of his driveway. When they disappeared from their perch (before my active involvement with the WW&F,) I often wondered where they ended up. Now, whenever the WW&F train goes through Alna Center, I say a small prayer for Mr. Gunnison as I pass by his switch stands once again.

And the post-lude is someday, maybe, I'll get my dad involved with the WW&F - his steam licence is still valid, but he hasn't gotten to operate a locomotive - yet.

-Ed Lecuyer

Joe Fox replied:
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Thanks for the photos Steve. That looks great. The yard only needs to have a few changes made, and it would look splended. How tall do people think the water tower building is? I am guessing it is at least 20 feet tall, maybe even 25 feet.

Joe

Mike Fox replied:
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Using Fred as a scale, and knowing the walls are 16 feet, That would put the peak in the ballpark of 25 feet. Give or take a few feet.
Mike

Ira Schreiber replied:
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Is Fred well balanced enough to be used as a scale?

Mike Fox replied:
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He seems balanced on my computer. Is he moving on yours???

Ira Schreiber replied:
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DARN, I just found out that the back of my chair was loose. My computer is OK and Fred is well balanced.

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Fred's ok but did Marcel ever get out of the watertank's attic !!?!   

PCo622 replied:
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YES!!  I made it out alive and will live to type another day!!

Stephen Hussar replied:
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More photos from this weekend. Sorry, I never left the yard, so I have NO photos of the ROW clearing -- which I am told looks fantastic!








Joe Fox replied:
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Thanks Steve. Steve Zuppa said that it is a wonderful view from up there. Would it be possible to have a camera up there for the Annual Picnic? What a neat shot, or video that could be made for the photo freight during the Annual Picnic.

Joe

Joe Fox replied:
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By the way, Dad told me that somebody told him that the water tower is 26' 4" tall. Does anybody know how tall the engine house is?

Joe

ladyhugs replied:
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On the top photo, the guy next to Fred is one of our newest volunteers!   Although tough to say if he'll be back or not.  He and his girlfriend (the gal waiting on the ground) rode the train, and took a look at the water tank once they got back.  Next thing I knew he was helping out.

I've spoken with my son and he has spoken of his climb to the top of the tower to help out and tells me that when he can he will be back to help out. His girlfriend was rather nervous with him that high up though    Michael and Jaime both enjoyed their time spent there and said eveyone was very nice.

jockellis replied:
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I don't know if anyone makes movies in Maine, but I think the museum might look into getting an agent.
Who know when a movie company might need a railroad for a scene? It would be hard to find a prettier one than this one.
Question: Do you put insulation inside the outer walls to keep the cold out? What did the steam roads of the north use years ago, if they did?
Jock Ellis

Stephen Hussar replied:
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While not a "movie," the museum has been starring in a one-hour PBS special (as a 20-minute first segment) for nearly 2 years. http://restorationstories.com/chapterone.html

Shameless plug season is officially open! 

Mike Fox replied:
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Jock,
The water tower is not insulated, but the pump house is. The tank was drained after the last run of the year to prevent the water from freezing. And some towers were closed in like ours and heated with a coal or wood stove.
Mike

James Patten replied:
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I think quite a number of movies are made in Maine.  Many stars seem to have homes on islands or in remote locations, so that may influence the movies that get made here.  Man Without A Face and Empire Falls were both made here.  I saw Kristie (or is it Kirstie) Alley walk out of Moody's Diner one day as I was walking in.

jockellis replied:
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Mike,
Did the original WW&F only keep water in the towers when the train was coming? Also, does draining have any effect, either positive or negative, on the tank? And, finally, what was the original tank made of?
Jock Ellis

Mike Fox replied:
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Jock,
Now you have gone beyond my knowledge base. The trains needed water so I assume the tanks were in use year round. Most tanks were spring fed. There are some I am not sure of though that might have had to be pumped up somehow.
As far as any effect on the tank, the tank is coated so there is no danger of rust on the inside. And I don't think the timbers or metal tank mind a little relief once in a while. Draining it just prevents freeze up and potential bursting of the pipes or tank.
And for the original. I don't know much about that but I believe the tank was metal. The building that was built at the museum is a mirror copy of the original.
Mike

Stephen Hussar replied:
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I believe more images can be found on the museum's website.

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Jock, The original Headtide tank was metal, it was removed after the railroad quit running in 1933.  The South wall was removed and the tank pulled out to be loaded on a truck or trailer.   Steve, Thanks for posting the photos.  The bottom photo shows the original structure with one wall missing.  The track would have been to the right.

As to wooden tanks, they last longer when kept full.  Water stays in the grain and keeps the wood.  The stays in a wooden tank will shrink when the tank has been dry for a while.  This causes gaps in the joints and the tank bands get loose.  A dried-out tank will leak when refilled.  The wood will eventually swell back but you have to be sure the bands are in the right place.  Wooden tanks were usually made of cedar.

Mike Fox replied:
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One of those days today I wish I had my camera. The new spout on the watertank looks great and gives the tower a whole new look.No one will be dissapointed when they see it. They did a fabulous job figuring and fabricating.
Mike

Stephen Hussar replied:
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The watertank with new spout.



Glenn Christensen replied:
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Very nice!!!

Thanks Stephen!

Best Regards,
Glenn

Stephen Hussar replied:
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Thanks, Glenn. Here's another view looking south...


Joe Fox replied:
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Wow, great photos. I am glad to see the spout on the tower. Thanks for sharing Steve.

Joe

Mike Fox replied:
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Now you can see what I mean. No one will dislike that.
Mike

Bill Reidy replied:
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WOW!  Those photos look great!  Mike's right - the tank looks much different with the spout attached.

That's what I love about this group.  Every time I think I can't be amazed again, something like this happens!

Bill
Ed Lecuyer
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