Author Topic: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...  (Read 23637 times)

Benjamin Campbell

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Re: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...
« Reply #45 on: December 14, 2016, 09:24:40 PM »
Say we built south of Cross street and wanted to use one of our flats for ballast - could we get permission to block the street for half an hour or so - lay the snap track - push the flat across and remove the track?

Mike Fox

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Re: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...
« Reply #46 on: December 15, 2016, 08:57:03 AM »
It is possible, but no good way to load a flat car over there. There is also a wetland issue. In my dealings this fall so far with the Army Corps of Engineers and the Maine DEP,  they have very strict guidelines when dealing with these areas. We will be limited as to what we can do around Sheepscot. Carefully building up the ROW without filling in or disturbing any of the wetland areas.
And crossing the pond will be another issue. It can be done, by obtaining special permits. I touched on the subject with the Army Corps rep when we had him for a visit, just for an idea of what could be done, if anything. Not planning anything on the south side of 218 currently, but the thought was there so I asked.
Mike
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Roger Cole

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Re: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...
« Reply #47 on: December 15, 2016, 02:36:13 PM »
As to the wooden car argument, the Strasburg Railroad has wooden passenger cars and crosses several state highways with flashing lights, but they may have steel frames (I'm not sure).  Another thing to consider is the length of the ride.  Familys with small children, pregnant women and old geezers with BPH (I know one) might not necessarily enjoy a longer ride.  I don't think your coaches have rest room facilities, do they?

Mike Fox

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Re: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...
« Reply #48 on: December 15, 2016, 02:56:47 PM »
They are wooden cars, but are they on metal frames.
Mike
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Kevin Madore

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Re: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...
« Reply #49 on: December 15, 2016, 05:09:14 PM »
As to the wooden car argument, the Strasburg Railroad has wooden passenger cars and crosses several state highways with flashing lights, but they may have steel frames (I'm not sure).  Another thing to consider is the length of the ride.  Familys with small children, pregnant women and old geezers with BPH (I know one) might not necessarily enjoy a longer ride.  I don't think your coaches have rest room facilities, do they?

All of the crossings that the Strasburg Rail Road's regular tourist trains use are both lighted and gated.  

Glenn Christensen

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Re: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...
« Reply #50 on: December 15, 2016, 05:27:45 PM »
I'm just looking forward to seeing what happens over the next 100 years or so ...

We can discuss.


Best Regards,
Glenn

John Scott

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Re: To Cross or Not to Cross (or to Cross Cross Road?) That is the question...
« Reply #51 on: December 16, 2016, 11:48:20 PM »
The heritage-correct achievements of the carbuilders of Sheepscot are to be highly applauded. I am not sure that there would be anything to compare being done elsewhere in this modern world of ours.

From my experience, the idea of constructing look-alike steel framed cars should be approached with very great caution. There is no softness in steel. Rather like the difference between track laid on concrete ties, rather than wooden ties.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2016, 10:12:33 PM by John Scott »