Author Topic: Boiler plate flanging machine  (Read 31100 times)

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #30 on: January 23, 2017, 02:26:40 PM »
That is a Hanna pneumatic squeeze riveter, given to us along with the Allen Portable long reach riveter, by Jim Hueber of Mack Brothers Boiler in Syracuse, NY.

It too will be used on the boiler projects.

Jason

James Patten

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #31 on: January 23, 2017, 03:16:32 PM »
Another riveting machine.

Theoretically not as portable as the Allen Portable machine, but with the wheels I'd argue it makes it much more portable.

Stephen Piwowarski

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #32 on: January 29, 2017, 11:28:02 AM »
However, the Hanna riveter was also designed to be hung from an overhead crane. The frame is an "aftermarket" invention.

Missing you all! Best wishes on a good convention weekend!
Steve

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #33 on: January 29, 2017, 12:27:03 PM »
Yes, the Hanna riveter will be hung from the overhead crane, floated off its frame, and used to rivet the mud rings.

Jason

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #34 on: January 30, 2017, 11:41:57 AM »
The Hanna riveter is what was known in the trade as a "bull riveter." I don't know why, however.

Brendan Barry

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #35 on: March 10, 2017, 11:58:41 PM »
The flanger was tested for the first time last Tuesday. There are a couple of mechanical issues to address but the flanger successfully bent a piece of scrap boiler plate. Jason's pictures.

Piece of plate clamped on the anvil at the start of the bending process. The oil is from a loose hydraulic fitting on the clamping ram that has been fixed.



Start of the bend.





Test bend complete.



United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #36 on: March 11, 2017, 07:54:23 PM »
Thanks for the cool photos, Brendan. I can't wait to see this machine in action!

Roger Cole

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #37 on: March 11, 2017, 08:38:57 PM »
That's a mighty hefty hunka metal to bend

Ken Fleming

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #38 on: March 11, 2017, 09:53:58 PM »
Did you for magnaflux it for cracks? Or dye penetrate it.  Cracks are sneaky.

Paul Uhland

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #39 on: April 02, 2017, 12:36:21 PM »
Now having a secure container to store stuff taking up increasingly needed machine shop space makes total sense. And you may discover yet another container(s)  would be useful, as did 2926.
And with present harsh local weather, seems ideal time to concentrate on the many present/coming indoor projects.  
Per weather (40f and rising for concrete work), will the floor slab pours  be done first, or will you start asap, working around them if possible?
« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 12:39:35 PM by Paul Uhland »
Paul Uhland

Brendan Barry

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #40 on: April 19, 2017, 05:44:16 PM »
To get a feel for operating the flanging machine a replica of number 10's firebox corner was laid out and flanged out of a piece of scrap plate today. Tomorrow the crew plans to flange the real firebox sheet. Jason's pictures.



United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Benjamin Campbell

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #41 on: April 19, 2017, 06:07:45 PM »
Looks perfect. Is it done cold or must the steel be heated?

Harold Downey

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #42 on: April 19, 2017, 08:51:13 PM »
Not only cold, but Maine cold.  High probably 46 and windy.   The flanger area was chilly!   No heat involved in the flanging process.  It was done in about 4 distinct phases, so each about 22 degrees of bend.  Then a final pass through to smooth out any bumps that formed.  All in all, we are quite happy with how it went, and what we learned will make the actual first boiler sheet flanging go much better.  Dimensionally, it came out very good too. 

John Kokas

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #43 on: April 19, 2017, 09:11:43 PM »
Is there any heat treating planned to relieve stress points after flanging?
Moxie Bootlegger

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Boiler plate flanging machine
« Reply #44 on: April 20, 2017, 06:28:23 AM »
The ASME Code defines a minimum bend radius where the internal stresses from cold bending are acceptable.  It has to do with how much the metal is stretched/ compressed at the extreme surfaces.  Our sheets are all bent at or above that minimum.

See ya
Jason
« Last Edit: April 20, 2017, 08:34:32 AM by Jason M Lamontagne »