Author Topic: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread  (Read 198948 times)

Greg Klein

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #165 on: March 01, 2016, 09:50:54 AM »
Thanks Alan!  Most of the grabs are in good shape though some are bent a bit. Some bolts come apart with little effort, most require some motivation and others have to be cut. Nothing has been rusted so badly that I couldn't get the bolt shank out of the hole though some may look like they have corroded in to a single piece!  The draft gear is a good example.  I wasn't present when 67 was delivered, but from looking at the photos that Brendan had taken and comparing them to the old pictures, it appears some hardware is certainly missing, just have to figure out what.

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #166 on: March 01, 2016, 03:37:43 PM »
With all that heavily painted and/or rusty iron, perhaps it's time to think about investing in a blast cabinet so the paint or rust can be cleaned off before the parts are reused. We have one at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania that gets heavy use, and it makes painting parts soooo much easier.

Paul Uhland

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #167 on: March 01, 2016, 03:58:08 PM »
Wayne...I have used blast cabinets at 2926 and C&TS,
effortlessly, quickly clean small parts completely, ready for re-paint or whatever.

A rebuilding must. Check Harbor Freight.
Paul Uhland

Greg Klein

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #168 on: March 02, 2016, 09:10:47 AM »
I was thinking of a big tub of Coca Cola. ;)   There is the blaster used on #9's tender but that is not contained. 

Stephen Piwowarski

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #169 on: March 02, 2016, 10:35:27 AM »
I've never used it, but I'm a big fan of electrolysis. I'll help you build the tank if you'd like. I think it might be our best bet.
The materials the tank is built of are extremely inexpensive in comparison to a blasting cabinet and the consumables are cheaper than blasting media as well. All it needs is a well ventilated place to operate.

Check out a sample:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQNvhUYqCkw

Mike Fox

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #170 on: March 02, 2016, 12:12:42 PM »
I've never used it, but I'm a big fan of electrolysis.
Removing hair too?
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Philip Marshall

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #171 on: March 02, 2016, 01:24:49 PM »
For smaller parts I've found Evapo-Rust works really well. It takes the rust off down to bare metal just by soaking for a day or two.  Chemically it's just an iron chelating agent plus a detergent in aqueous solution, so it's supposed to be totally non-corrosive, safe for the user, and environmentally friendly -- which is rarely true for something so effective.

Ted Miles

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #172 on: March 02, 2016, 03:08:14 PM »
Folks,
        I am pleased to see that much of the iron work on the car can be saved and re-used. Laconia Car Company was a high class car builder; look at the interior sheathing and the details on the trucks for examples.

I also think that a way should be found to send the SR&RL wheel set back to Phillips. Maine Narrow Gauge must have a spare truck to trade or sell. Aren't the former Edaville cars at WW&F riding on B & SR trucks? 

There are cars from several Maine Narrow Gauge Railroads at Boothbay Railway Village; they do not have any trouble explaining them and their history. I think WW&F Museum will not either. It was pointed out that some day a B&SR tank car will be seen at the WW&F Museum.

I do not think it matters that the lines did not exchange freight cars. Museums can show cars from any of them!

Ted Miles, WW&F Life Member

Jon Chase

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #173 on: March 02, 2016, 03:09:26 PM »
Stephen,

I have used the electrolysis method for rust removal and it works quite well.  Specifically, I used it to clean down to bare metal a large, ornate cast-iron flywheel that was heavily rusted, and the result looked like it had just come from the foundry.  I used a $5.00 plastic wading pool for the tank, and the iron rebar electrodes were simply hung from the edge with the connecting wires - the suspension method shown in the video is more elaborate than necessary, but perhaps better lends itself to repeated use.  As I recall, the sodium carbonate (washing soda) I used was sold under the Arm & Hammer label in grocery stores.  I rested the heavy part to be cleaned on a couple of bricks.

But while this is a good method of rust removal, the problem at hand, as I recall from seeing the boxcar last fall, appears to be more a situation of paint removal.  If the paint in question was on top of rust, electrolysis might encourage it to fall off, but in that case it probably wouldn't be adhering too well anyway.

If you decide to experiment with electrolysis, an important safety concern is that the process produces hydrogen gas, so setting it up indoors, as the video appears to show, is definitely not a good idea. If you leave the process running outdoors, you may want to suspend some sort of roof over the tank, as rain will dilute the sodium carbonate solution and reduce its effectiveness. In my experience, larger items require more time than the small nuts and bolts shown in the video - my flywheel took three or four days to come clean.  Additional electrodes might have helped this along.

All in all, sandblasting is much, much quicker if the facilities are available, and will easily deal with paint just as well as rust. A cabinet is not necessarily required except for the smallest parts, as plywood or similar material can easily be set up as a sort of work enclosure to direct the nozzle toward, which will help capture most of the sand for re-use.

Jon Chase




     




Carl G. Soderstrom

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #174 on: March 10, 2016, 12:46:36 AM »
Just saw this for rust & paint removal

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgiecR6LzwA

Saw some other videos also - impressive -- if you have a spare $250,000.00

Brendan Barry

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #175 on: March 10, 2016, 08:03:00 PM »
The lumber for the car sheathing and floor arrived at Sheepscot today and was unloaded into 309. The first wheel set has been mounted in the lathe for turning next week and work on the truck rebuilds has started.

United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Brendan Barry

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #176 on: March 15, 2016, 09:38:13 AM »
The red oak logs that Fred donated for the car framing made the trip down to Copeland Lumber's sawmill in Marshfield, MA yesterday. We had 13 8' logs and 1 12' log that scaled out to 550 board feet on the log deck.

Our logs loaded on the log deck.





Log going through the saw.





Finished lumber and slabs on the green chain. Hardwood slabs are saved for firewood.



Our lumber coming off the green chain and being loaded on the trailer.




United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Philip Marshall

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #177 on: March 15, 2016, 02:16:02 PM »
Thanks Brendan, and thank you Fred for donating the logs!

Bill Reidy

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #178 on: March 15, 2016, 04:32:30 PM »
Thanks Brendan, and thank you Fred for donating the logs!

Yes.  And thank you, Dean, for the mill work.
What–me worry?

Carl G. Soderstrom

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Re: Box Car 67 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #179 on: March 16, 2016, 10:03:40 PM »
Will the lumber be air dried, kiln dried or put up green?

Thanks Fred, Brendan & Dean