Author Topic: October 2015 Work Planning  (Read 47692 times)

Mike Fox

  • Museum Member
  • Empire Builder
  • ********
  • Posts: 5,455
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #45 on: October 18, 2015, 07:46:12 PM »
A good pressure washing and liberal application of Harrys favorite oil would do wonders.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Stewart "Start" Rhine

  • Museum Member
  • Trainmaster
  • *******
  • Posts: 2,973
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #46 on: October 18, 2015, 07:55:06 PM »
It should be noted that Clarissa had the cedar shingles applied to the house.  For years the structure had the T 111 style plywood siding (painted yellow) that Harry put up.  Clarissa had the shingles put on after Harry passed away so the "siding" is about 10 years old.  Cedar shingles are usually good for 15 to 20 years, sometimes longer.  They turn dark but as long as they don't crack or curl they are good.  Last year all the trim on the house was painted which improved its appearance.  The job took about a month and the building looks pretty good.  Eventually there will be a new shed dormer built on the back of the second floor and a stair tower added to the north end to serve the expanded upstairs.  At that point the house may get new siding.  

Paul Uhland

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,074
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #47 on: October 18, 2015, 10:33:56 PM »
Cedar shingles are indeed hardy. My grandmother's bungalow on Staten Island, a Sears "kit house" put up by my  grandpa and uncles just after WWI  to escape Manhattan Hell's Kitchen tenements, had its  original shingles when we moved to Abq in 1957. Per recent Google Street View pics, they're still there, now painted green.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2015, 10:36:18 PM by Paul Uhland »
Paul Uhland

Win Nowell

  • Museum Member
  • Flagman
  • *
  • Posts: 38
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #48 on: October 19, 2015, 07:12:07 AM »
VINYL SIDING! HORROR OF HORRORS!!
Actually I have put vinyl on my house (ranch) and it looks good. It is faux shingles in gray. For the time being I would go with Mike's suggestion.
Win Nowell

Wayne Laepple

  • Museum Member
  • Yardmaster
  • *******
  • Posts: 2,109
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #49 on: October 19, 2015, 07:22:32 AM »
Vinyl siding serves to trap moisture behind it, allowing formation of mold and eventually rot. I just did a repair project at my daughter's house and found lots of nasty stuff when I removed some vinyl siding from the porch to get at the problem. Regular pressure washing and application of preservative is the way to go.

James Patten

  • Administrator
  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,056
  • Loco for 6
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #50 on: October 21, 2015, 06:12:52 AM »
Anticipated work for Saturday October 24:

* Car barn: south wall siding (under the eaves), maybe north wall siding.
* Loco 9
* Track: ballasting?  Connecting rails inside the barn?  The flatcar in the barn has a bunch of light rail on it.  It would be nice to build up a rail storage area along the future woods track location and move this rail to it.  It is very light so it won't take many to move it.

Dwight Winkley

  • Museum Member
  • Fireman
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #51 on: October 21, 2015, 08:34:51 AM »
James. this is 25 lb. rail on flat car. I was told that 33 lb rail was going to be used on the woods track after the curve. There is one curved rail on the ground between tracks 2 and 3 near south end of carbarn that has to be put back on flatcar. The 25Lb rail came from the far back end of the rail pile at Davis. The frount of the rail pile is 33 lb rail. Check with Dana or Jason before unloading rail near the woods track.
dwight
« Last Edit: October 21, 2015, 08:44:48 AM by Dwight Winkley »

Jason M Lamontagne

  • Operating Volunteers
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,687
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #52 on: October 21, 2015, 08:39:38 AM »
Rail weight on woods track still being discussed- not necessarily settled.

Jason

Paul Uhland

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,074
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #53 on: October 21, 2015, 10:22:47 AM »
Sounds like the car barn triangular gable end areas will get final sheathing; then, eventually, vertical battens on whole exterior.

I would use as heavy a rail as I had to finish trackwork. You never know what it will have to carry.
Your work train rig--52 with a long tow bar pulling a small 4-wheel flat cart, used at TOM, looks ideal for easily moving rail.  
« Last Edit: October 21, 2015, 10:49:34 AM by Paul Uhland »
Paul Uhland

Dwight Winkley

  • Museum Member
  • Fireman
  • ****
  • Posts: 373
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #54 on: October 21, 2015, 03:44:14 PM »
most of the time the 1 1/2 ton Brookville #51 is used with the long drawbar and 4 wheel flat. Moves 10 rails at a time.
dwight

John McNamara

  • Operating Volunteers
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,541
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #55 on: October 21, 2015, 04:10:24 PM »
How are we going to get our Beyer-Garrett delivered? Seriously though, if the woods track is for deliveries, it should not pose a weak spot in our system.

-John M

Gordon Cook

  • Museum Member
  • Fireman
  • ****
  • Posts: 482
  • Board Member 2009-2015
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #56 on: October 21, 2015, 05:01:00 PM »
Or No. 11?

I believe for low speed movements, 35lb rail is probably sufficient. I was just reading how #10 on the SRRL was OK on the older branches with light rail. We have lighter stuff in the yard now.
I'm sure Jason will chime in with actual knowledge.
Gawdon

John McNamara

  • Operating Volunteers
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,541
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #57 on: October 21, 2015, 05:33:01 PM »
I agree with Gordon on 33-35. It was 25 that I was concerned about.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2015, 05:35:12 PM by John McNamara »

Jason M Lamontagne

  • Operating Volunteers
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,687
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #58 on: October 21, 2015, 06:02:54 PM »
So- here's the flip side.  We are using 33, as most of you know.  This rail size is not asce- as such it is, as far as we know unique.  Once we use the last stick it's gone.  That's ok except that we have to maintain what we have.  

We currently have 7 conventional switches and one 3-way which require this rail size.   I'd like to be left with no less than 10 spare pieces to replace broken rails, make replacement points and frogs, etc.  10 may seem high, but forever is a long time...

I see the point on heavy rail on the woods track- but even as a loading track, we won't be in there that much.  The bay 2 shop lead was laid with 25 lb rail some 20 years ago- it's not all that bad off.

We have lots of 25 lb rail with no place to go.  We're running out of 33.

The worst axle loading the WW&F has ever seen is our 52.  Heavier than no 6.  52 trundles over the bay 2 lead regularly, far more than it will likely be on the woods track.  

All that said, Zack and others expressed some concern over using 25 lb rail on the woods track over work weekend.  I was busy and didn't take time to think through the pros and cons.  I have now and laid them out above.  I'll bring this back up with Zack and further opinions are certainly welcome here.  It may well end up 33- I won't go home crying!

Thanks,
Jason

Edit:  no 7 had a heavier axle loading.  8 tons.  Oops- and we're going to build one!  Opinion still pretty much the same on the woods track.  But I'm not that dug in on the subject.  Just want some spare 33 lb sticks when all is said and done.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2015, 06:07:55 PM by Jason M Lamontagne »

Jason M Lamontagne

  • Operating Volunteers
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,687
    • View Profile
Re: October 2015 Work Planning
« Reply #59 on: October 21, 2015, 06:15:43 PM »
Harry had a rule of thumb for rail weight suitable for main line service:  axle loading in tons / 2, X 10 for weight per yard.

25 lb rail good for 5 ton axle loading on the main line.

Of course tie spacing and roadbed factor in heavily.

See ya Jason