Author Topic: 2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)  (Read 6381 times)

John Kokas

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Now if we only could find WW&F stuff for "G" guage..........
Moxie Bootlegger

Dale Reynolds

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2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2014, 12:33:37 PM »
john, there is lots of wwandf parts for g gauge, 7/8 inch scale. most is from steve king of rocky mount, va. he has done several types of trucks and kits for rolling stock. a guy in new Zealand did a run of 5-10 pieces of #9 live steam about 15 years ago. I have one and it runs sweet. there is a yahoo group dedicated to this scale, and Jason kovacs in new jersey sells stuff. googling should work. dale

John Kokas

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2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2014, 04:18:47 PM »
I wonder if it would be worth the time and effort to work with a G scale producer and have a dedicated "WW&F" run of stuff that could be sold through the gift shop?  I would want it scaled so that it could use standard G scale track as the 2 foot gauge.  I know that I would buy it, but would others?  Comments welcomed.......
Moxie Bootlegger

Bob Springs

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2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2014, 07:54:47 PM »
You might give "Accucraft" a try. They are already dabbling in in 1 to 13.7 (correct scale for G gauge as 2ft)
http://www.accucraft.com/modelc/1menu_13p7_ls.htm  Often, Accucraft offers their models in both electric and live steam.

Don't, however, expect these to come cheep.  They build quality and their price reflects this.  My guess is you'd pay for a WW&F Forney about what I have invested in my 7 1/2 electric engine. 

BTW, it will run on 25 foot radius track, which allows a basic layout in my small back yard.  And 7 1/2 gauge track actually costs less per foot than G gauge.  If anyone is interested in building something like the #11, I'd be happy to pass along what I've learned.

Bob Springs

Dale Reynolds

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2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2014, 11:46:53 AM »
john, good luck on a commercial run of 7/8 scale stuff, there are probably only a dozen or 2 people in this scale!!!!   dale

Andre Anderson

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2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2014, 06:49:44 PM »
I wonder if it would be worth the time and effort to work with a G scale producer and have a dedicated "WW&F" run of stuff that could be sold through the gift shop?  I would want it scaled so that it could use standard G scale track as the 2 foot gauge.  I know that I would buy it, but would others?  Comments welcomed.......

The problem with "G" scale is that it does not exist, "G" gauge does. Remember that scale and gauge are not the same thing, one refers to distance between the rails(gauge) and the other refers to the proportion of the model to the real thing(scale). there are about seven different scales that exist in the large scale world, 1:13 = 2' gauge, 1:19 = 2' gauge on O scale track (32mm), 1:20.3 = 3' gauge, 1:22.5 = meter gauge (European narrow gauge), 1:24 = half inch to the foot, 1:29 = Quasi Standard gauge, 1:32 Standard gauge, (#1), all of these are running on G or #1 gauge track which has a track gauge of 45mm.

So the first decision that would have to be made is this locomotive going to be a scale model or something that just kinda of looks like something. LGB made a 2-4-4 Forney of no known scale and the later ones of some questionable quality and Bachmann made a 2-4-4 Forney with both inside and out side frames in 1:20.3 scale so it was a 3' gauge locomotive that was a fine model but of the wrong gauge. The MSR on this locomotive was about 1,400 and sold usally for about $800.

1:24 was started by Delton Locomotive Works as a way to build American narrow gauge, unfortunately this resulted in a track gauge of 3'6" (42") and the narrow gauge modelers coming from the smaller scales would not accept this compromise for 3' gauge models but the Garden Railroaders would so a lot of different rolling stock was made. Then USA Trains decided to do some standard gauge models and choose 1:29 because the visual bulk of the cars matched the 1:24 which they already had a bunch of and again the garden railroader liked it and it took off and 1:32 was left to the "Fine" scale modelers who ran live steam models.

Accucraft may not be making any more electric models as they have not sold any where near as well as the live steam models. Accucraft makes a nice little Forney all ready but it gauged for 3' rather than 2' which will not work for this application and they have not made a 1:13 model of a Forney yet, the other problem is that there is no rolling stock or very little available in this scale, Nick Schade who is a member would be able to tell you more about what is available in 1:13.

Round House out of England make a SR&RL 2-6-2 that is convertible from 45mm to 32mm in 1:19 scale, on 45mm track it is a 3' engine and on 32mm it is a  2' gauge engine.

The cost of making a set of injection molds for a locomotive would probably be around $350,000 to $500,000 and you would have to plan on selling at least 2000 models to get the costs down to where you could sell them. At 2000 models you would probably have a mold cost of $250.00 per unit sold.

Andre Anderson
« Last Edit: November 09, 2014, 06:56:31 PM by Andre Anderson »

John Kokas

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Re: 2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2014, 03:35:25 PM »
Wow Andre!  A long answer to my short question but extremely informative.  I never knew there were so many scales for one track gauge.  Thank you for the education.... ;D
Moxie Bootlegger

Andre Anderson

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Re: 2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2014, 05:41:20 PM »
John,

Large scale is one LARGE can of worms.  :o

Andre

Jock Ellis

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Re: 2-foot Equipment for use on G-gauge Track (and scale vs. gauge discussion)
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2014, 11:23:19 PM »
One to 29 is three times the size of HO which is 1:87. Is that by design or coincidence? Makes it easy to scale up drawings from model railroad magazines.
Jock Ellis