Author Topic: W, W, & F Power Point Presentation  (Read 2832 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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W, W, & F Power Point Presentation
« on: December 13, 2008, 05:05:11 PM »
MODERATORS NOTE:
W, W, & F Power Point Presentation has been converted from the pre-July 2008 WW&F Discussion Forum.
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Joe Fox wrote:
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I hvae decided to make a new topic for the power point, so that it isn't under the name, Harry Percival Dedicated event. Here is an outline on what the power point will have in it,

A brief history of the original railroad
A brief history of the founding of the museum
Track-laying progress shots
Car building progress shots
Locomotive restoration shots
Special event shots (Picnic, Halloween, Christmas)
Current status
Possible future goals

Any photos that any body has of these, please send them to me. All shots are welcomed, and I have some from John McNamara, and Frank Knight gave me a link to all of his photos.

Thanks,

Joe

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Joe,   A few years ago I went through all the loose newsletters and papers around the museum.  I found copies of most of our older newsletters which started in January, 1990.   I put them in a black ring binder in the conductor's cabinet in Sheepscot station.  I have been adding the latest issues each time I come up to the railroad.  The collection is arranged by year with the newest to the front.  There are some great photographs (like the first stall of the car shop without doors) in the older issues.   The newsletter was made on a copier the first few years so the photos aren't real clear, but they get better into 1993-94.  The book should be helpful with the early history of the museum.

Joe Fox replied:
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Ok. Thanks Stewart. I will try and find that book tomorrow when I go to the museum, if I am not to busy.

Joe

James Patten replied:
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How's progress on the Power Point presentation?

Joe Fox replied:
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The power point was going great. Up until pictures stopped coming in. So not much progress has been made in a few weeks. I got pictures up to Cockeyed curve during the track laying progress, and cars being built. So I need photos from 1999-present time. When I get more pictures, I can continue. However, people seemed to have lost interest in sending me pictures and things like that.

When is this power point supposed to be completed? I think it should only be 10-15 minutes long instead of being the proposed 30 minute presentation, especially if it is going to go to train shows. How many people will stop by during a 30 minute presentation, when there are other booths to be seen, and if it isn't at a train show, who will actually pay attention to a 30 minute presentation? Just my thoughts that's all.

Joe

John McNamara replied:
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Joe,

My apologies for my part in drying up the photo supply. I'll see what I have that is recent, but I must warn you that since becoing newsletter editor a few years ago, I've been taking fewer pictures myself and just admiring those that Bob Cavanagh, Steve Hussar, and others take. I recommend going through the newsletters, picking some that you like, and then contacting the photographer listed. Be sure to tell them the dates of the newsletter so that they can find the pictures more easily.

I certainly agree that the attention span of a viewer at a train show is less than 30 minutes. It's more like 30 seconds. However, before you select a length, I think that there should be some discussion of the "target audience." I suspect that what you are working on is much too important to waste on a train show audience. The Long Range Plan says that we should have a presentation for "Granges, Masons, Lions Clubs, Rotary Clubs, and histroical societies to name a few." If this is still the Museum's intent, you can probably assume that the viewers will be comfortably seated and genuinely interested in the material, rather than passing by in pursuit of their next train show purchase. Thus, something in the 20 minute range could be appropriate.

-John

James Patten replied:
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While the attention span of a train show passer-by is only a few seconds, you can still run the powerpoint on automatic and people can see the pictures.  At most train shows, we typically run the WW&F video over and over (..and over...and over...and over...).  I've brought my laptop along a few times to the Augusta show and had pictures automatically running through a view program.

The video and the pictures attract people for a few extra seconds, during which time you can gauge their interest level.  Press a newsletter and brochure into their hands at that time.

The average Joe Q. Public railfan won't be terribly interested in our short, narrow gauge museum - they only like the boring broad gauge such as Guilford (blech).  But every now and again you get someone with a little more interest.

gordon cook replied:
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Hey, I think Guilford is plenty exciting. I sometimes stand by our local grade crossing and watch the rails go up and down about 6" when the Ayer-Worcester trains go through. The mud sprays out from under the ties  and it's a real show. Never know when that fishplate might snap.
Seriously, I have a bunch of pictures on my laptop too, (who doesn't these days? ) and would be happy to share any that might be interesting for the presentation.
I will bring my computer up on Jan. 20 if Joe wants to pick some out.

Stephen Hussar replied:
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The Long Range Plan says that we should have a presentation for "Granges, Masons, Lions Clubs, Rotary Clubs, and histroical societies to name a few." -John
A brief Power Point program could also be useful when seeking grant monies from foundations...
_________________
*                *                    *                   *
"Give me enough Swedes and whiskey and I'll build a railroad to Hell."
- James J. Hill

John McNamara replied:
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I guess what I was trying to say is that while we could certainly show the PowerPoint presentation at train shows, I think that the target audience is groups who are sitting down and viewing the PowerPoint sequence as part of an overall presentation about the Museum. Thus, rather than making it super-short so that it recycles quickly for the train show walk-by audience, it should be long enough to tell our story to a sit-down audience who invited us to come make a presentation.

Stephen Hussar replied:
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Understood. I was just visualizing the decision-makers at "Foundation X" sitting down to read "the proposal" and at the same time viewing a PP show that we emailed to them. More and more is being done electronically, and in fact it is rare that I am asked to snail-mail a hard copy of anything!
_________________
*                *                    *                   *
"Give me enough Swedes and whiskey and I'll build a railroad to Hell."
- James J. Hill

James Patten replied:
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It would appear that we have several target audiences.

One is the sit down audience of people expecting a talk on the WW&F: Lions Club, Granges, 470 Club dinner.  In this case, the power point is the visual aspect of a prepared speech.  The power point should not do any of "the talking".

Even within the above group the length of a presentation will vary from a half hour to an hour (or more).

Another is a foundation where we have applied for a grant.  There, we have a short amount of time to impress them with our results and pursuade them we need the money more than others do.  I would think in this instance that the presentation would include a voice over as pictures roll by.

Then there is the train show goer, sampling from a wide variety of things and probably anxious to go find that latest video on Big Railroad runbys, or buy that brass boxcar, or find the rare book on the Stinkville and Western.  Maybe we want a voice over, but probably more likely just a stream of pictures will be fine.

I think what needs to happen is the "long" version of the power point should be developed.  From the long version we create cut-down versions targeted to various audiences.  I suspect anything for a foundation would be custom made, as what we will wanting to do will change from foundation to foundation.

Josh Botting replied:
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I agree that we need several presentations for the various areas.  Keep in mind that after half an hour, even the most interesting presentation will lull most of us to sleep, not to mention exhausting the air supply for most of us (with the exception of BOB C, ofcourse.)

For the shows, I would think we would want more short video typed things.  You know the kind with all kinds of klangs, wooshes, bangs, and whistles........  things which grab peoples attention, & further will cause rail fans to drool excessivly, just at the sound of it.

Dave Crow replied:
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Like Stephen H's excellent videos?

Mike Fox replied:
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I think 20 minutes would be perfect to start with. Then if desired, compress that 20 minutes into a 5 or 10 minute presentation. And if it is longer than 20 minutes, so be it. I'll ride him to get it going again. I haven't even seen any part of it yet so I'll have to preview what he has done.
Mike

Josh Botting replied:
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I also have a bunch of small, 30 secl or so, videos, If anyone is interested I can supply them...

Joe Fox replied:
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Hi Everybody,

Gordon, I will also be at the museum the 20th, so during lunch or something like that I can look through your pictures if you would like.

Josh, I have no idea how to add videos, so when I send the presentation to you, that can be your job.

Talk to you guys later.

Joe
Ed Lecuyer
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