Author Topic: When will we finish with new water tank?  (Read 3143 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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When will we finish with new water tank?
« on: December 13, 2008, 01:21:14 AM »
MODERATORS NOTE:
When will we finish with new water tank? has been converted from the pre-July 2008 WW&F Discussion Forum.
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Dave Olszewski wrote:
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Hi everyone,

It looks like everyone don't care about finishing with water tank and siding on fuel storage shed and want to build new building. Let finish with water tank, siding on oil and fuel storage shed first then build new building like restroom and storage. It is not pretty to see unfinished oil shed and water tank there. How come they stop work on siding at oil and fuel storage shed. It is not pretty to see it from train.

When will we finish with them?

Dave

Stephen Hussar replied:
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Funny you should mention the shingling on the flammables shed. Just last night I was told that (barring terrible weather) it would be worked on over the next few weeks...

James Patten replied:
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Zack had second thoughts about using the tank we now have (because it's rusty and pitted), so his brother's employment will be rolling and welding a new tank for us in the next couple of weeks.  The valves may be incorpated as it is built, I don't know.  Then the tank will have to be treated with some kind of sealant before it is mounted.  I don't know if that means it won't be placed up on the tank platform until warm weather or not, but I suspect not.

Once the tank is up there and piping is connected we can start using it (well OK the wiring trench has to be dug out to the well).  Then we can build the outer shell at our leisure.

Dave Olszewski replied:
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Funny you should mention the shingling on the flammables shed. Just last night I was told that (barring terrible weather) it would be worked on over the next few weeks...

Yes, it is shingling. I can't remember how to spell it. I must have tiny brain.  Thanks for inform me .

It was funny things at my old apartment in Rockland. I lived in Manor house for two year. They worked on new fountain in back of house. Then they stopped it. Then they repaired the canopy on side of house. They pour cement around the post. They were going to put brick on it. Then they stopped it. Then they worked on stair in front. They remove some steps. Then they stopped it. Then they work on yard and other things. They still not finish with them before I leave there last year. Maybe WW&F Railway will  look like it there. Ha, ha. 

Have nice weekend! See you on Dec 9th there.

Dave

Mike Fox replied:
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Dave,
Everybody must think alike. Joe and I were just talking about the water tower the other day. It will be nice to see these projects done. But something of more importance always comes up. I'll see you at the museum.
Mike

Stewart Rhine replied:
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The new steel tank will be finished soon.  Most of it is welded and the top should be added this week.  We now have enough funds for the lumber, etc for the building.  These came from the sale of 10 pieces of spare bog/panel track.

Allan Fisher replied:
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Also remember that one of our Life Members gave a VERY VERY Large gift to fund the finishing of the tank.

Mike Fox replied:
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We should make a small bronze plaque thanking him for such a gift and place it on the completed tank.
Mike

gordon cook replied:
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Can someone elaborate on the progress on the water tank?
I last heard something about the existing tank being corroded and a new one was needed. Has a new one been fabricated? Or did I hear wrong?
Inquiring minds (or as Vern might say, 'nosy people') want to know.

James Patten replied:
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Zack ordered a new tank through his brother's employer, which does that kind of thing (metal fabrication).  Neither Jason nor Zack were too enthusiastic about the old tank, which has corrosion on the bottom sections.  Zack didn't want to build a building around it and then have to have it ripped out a few years later because of leaks.

Wayne Laepple replied:
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I'm wondering if consideration has been given to having a manhole at the top of the new tank and whether the interior will be coated with epoxy to retard corrosion. In future, it may be necessary to clean out the interior of the tank, and a manhole would make it a lot simpler.

Dave Buczkowski replied:
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Make sure it's sized for a real big man as some of us (myself included) have put on a few extra lbs over the years....

Mike Fox replied:
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I think inside that tank would be considered a confined space. That comes with it's own set of rules. And if someone should go in the tank to put epoxy on the inside of it, they should be wearing some breathing apparatus. Don't need to loose any of our good volunteers to epoxy fumes.
Mike

Dave Buczkowski replied:
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Mike earlier in this thread raised the idea of a brass plaque to honor/thank the generous donor of funds for the water tank. This raises an issue I have thought about from time to time, especially whenever I learn of a large gift. I would like the opportunity to thank those personally for their generous gifts to the Museum when I see them or meet them. However, many, if not most of our donors don't seem to want others to know of their beneficence. Apparently modesty and humility are still considered good traits to have in Maine which I not only deeply respect but honor as well. At least one frequent contributor to this forum has been consistently very generous with his wallet though he would never tell you about it unless you cornered him.
That said, should we consider such displays around the Museum or would it be too much trouble and cause bad feelings? Where would you draw the line? Should we just continue the way we have been? And waht about those who give so much of their time nad skills, if not just their money?
Discuss amongst yourselves.
Dave

Wayne Laepple replied:
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I agree the interior of the water tank would be considered a confined space. Nevertheless, it will need occasional cleaning to remove algae. Such growth is absolute death to locomotive boilers. If the interior of the tank is coated with an epoxy, it will be more difficult for the algae to hang on and grow. We may have to pay a contractor to clean the interior of the tank every few years, but that will be much less expensive than a new boiler.

Josh Botting replied:
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The tank would definatly be a confined space.  That will be a big deal.  I would think there should be a bolted access on the sides, as well as on the top.  In the event that we plan on having the tank ventelated for work to occur, in addition to the breathing apparatus.  In a tank of that size, fumes will dissplace the oxygen in the air, thus leading to suffication.  If the tank is not painted, we will need precautions for access as well.  the water will grow stuff, which can make bad stuff.  In addition the real danger of an enclosed steel tank, is that during the corosion process, the steel(iron) reacts with water H20, to become Ironoxide, and release hydrogen, the H2.  This leads to an explosive atsmophere.  We see this all the time in the yard, for the short duration of the stay in a ship, it will develope this process.  Our competitor lost a man in a confined space this summer.  A few years back, a man died, and a boy came close to dieing in a tank in Elsworth, while painting it.

We should be cautious, for with this, we have to few voulenteers to loose one.

gordon cook replied:
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Thank you James, now I think that perhaps Zack told me that but I forgot. Must be the coal gas.
Are we still going to lift it with the post and beam crane that was built?
I wonder if the assumption that it will be enclosed with a steel top is correct? I was under the impression that the steel tank itself would be open at the top. The roof will keep the leaves, needles,  and ducks out and the heat in.
Actually, if the roof could be hinged so it opens up, it could be a giant hot tub, open to the stars! Beats a cold shower!

Josh Botting replied:
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Thats kinda what I figured ....

Stewart Rhine replied:
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The water tank will have a steel top to keep dirt, etc. out.  If the top were open dirt could still fall into the water.  Birds, etc. may get into the tank house so a complete tank is better.

James Patten replied:
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It's my understanding that having the tank's interior pre-epoxied is either part of the deal or something that Zack wants to negotiate.

We still plan to use the crane to place it on the top, but the upright pole may need to be moved.

The tank will come with the valve for the outlet already in place.

Mike Fox replied:
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If the ones that give the generous amounts like that don't want to be recognized, then how about a simple plaque that says Thank you for your donation or Completed due to generous donations or something like that. Those who donated will know who they are and the ones that don't know who donated, won't.
Mike

Bill Sample replied:
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I think Mike has a good idea there.  The plaque could be placed where it could be seen by passing trains and mentioned to passengers by the conductor to promote further donation activity.  It's important that the public is informed on the importance of donations and how they made the railway what it is today and what it will be tomorrow.

jwhoughton replied:
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Working in a Confined Space:

I agree with what others have said earlier about the dangers of working in a confined space.  Unless you have the training, equipment, and oxygen measuring devices don't even think of doing it.  Even a metal tank, with an open top, in the enclosed tank house could be a problem.  After four minutes or so in an oxygen depleated atmosphere brain damage begins  to occur in humans, a few more minutes will cause death.  Worst part is if your working alone you won't know what is happening as you get groggy then pass out so you don't get a warning and can't save yourself.  I nearly lost a coworker this way a decade ago.  My recommendation - hire the work out to an expert.  One that is trained and has the equipment.  Expensive yes, but then your team all live to play another day.

John Houghton
Ed Lecuyer
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