Author Topic: Hillside slide, and more... *PICS*  (Read 3723 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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Hillside slide, and more... *PICS*
« on: December 13, 2008, 01:18:59 AM »
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Stephen Hussar wrote:
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Took this pic a couple of weeks ago during a group walk up to Carleton Stream. It's not a total washout, but the west shoulder of this 100+ year old embankment has slid down the hill taking most of the trees with it.


Stephen Hussar replied:
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Walking another beautiful stretch of the grade. Don't know what anyone else was thinking, but I couldn't help but picture no.9 rolling through here in the not too distant future...

Stephen Hussar replied:
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Volunteer Joe Fox provides scale in this view across Carleton Stream.


Stephen Hussar replied:
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The south approach to Carleton Stream. Museum members pose above a surviving wooden bridge timber.


John McNamara replied:
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For the benefit of those unfamiliar with the "cast of characters," they are Zack Wyllie, Steve Smith, Gordon Cook, Jason Lamontagne, [?], Joe Fox, and James Patten. My apologies to [?], but I expect someone will correct my post.

Stephen Hussar replied:
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Hi John, thats's Dave Olszewski. I really did mean to ID everyone but the phone rang...   

James Patten replied:
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To give everybody perspective on the top picture, where Joe and Zack are standing is approximately the middle of the area where the track would be.  Jason's standing at the west edge of that area.

The picture doesn't do it justice, but the trees slumped away with the embankment.  In the hole is nothing but mud.

Dave Olszewski replied:
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Thanks for posting photos on this website. Also thank for id me there. 

ETSRRCo replied:
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Volunteer Joe Fox provides scale in this view across Carleton Stream.

Wow when I walked to Carleton Stream there was nowhere near that much water in it. I came in from the 218 side of the stream. I walked the other side of 218 and I must say that was a beautiful section of the railroad. Did you walk to Carleton from Alna Center? I would love to do that when I come up in the spring if someone would show me the way. How far up the line from Alna is that slide and that strait clear section?

-Eric
_________________
Eric Bolton
East Tigard & Southern Railroad Co 1889-1958

Josh Botting replied:
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If anyone happened to notice, this morning on the news, Channel 6(2), there was a story on the river levels up here.  They showed the testing of the river in N. Whitefield.  They reported that the level was the highest recorded at that point for this time of year.  Very high....

Mike Fox replied:
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Eric,
If you go to the North end of track, keep walking. It is probably a good mile and a half or more so be ready for it. A very nice stretch to walk through. And can't wait to get there with a train all though it looks like some work to repair the roadbed is necessary before that can happen. Most of the roadbed has a trail on it accept one spot north of Top of the mountain where there was a culvert removed or possibly it was a cattle overpass. No pictures exist of that stretch so one can only guess.
Mike

John McNamara replied:
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Here's another picture (by Bob Cavanagh) of a bunch of volunteers at a brook crossing. In this case, it was Humason Brook on March 20, 1999. About two and a half years later (October 7, 2001), engine 51 was bringing flatcar 118 across a new trestle with a load of ties. So, while Steve's pictures presently look like the "middle of nowhere," we can always hope that history soon repeats itself, i.e. trains in a few years! Left to right: Vern Shaw, Marcel Levesque, Jason Lamontagne, Fred Morse, John McNamara, Zack Wyllie, James Patten, John Robertson.


Joe Fox replied:
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Steve Hussar,

Great shots. Hopefully, the washout should be fine now that all of the trees are gone I hope.

Joe

Josh Botting replied:
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If anyone should happen to look at the pictures of the wreck at trout brooke, it appears that the water level is high like it is now, or at least higher than normal.  I wonder if there was another dam in the river.....

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Or maybe the fallen cars and locomotive impounded the water so the brook looked wider?

Joe Fox replied:
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That is a very good possibility. Does anybody remember what caused the bridge to collapse? I remember reading it in the book Two Feet to Tidewater, however, I have forgotten what it said about it.

Joe

Bruce Wilson replied:
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...and a stylish white duck was then seen to shake debris from his head, quiver a little and yell..."AFLACK!"

Mike Fox replied:
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Another possibility for the water depth now, they logged in there some time ago and drug everything through the brook. Perhaps some debris from that filled it in a little.
Mike

BM1455 replied:
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Hey Bruce....I'm sure that Jason is happy that you have re-introduced the duck to the museum discussion.
Eric Larsen.

Bruce Wilson replied:
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Thanks Eric, but I actually wanted to give Stewart a good laugh. Who knows, perhaps in 2007 Conductor "Web" or Agent "Bill" a/k/a the "Hancock Duck" will re-emerge to haunt JML.

No one has ever taken such a beating from an innocent water fowl as did JML while working on a long ago rail salvage project up in Hancock...

One of Stewart's photos appearing in an issue of Railpace magazine even showed our feathered friend (or his concrete likeness) up in the second floor window of the Sheepscot shop.

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Bruce, Yep - you got me good with Mr. Aflack ... it was LOL time!  Hey, we did have a great time with the "duck tale" back in the day.  Ducks on tree stumps at Davis, inside the train register cabinet and one on the front of number 10 - good times!   

Hancock Maine - a duck free work place.

Bruce Wilson replied:
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Hey Stewart...all this great stuff needs to go into a handbook for benefit of the new guys at Sheepscot. (lol) But in all seriousness, I've noticed that the "old" photos of volunteers at work have drawn considerable interest. The time has sure gone by fast since my own first visit to Sheepscot in 1993. I've been busy researching what Linwood Moody and Richard Andrews wrote about the narrow gage in their days, now the antics of "our gang" need to be remembered.

Dana Deering replied:
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Hey Bruce,

Ask Stewart about his midnight encounter with Sasquatch in a Union Suit.

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Now THAT is one experience I'll not soon forget  Too bad I didn't have my camera to record the beast ...

Sheepscot, it's all summed up in the famous bumpah stickah -
"Life at the Narrow Gauge is O-TAY"
Ed Lecuyer
Moderator, WW&F Forum