Author Topic: WW&F #10 Video  (Read 7287 times)

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: WW&F #10 Video
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2013, 09:01:44 AM »
The engine crew listening to the radio ??  I guess you could do it with a 32volt set but you may have to turn the headlight on to fire up the radio.  It reminds me of the slogan seen on a hat at the Big E Show:

"REAL RADIOS and REAL LOCOMOTIVES have TUBES"

Isaiah,  Sorry to hijack your thread so here's something that may help with your next video project.  The peak years for the WW&F were from 1907 when Carson Peck took over until about WWI in 1918.  As noted before, Ragtime was popular in that era.  You may already know this but some of the best Ragtime music was composed by Scott Joplin.  Scott's music was featured in the 1973 Universal Pictures movie The Sting.  

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« Last Edit: November 07, 2013, 09:51:28 AM by Stewart Rhine »

Isaiah Reid

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Re: WW&F #10 Video
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2013, 07:01:34 PM »
Thank you for the great ideas, the music, the music is a bit out of era, and a bit loud I agree. You read my mind, I was thinking that Scott Joplin's-Pineapple rag would work as well, maybe an updated version later. Thanks!

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: WW&F #10 Video
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2013, 10:31:08 PM »
Just for fun -

For those not familiar with his work, here's one of my favorite Scott Joplin tunes:

Maple Leaf Rag - This is the original version, recorded from a piano roll that was actually played by Scott Joplin.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMAtL7n_-rc



Bill Sample

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Re: WW&F #10 Video
« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2013, 11:35:54 PM »
If you look at some of the later photos of the Albion station, there appears to be some sort of antenna attached to the roof at the north end of the building.  Perhaps the family that resided there had some sort of radio.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: WW&F #10 Video
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2013, 09:26:44 AM »
Good point Bill.  Most radio sets built from the early 1920's into the late 1930's needed an external antenna so it would have been common during the later years of the WW&F to see antennas on homes along the railroad.   Harry told me that in the 1930's you could pick up stations from Boston, New York, Chicago as well as Canadian broadcasts.  That gave New England listeners access to network programs featuring music.  Maine was also a good place for receiving shortwave broadcasts from the UK and Europe. 

As has been noted in other posts, there were many advances in communication during the almost 40 years the narrow gauge served the Sheepscot Valley.  The new technology would have brought music from other parts of the nation and beyond.