Author Topic: Sheepscot Station Lighting  (Read 6473 times)

Robert Hale

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Sheepscot Station Lighting
« on: May 20, 2013, 11:23:45 PM »



What type of bulb is in the green desk fixture?

James Patten

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2013, 07:00:59 AM »
What type of bulb is in the green desk fixture?

A light bulb!   ;D  ;D  Sorry, couldn't resist.

Pretty certain it's the old fashioned incandescent.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2013, 07:21:09 AM »
It's a 65 watt clear traffic light bulb.  The bulb is 130 volt which on a 120 volt circuit gives a softer light than a standard 65 watt. 

Stewart 

Robert Hale

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2013, 09:11:30 AM »
It's a 65 watt clear traffic light bulb.  The bulb is 130 volt which on a 120 volt circuit gives a softer light than a standard 65 watt. 

Stewart 

Ok, I looked up that bulb and can see the filament is shorter than the older bulbs that have the longer filaments. It seems that the bulb is more "white" in color in the photo. For an interior light was it common to use a traffic light bulb or an Edison carbon filament during the early 1900's?

Robert Hale

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2013, 09:14:01 AM »
What type of bulb is in the green desk fixture?

A light bulb!   ;D  ;D  Sorry, couldn't resist.

Pretty certain it's the old fashioned incandescent.
Touché
I'm glad you "illuminated" that subject to "shed some light" on my question.  ;D

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2013, 12:31:34 PM »
Hi Robert,

We have tried a number of bulbs in the hanging fixture and the traffic light bulb worked best for a photo shoot. Yes, it does shed a whiter light.  We have a number of 110 volt Edison carbon filament bulbs with the longer loop filament and they give a nice golden light.  They are better in fixtures without a shade so you can see the bulb. The Edison lamps are hand made by the the craftsman to closely replicate original Edison lamps.  Both types are made in the U.S.A.

The bulbs used in the early 1900's were the Edison, long carbon filament type.

Stewart
« Last Edit: May 24, 2013, 12:34:25 PM by Stewart Rhine »

Robert Hale

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2013, 01:15:26 AM »
Hi Robert,

We have tried a number of bulbs in the hanging fixture and the traffic light bulb worked best for a photo shoot. Yes, it does shed a whiter light.  We have a number of 110 volt Edison carbon filament bulbs with the longer loop filament and they give a nice golden light.  They are better in fixtures without a shade so you can see the bulb. The Edison lamps are hand made by the the craftsman to closely replicate original Edison lamps.  Both types are made in the U.S.A.

The bulbs used in the early 1900's were the Edison, long carbon filament type.

Stewart

I understand why the need for the brighter light for the photo shoot. Now, if you want a really good read that has historical roots look up the history of 60hz. (http://www.sos.siena.edu/~aweatherwax/electronics/60-Hz.pdf). Some of it has to do with Edison carbon filament bulbs. I wonder what they look like at 30hz @130volts.

Richard "Steam" Symmes

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2013, 03:46:29 PM »
This thread is "currently" straying far from the subject.

Steve Smith

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2013, 10:10:07 PM »
Well, the title of the thread includes "lighting," so at the risk of some "static" I'll mention that the lights in the IRT Subway stations in New York City used to have a very noticeable flicker back in the 1930s and 1940s. I don't know what their A-C frequency was, but I think it was considerably lower than 50 Hz, because I've not noticed light flicker in Germany, using 50 Hz.

John McNamara

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2013, 12:46:51 PM »

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2013, 12:32:39 AM »
Steve,
It was 25 cycle. See http://www.nycsubway.org/wiki/Rotary_Converter_Power_Technology
-John
AHH! A HARMONIC of 50hz!!!
(Do not ask me how I know this... I could tell you but then I'd have to- nvm.)

Jock Ellis

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2013, 07:39:30 PM »
Of course, the cycles comes from how fast you spin the generator. Sixty is 3,600 rpm while 50 cycles is 3,000. I work in a GE machine shop that makes blades for the compressor side of gas turbines which drive dynamos.
Jock Ellis

Robert Hale

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Re: Sheepscot Station Lighting
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2013, 11:55:08 AM »
It also depends on how many poles the generator has. 3000/3600rpm is a two pole 50/60hz. Halve that and you get 1500/1800rpm four pole, halve that again 750/900rpm eight pole, 375/450rpm 16 pole generators.