Author Topic: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread  (Read 495522 times)

Mike Fox

  • Museum Member
  • Empire Builder
  • ********
  • Posts: 5,305
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #210 on: December 11, 2012, 06:45:15 PM »
You just like machining. ;D But the sleeves will keep the nuts from binding the angle.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Steve Smith

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 653
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #211 on: December 11, 2012, 10:19:41 PM »
Mike, here is a hastily drawn sketch, photographed with my digital camera, showing two arrangements, one above, one below,  whereby the tapered sleeves would not prevent the nuts from drawing the angle iron tight to the spacer and firebox wrapper sheet. These are supposed to be sectional views formed by a vertical plane passing through the axis of a stud. I don't know whether No. 9 has either arrangement exactly, but it should be something similar. I did draw the tapered sleeves a little wrong. I don't believe they have any shoulder on the straight part of them.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2012, 12:04:14 PM by Ed Lecuyer »

Steve Smith

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 653
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #212 on: December 11, 2012, 11:12:43 PM »
Robert Hale posted a Question
Quote
Will these mounts be treated in some fashion to prevent rust in the future? (between the sandwiched parts and the boiler)

I'm not sure, but I doubt it would be necessary. The right hand counterpart to the mount shown in the pictures I posted is right where the reverse lever pivot and quadrant are located, which will of course be in the cab of the completed locomotive. So the left hand mount will also be in the cab, hence protected from weather.

I do recall from riding on No. 10 that water was being splashed on a balky injector on the fireman's side from time to time, so I guess it's not guaranteed that water wouldn't get on the left-side mount, if, as is likely, No. 9 will have a left-side injector for the fireman.

Brendan Barry

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,013
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #213 on: December 12, 2012, 12:56:39 AM »
I worked on the tank today, removed the two sumps, the outer coal board guides the inner guides are riveted on angle iron and the two wrought iron hold downs for the front of the tank. Squeezed as far into the tank as I could go found a few cubic feet of rodent nest, rust, and some coal. Stewart and I figured the coal has probably been in the tank since the 30's. The inside was painted with black paint over the orange primer in spots I'm guessing this was done in CT and not Sheepscot. Next is needle scaling any skinny volunteers for the interior.
United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Stewart "Start" Rhine

  • Museum Member
  • Trainmaster
  • *******
  • Posts: 2,940
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #214 on: December 12, 2012, 02:09:16 AM »
I think we should save the coal to put in the firebox during the first steam up.  That would be a good connection between #9 running on the original WW&F and the museum.  

Stewart
« Last Edit: December 12, 2012, 09:22:37 AM by Stewart Rhine »

Dave Buczkowski

  • Museum Member
  • Conductor
  • *****
  • Posts: 922
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #215 on: December 12, 2012, 10:36:45 AM »
Excellent idea Stewart!

Ed Lecuyer

  • Administrator
  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,829
    • View Profile
    • wwfry.org
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #216 on: December 12, 2012, 12:09:33 PM »
Jonathan St. Mary asked me to post:

As I'm sure you are aware, Jason and I have been tweaking the big lathe for weeks now, trying to get to the point where we could turn and burnish the journals on the driver axles for #9.

Previously, we showed the counter-counterweights which balanced up the wheelsets.  Since then, we have adjusted the tailstock, fabricated a new headstock center, re-geared the drivetrain to get a much slower feed rate, and fabricated our latest specialty tool, the journal burnisher.  With all the tweaking, Jason was able to turn the journals to an acceptable roundness without an undue amount of taper, and a finish good enough to burnish.  The pics are of our new journal burnisher in use.  It seems like this part of the project has taken forever, but the lathe tweaks will speed up any more work done with the machine.



Ed Lecuyer
Moderator, WW&F Forum

Robert Hale

  • Hostler
  • ***
  • Posts: 212
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #217 on: December 12, 2012, 02:35:27 PM »
Robert Hale posted a Question
Quote
Will these mounts be treated in some fashion to prevent rust in the future? (between the sandwiched parts and the boiler)

I'm not sure, but I doubt it would be necessary. The right hand counterpart to the mount shown in the pictures I posted is right where the reverse lever pivot and quadrant are located, which will of course be in the cab of the completed locomotive. So the left hand mount will also be in the cab, hence protected from weather.

I do recall from riding on No. 10 that water was being splashed on a balky injector on the fireman's side from time to time, so I guess it's not guaranteed that water wouldn't get on the left-side mount, if, as is likely, No. 9 will have a left-side injector for the fireman.

So since this mount will be mostly out of the weather a coat of good paint when assembled should suffice to prevent rust. I just have an eye for these things since I work on airplanes and corrosion is a real issue. Now, for the grease for the sliding plate, what is the type of grease normally used for steam locos?

Keith Taylor

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 720
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #218 on: December 12, 2012, 07:55:11 PM »
I'm not sure paint will last...the wrapper sheet of the boiler gets pretty hot.

Keith

John Kokas

  • Museum Member
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,588
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #219 on: December 12, 2012, 08:07:12 PM »
I would suggest several coats of carbon black powder mixed with warm linseed oil, with a good "baking" between coats.  Worked in the old days..........
Moxie Bootlegger

Steve Smith

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 653
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #220 on: December 12, 2012, 10:37:04 PM »
Jonathan, thanks for the pictures and text on burnishing. Do you move the carriage along the ways with the tool in contact with the journal, or do you do one section at a time, backing off after each zone, shifting carriage and then moving the tool to the work again for the next section.

Jonathan St.Mary

  • Museum Member
  • Gandy Dancer
  • *
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #221 on: December 12, 2012, 10:59:05 PM »
The tool is brought in against the journal at one end, and appropriate pressure applied.  The feed is then engaged, and the rollers move to the other end.  The rollers mash down the peaks from the cutting tool and push them into the valleys.  The result is quite a smooth finish.  A YouTube clip shows the action:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zPkkpH1K1I

Jason M Lamontagne

  • Operating Volunteers
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,627
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #222 on: December 12, 2012, 11:53:31 PM »
What I've learned from that very YouTube clip is that letting the full width of both bearings on the journal doesn't produce a high enough localized pressure to yield the surface finish sufficiently.  As such- the first attempts (made as described above) significantly improved the finish- but didn't approach the mirror you see in that YouTube clip.

Next time I'm there I'll kick the burnisher at a slight angle so just the corner of one bearing engages; the angle will only be slight to give a good entrance angle on the bearing corner, and to keep the force on the bearing mainly radial (and not axial).  Each journal will be done in two set ups; as such the tool Jonathan made Monday (seen in his photos) won't require any modification.

see ya
Jason

Steve Smith

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 653
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #223 on: December 13, 2012, 04:21:03 PM »
Thanks very much, Jonathan and Jason--good explanations. I can see how turning the burnishing tool even a very slight angle will reduce the area of its contact with the workpiece, giving an increase in pressure without having to increase the force with which the roller is pressed against the workpiece. That's making the laws of mechanics work for ya instead of agin ya.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

  • Museum Member
  • Trainmaster
  • *******
  • Posts: 2,940
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #224 on: December 21, 2012, 04:43:28 PM »
This week new brass came in to make driving box bearings.  Jason worked in the shop 3 or 4 days on the project.  Jonathan helped with machine work on Thursday.   Eric S. worked on cleaning the drivers which have now been moved into the machine shop.

Stewart