Author Topic: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread  (Read 500245 times)

John Kokas

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #690 on: December 02, 2015, 02:58:47 PM »
I noticed in several historical photos that #9 had "whitewall" tires.  Is that still planned to be accomplished?
Moxie Bootlegger

Terry Harper

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #691 on: December 02, 2015, 05:12:28 PM »
Please don't do the white walls. That's like drawing a beard on the Mona lisa

Keith Taylor

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #692 on: December 02, 2015, 05:15:50 PM »
Please don't do the white walls. That's like drawing a beard on the Mona lisa
Terry....I am guessing that you (like me) are not a fan of the "American Flyer" look.

Keith

john d Stone

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #693 on: December 02, 2015, 05:32:09 PM »
Really great to see her outside in the natural light! In following the progress over the years, I am simply amazed at how complex the restoration process is. And the fact that there are such talented people available to move that process forward. Fantastic!

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #694 on: December 02, 2015, 05:38:51 PM »
Quote
That's like drawing a beard on the Mona lisa

I think you meant it would be like painting it blue and putting a face on the front.

Thankfully, I suspect that either scenario is as likely.
Ed Lecuyer
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Philip Marshall

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #695 on: December 02, 2015, 07:01:56 PM »
I've seen plenty of photos of WW&F nos. 2 and 3 with whitewall tires (and white rods and crossheads too), but never No. 9. She definitely had whitewall tires on the SR&RL though.

John Kokas

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #696 on: December 02, 2015, 07:36:35 PM »
Not that i'm a huge fan of whitewalls, BUT, if we are to do our restorations as "historically accurate" as so many have insisted on this board, then we really can't pick and choose which parts we want to do accurately. (exceptions made for safety and FRA regs)
Moxie Bootlegger

Ken Fleming

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #697 on: December 02, 2015, 08:01:35 PM »
CHAPTER XXII.  (Sorry drawings didn't come over.)



THE EAMES VACUUM BRAKE.

OPERATION OF THE BRAKE.
THE Vacuum Brake, as the name implies, is operated by means of a vacuum which is formed in the connections that act the part of the cylinder in the air-brake. With an air-brake, compressed air is made to do the work of applying the brakes by moving a piston to which the brake-lever is attached, the air being carried throughout the train by means of iron pipes and rubber hose: with the vacuum brake the work is done in a similar way with similar connections; but, instead of compressed air being forced inside the pipes and apparatus, all the air is exhausted out, and the natural pressure of the atmosphere is made to do the work.

THE DIAPHRAGM.
Under each vehicle of a train, as seen in Fig. 33, a diaphragm is securely fastened which performs the combined duties of cylinder and piston. It consists of a kettle-shaped casting with a loose disk of heavy rubbered duck fastened over its mouth; the center of the disk being provided with an iron plate, through which passes an eye-bolt for forming connection with the brake-lever. The inside of the diaphragm is connected to the pipe which passes along the train, and has its front end connected with the ejector on the locomotive. 

THE EJECTOR.
The position of the ejector in the cut can be clearly seen in Fig, 34, where there is also a diaphragm to be seen under the deck where it is located when used to operate driver brakes. The ejector is operated on the same principle as the water injector, only it is used to lift air instead of water. A cross-section of the injector is shown in Fig. 34. When the engineer wishes to apply the brake, he pulls the handle 41 (broken off in the cut), which opens the valve B49, and admits steam to the body of the ejector A1. The steam rushes upward round the end of the tube 5, its velocity being accelerated in passing through the contracted opening left round the top of the tube. Passing through tubes 3 and 6, the steam shoots up in the form of a column with a hollow base; the tube 5, which is connected with the pipes and diaphragms on the train, forming this base. The effect of the steam passing out under these conditions is to induce a current through the tube 5, which draws up the valve B7, and sucks the air out of the pipes and diaphragms. A vacuum being thus formed in the diaphragms, the atmosphere presses the flexible ends together. This tendency to collapse is retarded by the brake-rod connections, and the latter receive a pull equal to the combined atmospheric pressure on the diaphragm. The brake-levers are arranged to transmit a proper tension to the brake-shoes for making the brake effective. A vacuum gauge placed on the front of the ejector enables the engineer to regulate the power as he wants it. The brake is released by pushing on the lever 24, which opens the valve 8, and admits air into the brake-pipes. The release-valve attachment is sidewise in vertical section cut through the handle, and is put separate for convenience of illustration.

CARE OF THE BRAKE.
The valve B7 of the ejector needs grinding occasionally; and, if the lift should be too great, the valve will hammer the seat out of shape. Sometimes when waste or other fibrous impurities are sucked through the pipe, they stick in this valve, keeping it away from the seat. The valve, is very easily reached by taking off the cap O4. The steam-valve B49 needs about the same care as any other steam-valve, and its troubles are of the same nature. The shoulder at the top of the tube 5, which is used to obstruct the steam, thereby increasing the velocity of the quantity that passes, sometimes gets cut into channels with the fast moving steam striking it. This reduces the promptness of the ejector's action, but it is a form of deterioration that proceeds very slowly. Care must be taken to keep the drip-valves A and B16 in order, otherwise there may be trouble with the ejector throwing water, or freezing up if the engine stands where that apparatus will get cold in winter.

Steve Smith

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #698 on: December 02, 2015, 11:41:24 PM »
Decided to move the post below from the thread re pledges toward the second lubricator for No. 9, to this work thread for No. 9, hoping for a response:

Any chance one of the picture takers could take one showing the discharge end of one or more of those lines (looks like five of them) from the second lubricator? I realize that may be a tall order, owing to things in the way such as drivers, frame members, poor lighting, etc. I'm curious as to how the oil gets from the end of a line to, say, the waste pocket on an eccentric strap.

Also wondering whether the oil feed will be during operation, or perhaps just during stops.

Brendan Barry

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #699 on: December 03, 2015, 09:34:16 PM »
Number 9 was unwrapped today.



Oil line pictures. The valve block takes one feed from the oiler and splits out to four flexible lines to the eccentrics. Each driver bearing has it's own feed line off the oiler.





United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Steve Smith

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #700 on: December 03, 2015, 10:47:58 PM »
Brendan, your photos are great! Very helpful in explaining how the system works. Thank you!

Paul Uhland

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #701 on: December 04, 2015, 12:06:14 AM »
Brendan...Please stop teasing us with these almost-ready-for-steam pics.  ;D 
I can't stand it!
WHEN? 
Paul Uhland

Mike Fox

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #702 on: December 04, 2015, 08:23:49 AM »
It is absolutely amazing how different this locomotive looks now, compared to when it arrived. All the little things add up. I am proud to have been part of it.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Keith Taylor

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #703 on: December 04, 2015, 10:27:21 AM »
Not that i'm a huge fan of whitewalls, BUT, if we are to do our restorations as "historically accurate" as so many have insisted on this board, then we really can't pick and choose which parts we want to do accurately. (exceptions made for safety and FRA regs)
Yes....the Sandy River No.5 had white painted tires. (Or possibly aluminum not white) But There is no evidence, that I am aware of, that the WW&F in the depths of the depression spent any money on fancy paint for the tire edges. From the pictures that I have seen...they didn't spend any money on any paint for the engine except for re-lettering the tender for the WW&F and changing the number on the cab.
Keith

Eric Schade

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #704 on: December 04, 2015, 11:51:13 AM »
Here are some photos from yesterday's hydrostatic boiler testing...


the pressure test setup.  this is a small manual pump used to pump a little water into the already full boiler to raise the pressure to 1 1/4 times the operating pressure. 




Jason crawled into the firebox to look for leaks and check the stay bolts.  he also tapped each with a small hammer and listened for the tone of tightness.


here is Jason working on the throttle packing.
Eric Schade, Phippsburg, Maine