Author Topic: Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection  (Read 6594 times)

Roger Whitney

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Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection
« on: October 20, 2011, 12:09:25 PM »
Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection

   NOVEMBER 10, 1916-  In a letter to the Monson Slate Co. management (now the owners of the Monson Railroad since 1908) Superintendent Morrill advised them that he had traveled to Portland and bought two flatcars and two four-wheeled trailers from Perry, Buxton & Doane, a used equipment firm.
   These were originally numbered 1 and 2 but Monson renumbered them 23 and 24.  But where did they come from?  Lets look at a little northwoods history…….
   The Carry Pond and Carry Brook Railroad (CP&CB) was built in 1911 as a two-foot railroad. It was owned by the Boyd-Harvey Lumber Co. to haul lumber and mostly cedar ties from the Penobscot watershed to Moosehead Lake.  It started at or near Seboomook which is located at GPS 45.880n, 69.736w  in the northwest region of Moosehead Lake. It then followed Carry Brook in a westward direction for several miles and meandered 14 miles up into the Penobscot River watershed.  You can trace some of the railroad row using on-line historical topo maps (http://docs.unh.edu/nhtopos/NorthEastCarry.htm) and Google Earth. 
        A sawmill was located three quarters of a mile from the Moosehead Lake end of the railroad to cut mainly railroad ties.  The ties were then dumped into a three quarter mile sluceway where they were dumped into Moosehead Lake. It ran under private ownership until the last two years, when it was run by the USRA (war administration). Equipment consisted of a dozen flatcars, a number of Portland Co. log trucks and an 0-4-0 ST “dabble tank” locomotive.
   The railroad was dismantled in 1918-1919. However some of the flatcars may have been “surplus” because six became available in November of 1916 and the railroad lasted into the war years.  Why would they get rid of  their flatcars?
        However, sometime in 1919, the railroad equipment as well as the sawmill machinery was loaded on a scow owned by John E. Lamb of Rockwood, hauled by the steamboat VIOLET to Rockwood and unloaded at the MEC wharf at Kineo Station.  The 0-4-0ST was stored for 3 years at Kineo.  According to Mr. Lamb, owner of the scow, the  locomotive “looked like Monson #1 or #2 but had a “dabble Tank”.
   Anyway, another entry states that six flats were unloaded from the “Lamb scow” at Greenville Jct. and shipped out on the B&A to Portland where Morrill heard of them, went down to Portland and bought two of them.  (One source says all 6 were shipped directly to the Monson via the B&A, but I haven’t seen ANY evidence that any more than two were bought by the Monson) The new flats were of heavier construction than what the Monson originally had, and had an additional 2 ton capacity. They were also longer and a little wider. The CP&CB flats were 28’6” long and 6’8” wide as opposed to Monson’s existing flats being 26’ long and 6’6”wide.  The new cars had a  22000 pound capacity and cost the Monson $200.00 each. Morrill seemed delighted to have them! The two trailers were constructed of  hard pine and oak and cost $25.00 each.  They were used to haul waste slate for ballast. 
         Now………… what is a “dabble tank”?  Same as a saddle tank?  A saddle tank two-footer? The ST designation suggests that.  And what happened to the other six CP&CB flatcars?  Anyone know? Maybe it’s all buried in the Maine P.U.C. records of 1918…….
   

James Patten

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Re: Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2011, 03:01:38 PM »
I would have guessed "dabble tank" was a "double tank".  An engine with tanks on either side of the boiler?

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2011, 07:28:03 PM »
I think James may be onto something. The side tanks might have been called double tanks. Baldwin built a lot of engines with side tanks for the logging industry, though most were larger. Does any information about this engine, like a builder's number, still exist? That may help to pinpoint it.

Roger Whitney

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Re: Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2011, 09:29:54 AM »
As far as I know, there isn't any more info on this engine.  However info may be buried deep in the PUC or possibly company report archives, wherever they may be.  There may be pictures floating around Piscataquis County  maybe in the various historical societies.  It would take a lot of digging, but there's got to be some pictures out there.

Cliff Olson

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Re: Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2011, 11:58:33 AM »
I have looked for the CP&CB on my 1954 provisional edition 15' topos (Northeast Carry and Seboomook quadrangles). The maps show a trail following Carry Brook west from its mouth at Moosehead Lake and, after following the North Branch of Carry Brook, heading north in two locations to approximately the middle of Seboomook Lake.  Could this trail be the former ROW of the CP&CB?  I couldn't find a Carry Pond anywhere near this area, although there is a small unlabeled pond in Carry Brook just a couple miles west of the outlet.
I suppose it's also possible that part of the ROW is now the dirt road from the Seboomook turn-off across the east end of Seboomook Lake to Seboomook Dam. Just east of Seboomook Dam is another unlabeled pond.

Roger Whitney

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Re: Flatcars 23 and 24: The Boyd-Harvey Connection
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2011, 02:03:52 PM »
Cliff Olson writes….
“I have looked for the CP&CB on my 1954 provisional edition 15' topos (Northeast Carry and Seboomook quadrangles). The maps show a trail following Carry Brook west from its mouth at Moosehead Lake and, after following the North Branch of Carry Brook, heading north in two locations to approximately the middle of Seboomook Lake.  Could this trail be the former ROW of the CP&CB?”
   Yes, Cliff, I believe that trail is at least part of the old ROW because it follows the contour of the brook for most of its way.

 “I couldn't find a Carry Pond anywhere near this area, although there is a small unlabeled pond in Carry Brook just a couple miles west of the outlet. “
   I think one of those is Carry Pond.  Somewhere in my past I seem to remember seeing an old map with those ponds labeled.

“I suppose it's also possible that part of the ROW is now the dirt road from the Seboomook turn-off across the east end of Seboomook Lake to Seboomook Dam. Just east of Seboomook Dam is another unlabeled pond.”
   I’m not sure, but it would follow that Carry Pond would be part of Carry brook.  This would be a terrific little logging railroad to model in ON30.  Not much for rolling stock, a cute little locomotive from Bachmann …a sawmill kit.  A lot of possibilities.  Cliff, could you e-mail me at rwhitney@svrsu.org?