Author Topic: Albion Diesel request  (Read 12595 times)

Ted Miles

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Albion Diesel request
« on: March 25, 2011, 12:59:49 AM »
Folks,
         I would like to update my equipment roster. Can someone tell me about the "critter" at Albion station?

Is it actually owned by the Historical Society or a private individual?

I understand it is a Plymouth Loco Works product. What year was it built?
Is it 24" gauge or can it be converted to it?

What or where was it working before it went to Albion?

For you other "critter" fans out there the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum has a GE built Model 25 ton Loco which they are converting from standard to Pennsylvania broad gauge which is 5 feet 2.5 inches. Not everybody is narrow minded don't you know!

Thanks for the information.

Ted Miles

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2011, 09:34:55 AM »
Ted;
I can't add much to what you already know. I believe it started life as an industrial switcher in Maine. It was 3 foot gauge but a few years ago the wheels and axles were taken to Dragon Cement and were pressed down to 2 foot gauge. I has a four cylinder gas engine though I'm blanking on the manufacturer. (Red Seal seems stuck in my head) I never inquired about ownership though I'd surmise there isn't a title. If it's in individual ownership my guess would be Carl Buitta. Sorry I can't add more.
Dave

John McNamara

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2011, 12:00:30 PM »
I believe that their Plymouth has a Budda engine.
Contact information for Carl can be found at http://lincoln.midcoast.com/~wwfry/locations/albion.html.

-John

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2011, 12:20:28 PM »
Budda is the name that was circling in my head but wouldn't come out...

Stephen Hussar

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2011, 02:32:48 PM »
Here's a picture of the critter in question:
http://www.northeast.railfan.net/images/ply_flh0.jpg

Keith Taylor

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2011, 04:04:07 PM »
The Buda engine Co. was located in Harvey, Illinois and was purchased by Allis - Chalmers in 1953.
Note there is only one "d" in Buda, should you wish to do an internet search.
Plymouth used several different prime movers including Buda and Hercules. Early Plymouths had friction drives and later Plymouths had a sliding gear transmission.

John Kokas

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #6 on: March 25, 2011, 08:50:51 PM »
Are you sure it's a Buda engine?  As best as my memory goes they made diesel engines and were considered the Cadillacs of diesel engines at one time.  They were very prevalent in Whitcomb switchers.  As far as the company they were still in business in Louisiana up until hurricane Katrina as my son and I were in communication with them regarding parts for restoring a couple of Whitcomb's.  Alas those units are now history.
Moxie Bootlegger

Ira Schreiber

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2011, 09:08:58 PM »
There is a 2' gage Plymouth on display inside Caboose Hobbies in Denver, CO. It is, IIFC, a 1928 friction drive with a Buda engine, gasoline fueled.

Keith Taylor

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2011, 10:03:15 PM »
Are you sure it's a Buda engine?  As best as my memory goes they made diesel engines and were considered the Cadillacs of diesel engines at one time.  They were very prevalent in Whitcomb switchers.  As far as the company they were still in business in Louisiana up until hurricane Katrina as my son and I were in communication with them regarding parts for restoring a couple of Whitcomb's.  Alas those units are now history.
Buda began making gasoline engines quite early and only later went to diesel. The first "Plymouth" engines were built by the Fate, Root, Heath company and came with Buda engines, and also Climax and Hercules engines.
I believe the first Fate, Root, Heath "Plymouth" locomotives were built in 1914.

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2011, 03:14:28 PM »
Quite a few early Plymouths had engines by Climax Engine Co. of Clinton, Iowa. These were very large displacement, slow speed gasoline engines. Climax Engine was taken over by Waukesha in the 1950s. At least one of the Plymouths on the EBT has its original Climax engine, while the other one has a Cat engine complete with pony motor. I believe Strasburg's original Plymouth has a Climax engine as well.

Jeff Acock

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2011, 08:52:55 PM »
The "Red Seal" engine was made by Continental.  Continental engines were used almost exclusively in one class of Plymouth....I want to say the HL series, but could be wrong.  I believe all the other series used other makes, although Continental may have been optional.

Continental engines were highly regarded as industrial power.  They were used extensively in farm equipment (esp. Massey-Harris and Co-op tractors), in Diamond T trucks, in Star cars, in Aeronca airplanes and lots of other things.  They were thought, in the farm community to be among the longest-lasting of all and a good many are still in service.  Interestingly, the Continental Engine Co. is still in existance, as a specialized manufacturer of aircraft engines.

A question posted to the Yahoo "Railcritters" group could probably get definitive information on the Albion Critter.
J
« Last Edit: April 01, 2011, 08:54:46 PM by Jeff Acock »

John McNamara

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2011, 10:19:56 PM »
Carl Buitta, who is working on the Plymouth at Albion, told me it was a Buda.

Speaking of Continental engines, isn't #51 powered by a Continental?

-John

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #12 on: April 02, 2011, 06:45:01 AM »

Yes,  #51 has a 6 cylinder Continental engine.

Stewart

Mike Fox

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2011, 07:25:43 AM »
Hmmm. I'll have to look that Brookeville over again. I always thought it was a 4 cylinder.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Ira Schreiber

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Re: Albion Diesel request
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2011, 07:37:08 AM »
Having done some work on #51's prime mover, it is a Continental Red Seal 4 cylinder.
This same engine was used to power the a/c units on early Greyhound(and other) buses. They were mounted in the baggage
compartments. I know, as I used to own one of these Greyhound buses.(PDM4103 for teh purists)
« Last Edit: April 02, 2011, 09:40:50 PM by Ira Schreiber »