Author Topic: World's luckiest Track Inspector  (Read 9309 times)

Stephen Hussar

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James Patten

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2011, 06:35:56 PM »
Acrobatic fellow.

Mike Fox

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2011, 06:47:21 PM »
Holy cow. Hope he brought clean undies to work with him that day, 'cause he needs 'em.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2011, 05:45:43 PM by Mike Fox »
Mike
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Craig "Red" Heun

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2011, 07:32:07 PM »
Time for a New Job

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2011, 05:11:21 AM »
Seen that one before...
 :o STILL freaks me out tho. :o

Wayne Laepple

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2011, 08:34:20 AM »
This one's been around for a while, and two people have suggested to me that it's a very good Photoshop job. In addition, an Amtrak track inspector I know (who inspects track on a part of the Northeast Corridor on foot every day) has also said he thinks it's a fake. According to him, when a track inspector is inspecting switches, a second inspector is assigned to watch for approaching trains and warn him.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2011, 08:37:12 AM by Wayne Laepple »

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2011, 08:41:31 AM »
Wouldn't track have to be placed 'out of service' by the dispatcher for any worker to be on the railroad?

Keith Taylor

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2011, 09:13:34 AM »
Wouldn't track have to be placed 'out of service' by the dispatcher for any worker to be on the railroad?
Not necessarily. First off he was just "inspecting" the track not working on it. And secondly, even if he were "working" on the track they would only take the track being worked on out of service. As that is multiple track territory there would still be trains allowed on the adjacent tracks.
Keith

Dave Crow

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2011, 12:02:14 PM »
Jason, there are different types of track access permits and roadway worker protection.  You can have Track Out Of Service or you could have Flagman/Watchman protection.  Activities, such as inspections, are typically done under the flagman/watchman arrangement.  A lot of railroads don't like to have "Lone Worker" requests, due to the risk of the person being engrossed in his job that he doesn't pay attention to his surroundings.  There are also rules prohibiting cell phone use within a certain distance of the track; again, so that the worker is not distracted.

Stephen Hussar

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2011, 03:19:41 PM »
I've looked at this over and over. I've done a fair number of "blue/green screens" in the last 20+ years and there are several things going on in this clip that would be quite difficult to create. I'm not saying it couldn't be done, but if it's fake it was done with a very high level of expertise. So the question is, why would someone bother spending the kind of money necessary? Who's the audience for this?

Watch the shadows, they're perfect. Watch the inspector's hard hat fly off his head and come to rest up against the left rail. If this were a fake, the hard hat would travel right through the rail and keep going to the left.

On the other hand the resolution of the clip is very low, which could be intentional and presented that way in order to hide detail...

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2011, 06:19:58 PM »
I did some 'research' (ahem Googling) and came up with this explanation as to it being a fake:
http://dexsoft.com/blog/?p=64

I'm no expert on camera angles and lighting, but it seems plausable to me.
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Craig "Red" Heun

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2011, 08:10:49 PM »
I think he was on the grassy knoll in Dallas in November '63 also

Stephen Hussar

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2011, 11:46:29 PM »
Hmmm, sounds plausible, but I'm not convinced. I don't see much if any variation in the angle of the sun. Also, the shadow of one train "not" falling on the other is easily explained by the low resolution and/or the low quality of the camera involved. When an object is over-exposed such as the left hand train is, the shadows won't even render -they'll be "blown-out" and appear non-existent.

 

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: World's luckiest Track Inspector
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2011, 04:17:30 AM »
I agree with Steve. Just the shadow angles alone aren't enough to convince me. The shape of the objects must be brought into question. Different shaped objects are going to cast different shadows, and the resolution make the shadow of the man a bit more difficult to measure than that of the trains. Also, the shadows looked fine to me for two trains beside each other at the same time of day.
Also, the question of the man's reaction time and speed, well, weird things happen sometimes.
And last, for the sound of the trains, how many times do we hear "Operation Lifesaver" tell us that we won't always hear a fast, quiet train like the Accela?
The one thing I have to give weight to is: if he's a RR employee, should he not have more of a clue to the schedule?
Granted, (I believe the clip is from Germany) overseas RR companies may have different or more lax procedures, but again, sometimes freak things happen.
Eh,.. even if it's fake, who cares. It's STILL a good reminder for safety.