Author Topic: A few stories ...  (Read 268336 times)

Paul Uhland

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #345 on: May 09, 2016, 12:41:21 AM »
I remember seeing the original.
One take.
Not a slip of the tongue.
Jack Webb couldn't resist a tiny smile.

The audience went wild!
Excellent Classic TV.
Paul Uhland

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #346 on: May 13, 2016, 09:45:52 PM »
Story #127   On time delivery?

During the last photographers excursion the schedule called for an afternoon freight to TOM and return.  The Spring Work Weekend started the following day so the train crew decided to set a flatcar out at AC to have gravel loaded that would be used on the north yard.  Earlier, there were scenes at AC with #9 bringing the train through while Randy Beach's 1920 Dodge Brothers touring car and the railroad's 1930 Model AA truck were parked near the depot or driving on the Averill Road.  Museum members were in period dress so the scenes were authentic.  That afternoon the northbound train set the flatcar out for loading and then ran to TOM for a photo shoot.  

The AC crew started loading the flatcar as soon as the train pulled out.  No sooner had the train cleared the north yard limit when headlights were seen coming down the Averill Road.  I was on the tractor and Randy was standing next to his Dodge when we noticed the vehicle, a FedEx box truck driving slowly down the road.  The driver came down and stopped just short of the crossing.  He sat there for a moment with his flashers on, looking around at the narrow gauge track, Randy's automobile, the wooden flatcar, Model A truck and our period clothing.  Randy walked over and the driver asked "what is this place?" with obvious confusion.  Randy told him about the WW&F and invited him back for a train ride sometime.  He said thanks and drove back towards 218 and the 21st century ...  
« Last Edit: July 21, 2016, 11:48:11 AM by Stewart "Start" Rhine »

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #347 on: June 07, 2016, 02:35:06 PM »
Story #128

A while back we heard a story describing how fast the WW&F ran in the old days:

A newlywed couple boarded the narrow gauge in Wiscasset, by the time they reached Albion, their son helped carry their bags.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2016, 11:49:28 AM by Stewart "Start" Rhine »

Keith Taylor

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #348 on: June 07, 2016, 02:50:45 PM »
A while back we heard a story describing how fast the WW&F ran:

A newlywed couple boarded the narrow gauge in Wiscasset, by the time they reached Albion, their son helped carry their bags.
That reminds me of a story my father used to tell. He was stationed in Newfoundland for part of the Second World War. The local railroad was The Newfoundland Railway, a narrow gauge line. He told a story about the conductor on the train bringing his three legged dog to work with him. The dog, as the story goes, would get bored at the slow pace of progress and he would hop off the train and hobble on three legs to the next grade crossing where he would wait for the train to catch up with him!

Keith

Ira Schreiber

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #349 on: June 07, 2016, 03:30:05 PM »
Everyone was amazed when the "Cannonball Express" arrived at the depot five minutes early as it was always notoriously late.

It was then discovered it was yesterdays train.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #350 on: June 07, 2016, 05:58:07 PM »
The joke about the WW&F came from a long time Alna resident who heard it from his father.  It's the type of saying that followed shortlines and narrow gauge operations all over the country.  Posting it here reminds us of how important the railroad was to people 100 years ago, important enough to generate humor.

Here's one that I heard about the Maryland & Pennsylvania RR (Ma & Pa) years ago:

A very pregnant lady stops the conductor as he walks through the coach.   She asks "Sir, will this train ever get to York?"  He looks at her and says "Ma'am, why did you ride the train in your condition?"  She replies "I wasn't in this condition when I got on the train."  

 
« Last Edit: June 08, 2016, 06:41:26 AM by Stewart "Start" Rhine »

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #351 on: June 22, 2016, 02:49:24 PM »
Story #129   Honk -

Last Saturday the 1:30 train had just left Sheepscot and I staged the railcar at the south end of the main to run as the second section with two passengers.  The steam train had just rounded Davis curve when a car with PA plates pulled into the parking lot.  A fellow got out and walked over towards the depot.  I said "sorry, you just missed the train but there's time to get a ticket for the railcar"  He smiled and said "the railcar is why I stopped by".  He purchased his ticket and climbed into the front seat.  There were still a few minutes before our departure so I asked him where he lived in PA since I spent a lot of time there when I lived in northern Maryland.  He replied that he lives in King of Prussia.  I told him that our Executone voice mail training center was in that area and I had been there a number of times.  He said "it's a nice area, been there about 30 years but I'm not originally from Pennsylvania, I grew up in Colorado".  I asked if he had lived near any of the Colorado narrow gauge lines and he said he lived outside of Denver.  He added "I like the Colorado narrow gauge lines.  I especially like the galloping goose and have ridden one, that's why I wanted to see your railcar".  I smiled and said "well, the Model T is not as big" then I asked where he had taken a goose ride figuring that it was on the Cumbres & Toltec or at the Colorado Railroad Museum.  He said "it was a long trip, the trestles at Ophir were really high".  It took a second to sink in ... my passenger had ridden a Galloping Goose on the Rio Grande Southern.  I asked him when he rode the RGS and he said that his father had taken him in 1951.    
« Last Edit: July 21, 2016, 11:53:29 AM by Stewart "Start" Rhine »

Carl G. Soderstrom

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #352 on: July 08, 2016, 01:45:52 AM »
Just wanted to say a friend was at the Museum June 25 with his grandkids

He was very impressed with the dedication of the volunteers and what has been accomplished.

The kids (beside the train) rode the hand car from the car barn to the shop - the girls were so
enthused it was a good thing there are brakes on the car or they would have gone through the shop.

Thanks to the crew from him (and me) for making it a memorable experience.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #353 on: July 08, 2016, 11:30:07 AM »
Hi Carl,

 The weekend crew is happy to hear that your friend enjoyed his visit to Sheepscot.  Thanks for letting us know and for the kind words.

Start


Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #354 on: July 28, 2016, 01:36:58 PM »
Story #130   Vision -

Last weekend a visitor named Henry came to Sheepscot to fulfill an interest. Henry told us that he has lived out of state for decades but lived near Bridgton when he was a child.  He remembered a day when he was riding with his mother in the family auto as they were driving through town.  He described it this way: "Being small, I stood up on the seat for a look around.  I looked over and saw some railroad cars that got my attention.  I asked my mother if I could go play on them but she said no, it was not safe since the railroad had shut down.  I was some disappointed at not being able to go look at them and they were gone by the time we took our next trip to town."  He said that at the time he didn't know what narrow gauge was and found out later that it was the B&H.  He added "I never forgot seeing the cars and I've wanted to visit a Maine Two-Footer for years.  My son told me about this place last year and promised that we would visit on the next trip to Maine so here we are.  It's nice that this time I can ride the narrow gauge instead of just seeing it through the car window."   

John McNamara

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #355 on: July 28, 2016, 03:46:06 PM »
...and he will soon see a B&H car!

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #356 on: July 31, 2016, 08:33:51 PM »
Technically, if he saw the visiting caboose he DID!  ;)

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #357 on: August 07, 2016, 08:35:39 PM »
Story #131   The Saw Mill -

Note: The story was told by Tom Albee, grandson of Mr. Everett Albee.

In the early years of the 20th Century, Mr. Everett Albee owned a farm that was adjacent to the WW&F Railway's Alna Center station.  He had a good relationship with the railroad as he shipped milk on the line.  One day Mr. Albee was contacted by the railroads freight agent regarding a piece of equipment that was being shipped on the narrow gauge.  The agent advised that there was a saw mill rig on a flatcar in Wiscasset and the shipper wanted it unloaded at Alna Center but didn't have a crew to unload it.  Mr. Albee agreed to unload the mill and the agent advised that the flatcar would be in the next days northbound train.  Arranging the meet was important as the saw mill had to be unloaded on the mainline while the train waited because there was no siding for a set off.

The following morning Mr. Albee took his horse team down to the station to meet the train.  He set some blocking to pull the rig onto and had the crew spot the car north of the station.  Mr. Albee tied his team on and pulled the rig off the car in a few minutes.  With his task complete, he said goodbye to the train crew and took his team back to resume the farm work.

A few days passed and no one showed up to claim the saw mill.  One afternoon there was a knock at Mr. Albee's front door.  Upon answering, Mr. Albee was surprised to see the Sheriff on his front steps.  The Sheriff greeted him and asked if he had unloaded a saw mill from a flatcar.  He stated that he had and told him him where it was.  The Sheriff told him that the rig was stolen and that they traced it to Alna Center by the railroad way bills.  The two men went down to the field so the Sheriff could examine the mill and make a report.  After confirming that the mill was the stolen rig, the Sheriff made arrangements with the WW&F to have an empty flatcar on the next southbound train.  He asked Mr. Albee to bring his team down the following day to reload the saw mill.  Mr. Albee did as requested and loaded the mill back onto the car.  It is doubtful that Mr. Albee ever received any pay for his work but it is known that he was happy to have helped solve a crime.   

Steve Smith

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #358 on: August 07, 2016, 11:03:50 PM »
What a great story! Thank you Start and thank you Tom Albee.

Philip Marshall

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #359 on: August 07, 2016, 11:52:16 PM »
That is a remarkable story. I wonder, where was it stolen from, and by whom? I'd imagine a stolen sawmill would be a difficult thing to hide, but shipping it to a rural flagstop would be a clever way to keep it hidden for a few days at least until the coast was clear.

It reminds me of those stories about freight agents intentionally routing carloads of lumber around the country by the most circuitous route possible in order to give the lumber company more time to find a buyer for it -- better to keep the wood in transit indefinitely (and hidden from the market) than to let it pile up unsold at the mill.