Author Topic: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*  (Read 87990 times)

Richard "Steam" Symmes

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Re: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*
« Reply #105 on: January 19, 2013, 09:29:02 AM »
That's good to hear.

But by the same token, we don't want them to end up like the Maine Central #470.  It's not in much better shape, and it's in the middle of civilization, not in the Allagash wilderness.

Where would the funding to restore the locomotives to a minimal cosmetic level and build a structure over them come from?  Who would do the work?   Once done, how would they be protected from vandals?  I could see an unprotected building being the target for a fire.

Short of stationing someone on the "property" 24/7, how safe would they be?

Richard

Terry Harper

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Re: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*
« Reply #106 on: January 19, 2013, 06:05:56 PM »
Hello Richard,

A open sided pole barn would be the cheapest route. The bigest expense would be the roofing and prep & paint materials for the locomotives themselves.
we are talking about stopping or slowing down corrosion rather than replacing metal - that can come later.
What we have found out is if it looks appreciated then usually there is little vandalisim. Most people who visit the locomotives want to go there
and appreciate what they are seeing. That doesn't mean there are not idiots - any thing is possible.

As for funding - its surprising how these locomotive attract support. During our work ties, crushed stone and many other items were donated. We also
worked it out with the Bureau of Parks & Lands so we would provide manpower, engineering and special equipment, they would supply housing, food and
logistic support.

The original estimate was close to $500,000.00 to hire contractors to perform the work.  The final cost of the project to the State of Maine was about $32,000.00
Again, it takes some one with the time an energy to organize and push it. Unfortunatly I am not in a position to do that anymore. But... hopefully, once I get
settled into the new carrier that my change.

This past fall a group rebuilt a section of the Tramway - again most of the materail was donated and the volunteers provided the manpower.


Andrew Laverdiere

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Re: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*
« Reply #107 on: January 19, 2013, 06:15:57 PM »
Has anyone considered contacting the reserve units of the Navy Seabees or Army engineers to help with skilled manpower? I spent a couple of years drilling with the Seabees out by Boston, and a job like this would have been right up their alley.

Richard "Steam" Symmes

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Re: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*
« Reply #108 on: January 19, 2013, 06:33:48 PM »
Just as the Marines built the trestle for the WW&F?

This area is a lot more remote. Just how close is the nearest viable road to the actual site?  What is the nearest town and how far away is it?

This place is definitely on my "bucket list", but I'd want to go in there with someone who's been in already and knows the way.

The section of the tramway looks great. Kudos to all involved.
Richard

Terry Harper

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Re: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*
« Reply #109 on: January 19, 2013, 07:53:48 PM »
For the project the Army Reserve Engineers out of Dover Foxcroft delivered the stone to a site behind the Crows Nest Campsite.
It was from there that we moved it by snowmobile across Chamberlain Lake to Tramway.

The closest you can drive is 2 miles. Building a shelter is all about logistics. I would prefabricate everything, label disassemble than move to the site during the winter
or float it from Johns Bridge on a raft or cut-down pontoon boat (if the AWW agrees). The most daunting task is putting in the footing but it wouldn't be to had to move a small
tractor or one of those trailer monuted backhoes in during the winter. Moving heavy stuff in the winter is fairly easy.

Same with a compressor. Its not impossible...just takes thinking out of the box... how else couldwe have moved 150 yards of crushed stone using pickle pails and snowmobiles!

Bill Sample

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Re: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*
« Reply #110 on: January 21, 2013, 08:13:22 AM »
I visited the locomotives about 15 years ago, apparently well after the enginehouse fire.  I noted that a number of relatively heavy pieces were missing off the locomotives - steam air compressor and smokebox door come to mind.  Don't know when the items were taken or by who but it must have been a difficult haul out of that location.
Richard, you are most correct to be concerned about security.

Terry Harper

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Re: Eagle Lake & West Branch *PICS*
« Reply #111 on: January 21, 2013, 09:49:34 AM »
The air compressors are still on them but the smokebox doors and the stack to No. 1 were stollen. We removed the injectors durint the project
and when put covers over the smokebox, capped the stacks and installed a new one for No. 1. When the headlight was installed we tried to make it as
vandal proof as possible. Most of the damage is usually done in the winter when access is easy via snowmobile.

Usually kids who get board watching Dad become stupid drunk while ice fishing