Author Topic: Why weren't the 2-6-2's preseved?  (Read 32934 times)

Matthew Gustafson

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Why weren't the 2-6-2's preseved?
« on: November 04, 2008, 11:30:19 PM »
Why? :( :-\
« Last Edit: November 22, 2008, 06:37:02 PM by Matthew Gustafson »
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Matthew Gustafson

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2008, 11:32:31 PM »
Like Sandy River #24 a 2-6-2 built By Baldwin in 1935!
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Matthew Gustafson

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2008, 11:33:55 PM »
Sorry I Ment the 2-6-2's Not 2-8-2's! Sorry for the Mix Up? :-[ :D ;)
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o anderson

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2008, 01:00:19 AM »
Hello Matt,
You ask a very good question.  I too wish that one or more of the larger engines from Maine were preserved.  In fact, one was, for a short period of time.  This was Sandy River #24, which was purchased by a local doctor.  At the time this was the Great Depression, a period in the 1930s, after the "Roaring 20's" when there was a lot of stock market speculation and then, in 1929, a great collapse of the market.  After that, companies which were operating in a hand-to-mouth kind of manner began to starve for income from diminished freight and passenger traffic.  All of the railroads in America were effected, and small shortlines, many little trolley lines, and the Maine two footers were destined to failure.  You see, when you start to research why where no 2-6-2s preserved, you will find out a lot more about American history.

Well, the guy who bought old #24 was probably affected by the depression like everyone else.  His family might have been very angry at him, having to scrape by to survive while he bought this big old piece of iron and put it in their yard.  The engine was later scrapped.  Its too bad, but at least he tried.

You know, I think we are all lucky that some bigger 2' gauge engines have survived anywhere.  There are a couple engines that were in Africa, some of them have moved up to England.  There are also several still in Brazil, and one or two in Mexico.  It is my hope we can rebuild one of the larger Baldwin engines, from parts, and have it in Maine once again.

Here is some more info on #24:
http://www.roundhouse-eng.com/srrl24/

Best regards,
O. Anderson

James Patten

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2008, 08:20:53 AM »
If you want big impressive 2-foot gauge engines that operate, you'll have to go to Wales and ride behind some of the Beyer-Garratt's on the rebuilt Welsh Highland Railway (Caernarfon).  Or behind some of the Double Fairlie engines on the Ffestiniog (smaller, but no less impressive).

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Why Werent The 2-6-2's Preseved?
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2008, 09:43:40 AM »
I think that at some point a new 2-6-2 will be built by one of the Maine Two Foot museums.  It would be a large expensive project but it's not out of the question.  SR&RL 24 would be real nice at Phillips, especially if they get across the river to the original station. 

I vote for WW&F #6.  That was a beautiful engine. 

Steve Klare

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2008, 12:38:20 PM »
I think none of the tender engines were preserved because of where they were used. Only two of the lines used tender engines. WW&F #6 was a burned out hulk at the time that line went under and had almost zero chance of being chosen for preservation (#9 was at least repairable, and #8 was derailed and vandalized). All the rest were on the SR&RL, but 1936 was quite a few years before Linwood Moody came prospecting for Edaville, so the years that #24 needed to be discovered and preserved were years too many.

Ellis Atwood and Edaville are the key to preservation of the Maine Two Foot relics, there would be very,  very little left if he didn't gather it together, and the couple of pieces of equipment he didn’t preserve have been better off because if all else failed they’d fit in with the rest of his collection. The thing is he didn't start gathering until the 1940s so Engines from lines scrapped before then had a lot of Depression era years when the price of scrap iron was attractive to stay in one piece.

The B&H and the Monson survived the depression, neither had Prairies (or needed them), but both lines had their engines preserved, even if it took Linwood Moody tracking the Monson Engines all the way to Rochester, New York. Had either had a Prairie, it would probably be with us today.

I often imagine had SR&RL #24 made it to Edaville, she would probably have spent a lot of time in the shed. She was a lot of engine to haul short passenger trains on pretty level track. Eliis Atwood would have certainly preserved her, but maybe beyond the peaks and certainly on Railfan Day she would have had a pretty leisurely life.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2008, 12:45:04 PM by Steve Klare »

Matthew Gustafson

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2008, 01:14:13 PM »
I Like The Idea On Rebuilding a Working replica of #24! Is There any surving Blueprints of #24 so we can rebuild it?  :)
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Eric Bolton

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2008, 03:38:49 PM »
I do not know about the 24 but I do know that a full set of drawings survive for the big SR&RL #23.
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Paul Horky

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Re: Why Wernt The 2-8-2's Wenrt Preseved?
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2008, 06:30:19 AM »
The reason why the #24 was scraped I heard was that the town or county tried to impose some kind of tax on the good dr.. Never have heard why? Maybe someone can shed more light on this.

Stephen Hussar

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Re: No 24's brief reprieve...
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2008, 01:01:47 PM »
Here is another frame (actually 2 frames woven together) taken by Gus Pratt in 16mm, showing the shed which briefly housed No 24. The story I've heard most often is that the town decided to tax this structure...and thus the locomotive was sold for scrap and the shed demolished.


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Re: Why weren't the 2-6-2's preseved?
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2008, 07:49:45 PM »
And during the time the good Dr. had the loco, the U.S. was going through the great depression. I am sure that had something to do with it, as well as the tax they were trying to impose (btw, that's the first I've heard of it). Too bad though, that would make an awesome addition to the Sandy Rivers collection.
Mike
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Steve Klare

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Re: Why weren't the 2-6-2's preseved?
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2008, 10:03:38 PM »
That shed seems proportioned too short to house #24, never mind with with her tender too. (would have to be like 20 feet tall!)

Love that 16mm, Stephen!

Mike Fox

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Re: Why weren't the 2-6-2's preseved?
« Reply #13 on: November 30, 2008, 03:50:05 PM »
I think the angle is throwing the length off. It has the right width. Possible the tender was kept in the lean to style building behind the new one.
Mike
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Matthew Gustafson

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Re: Why weren't the 2-6-2's preseved?
« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2008, 06:53:36 PM »
Man if only we had a time machine we would have stop him from scraping #24 and to keep holding on to her so someone but the scrap dealers to buy the engine.   :( :( :'(
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