Author Topic: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread  (Read 390062 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #600 on: February 11, 2024, 02:38:19 PM »
BUILD LOCOMOTIVE 11 – FEBRUARY UPDATE!

The Build 11 team was back for our February 4-6 work session. Harold Downey, Joe Monty and Rick Sisson completed hot bending the lead truck pedestals using our flanging machine. The shorter bends were performed during the January work session. These components will be machined to ready them for assembly.


Lead truck pedestals



Harold is fine tuning the pedestal bend

Meanwhile, Harold finished machining the rear truck swing link hanger castings. These are mounted to the top of the rear truck transoms and support, through the swing links, the spring plank.



Machining the swing link hanger castings

During the time between work sessions Alan Downey machined the poling pocket castings. These will be mounted on either side of the pilot beam.


Poling pocket castings

Alan Downey also machined the rear truck center plate which will be bolted to the bolster. Joe Monty drilled mounting holes in the spring plank.



After a morning of preparation Harold, Rick, Jason Lamontagne, Gordon Cook and Dave Buczkowski were able to rivet the rear truck assembly. Harold had developed a pneumatic buck which we used to back up each rivet as it was driven. This truck assembly uses 24 rivets which were done in one day.




Riveting the rear truck. Harold is operating the pneumatic buck.

Once the riveting was done we test fit the rear truck assembly. Gordon had brought up the swing link pins that he made in his home shop.



Meanwhile, Noah MacAdam has been busy in his home shop machining the lead truck bearing boxes and rear cylinder heads.


Lead truck bearing boxes


Rear cylinder head

Noah has started work on the crosshead guide assemblies utilizing the precision milled bar stock we recently received. His next step will be to machine the spacer blocks that capture the crosshead guide ends and mount to the rear cylinder heads and guide yoke.

Our 2024 fundraising off to a great start! To date we have received $8,737 (17% of the $50,000 goal for 2024.) Remember, you can still donate directly by check to the museum, use a credit card to donate through the gift shop, PayPal, or you can go to build11.org
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Brendan Barry

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #601 on: February 29, 2024, 09:13:16 PM »
The driving wheel centers, two counter weights, and the patterns were picked up from foundry in Springfield, MA today.

The big pallet is the patterns and two wheel castings up against the cab.



Wheel castings











Counter weights







United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Gordon Cook

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #602 on: February 29, 2024, 09:35:14 PM »
Thank You Brendan !!! ;D
Gawdon

Keith Taylor

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #603 on: March 01, 2024, 07:54:22 AM »
I’m curious, on the castings I see several notations of “sand inclusions.”
Will this affect machining?

Keith

Gordon Cook

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #604 on: March 02, 2024, 12:27:26 PM »
The notations are the result of x-ray inspection of the castings to insure there were no areas that were porous or otherwise weak.
The issues found were small and not in critical stress areas and the castings passed all the tests that we required for acceptance. We don't think the sand inclusions will affect any machined areas of the parts.
We're really pleased with the quality and response of this foundry, located in Springfield, MA.
Gawdon

Keith Taylor

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #605 on: March 02, 2024, 01:17:15 PM »
The notations are the result of x-ray inspection of the castings to insure there were no areas that were porous or otherwise weak.
The issues found were small and not in critical stress areas and the castings passed all the tests that we required for acceptance. We don't think the sand inclusions will affect any machined areas of the parts.
We're really pleased with the quality and response of this foundry, located in Springfield, MA.

Thanks Gordon!

Keith

Bill Reidy

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #606 on: March 02, 2024, 09:50:50 PM »
Brendan unloading the truck today at Sheepscot following the trip to Springfield, MA.
What–me worry?

Ted Miles

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #607 on: March 04, 2024, 01:35:41 PM »
The February work looks wonderful! Those drive wheels are a very important part of the the locomotive.

I just sent in my first Build 11 contribution for the year; I am retired so I can not do a lot, but every little bit helps to
meet the year's target! Ted Miles retired but likes the WW&F 11

Bernie Perch

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #608 on: March 05, 2024, 07:10:38 AM »
Would it be possible to see photos of the various castings without all the packing?

Bernie

Gordon Cook

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #609 on: March 07, 2024, 07:19:06 PM »
Sorry, they are still packed on the pallets, so a clearer picture isn't available.
We're sending everything over to Mountain Machine in Auburn so we had not planned to uncrate them.
They will machine and assemble the lead and main drive axle assemblies.
Gawdon

Bill Baskerville

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #610 on: March 07, 2024, 09:20:14 PM »
We're sending everything over to Mountain Machine in Auburn...
They will machine and assemble the lead and main drive axle assemblies.
Does this mean that they will do the quartering?  I remember the effort it took to quarter 9 during the rebuild.  It took invention of an amazingly complex machine by our mechanical engineer to accomplish that.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2024, 09:21:58 PM by Bill Baskerville »
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Ed Lecuyer

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #611 on: March 11, 2024, 08:57:46 PM »
Build 11 - March 2024 Update
The Build 11 team was back for our March 5-7 work session.

We had a number of team members working on projects during the March 5-7 work session: Harold Downey and Rick Sisson used our flanger to complete all the bending operations described in the captions. Harold also machined the 180 degree bends to finished dimensions. Rick, Bob Longo, Jason Lamontagne and Joe Monty fabricated the tooling required to bend the spring staples and spring hangers. Quentin Bethune and Gordon Cook kept our lathes busy.

Meanwhile, between the February and March work sessions, Harold Downey machined the lead truck pedestal surfaces to fit the lead truck radius bars and journal boxes.

One goal of the March work session was to compete the 180 degree bends on the ends of the lead truck lower radius bar and the rear truck arch bars. This mutli-step process entailed 1) heating and bending each bar 90 degrees in our flanger, 2) reheating the bar, clamping it in the flanger and striking the end with a sledge hammer to increase the bend to roughly 135 degrees and 3) reheating the bar and “squishing” it in the flanger until the full 180 degree bend is achieved.



Heat # 2

After hot flanging the bar to 90 degrees Harold is reheating the bend so that it can be extended.



Harold is "fine tuning" the lower radius bar.

Actually, Harold is extending the 90 degree bend closer to 135 degrees so that it can be flattened in the flanger, here being used as a giant vise.

 

Heat # 3

The 180 degree bend is complete. We performed a total of six 180 degree bends this session.

Harold machined the 180 degree bends in the lower radius bar to the finished dimension on our vertical mill. He also machined the arch bar bends to the finished dimensions.



Another goal of this work session was to form the lead truck spring staples and spring hangers, indicated by blue text, below:



We fabricated separate bending forms (anvils) for each and realized the process we had envisioned wasn’t going to work. We then fabricated a keeper that our flanger could press down on the material (secured to the anvil) to bend our material to conform to the anvil while keeping the two legs parallel.



The spring staple bending form on the left; the keeper on the right.

 

(photo taken during spring hanger tool fabrication)



Joe Monty fabricating our tooling.

 

Bob heating the spring staple bar stock; Rick is ready to move the material with tongs.

 

Harold and Rick are clamping the spring hanger material to the anvil.



Forming a spring staple.



Finally - 2 spring staples and 4 spring hangers after hot forming. One of the spring hangers is shown sitting on its anvil. These components will be cold formed in our flanger to ensure precise 90 degree bends.

Although we spent 2 days fabricating the tooling to produce just 6 components, we are extremely pleased with the resulting parts. This investment in time and talent paid off handsomely for us.

Meanwhile, Quentin Bethune was able to bore the wheel centers for the rear truck axles using a clamping fixture fabricated by Jason Lamontagne. This was painstaking work that will ensure a precise fit. Quentin was able to complete 4 wheels in just two days work.

 

Boring the rear truck wheel center.

Gordon Cook started to use our Victor lathe, was setting up some work and the lathe refused to resume operation. Gordon studied a schematic diagram stored in the machine and while tracing the wiring with Brandan Barry’s help found 3 loose wires, which he suspects were not properly connected at the factory.

Our 2024 fundraising is continuing! To date, we have received $ 11,486 (23% of the $50,000 goal for 2024). Remember, you can still donate directly by check to the museum, use a credit card to donate through the gift shop, PayPal, or you can go to: build11.org

Thank you from all of us for your continued interest and support!
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Bruce L. Colburn

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #612 on: March 13, 2024, 04:18:09 PM »
The computer generated illustrations of the lead truck for No. 11 (two illustrations so far) are very detailed and technically complicated.  They do leave me with an unanswered question: is there any lateral, side-to-side movement of No. 11's pilot truck or are the axle and wheels locked in alignment with the drive wheels.  A 2-6-0 model steam locomotive in HO or O gauge would have its pilot wheels swing wildly, which probably wouldn't serve much purpose in guiding the locomotive smoothly through tight curves.  The illustration of No. 11's lead truck show what look like pivot points where it attaches to the frame under the cylinder saddle.  This would mean possible lateral movement.  However, there is also shown a round column, which I don't know the name of, that protrudes upward from the center top of the truck through the front pilot deck.  This would seem to inhibit any side-to-side swing of the truck.  There is my conundrum: does it swing?  Is it fixed?  Is it allowed to swing just a little?    Help***
Bruce Colburn

Bill Baskerville

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #613 on: March 13, 2024, 09:55:50 PM »
Bruce,
I am not an expert, but in layman's terms there are lead truck swing links that appear to allow the truck axle to move left or right when entering a curve, this is pivoted from under the cylinders.  This exerts a force in the direction of the curve which pulls the locomotive drive wheels in that direction.  A similar design is on car trucks which allows the wheel sets to move left or right under the pivot point while exerting a force to center the car over the rail center.  I hope my understanding is somewhat correct.

Look at the color graphic on page 40 just above the bottom of the string of messages.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2024, 09:59:23 PM by Bill Baskerville »
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Ed Lecuyer

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #614 on: March 13, 2024, 10:32:44 PM »
Here's a (greatly) simplified example, courtesy of Lionel Trains...
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