Author Topic: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread  (Read 321547 times)

Keith Taylor

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #360 on: April 01, 2015, 06:24:39 PM »
Perhaps an air tank could be put in side the pattern locomotive Carl is speaking of so it could be powered by compressed air.  It could then shuffle around the yard.  Just a whimsical thought.  The patterns you and your dad make are true works of art.  I enjoying looking at them and marvel at your accomplishments.
Bill...that would be impractical. Basically you don't need to make the same number of patterns as the number of parts. As an example, you only need one drive wheel pattern as you can use the one pattern four times.
Keith

Rick Rowlands

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #361 on: September 24, 2015, 09:02:12 AM »
I have been in the foundry business off and on for many years, and now I am restoring a 23" gauge Porter 0-4-0T, Jones & Laughlin Steel No. 58.  Three weeks ago I brought both of those interests together when I cast a new set of grates for the locomotive at an iron pour that we held at the Carrie Furnaces National Historic Landmark in Rankin, PA, just outside of Pittsburgh.  We are ramping up a metal arts program at the site and over the winter will begin construction of a foundry building.  By next summer we will have the ability to cast grey iron and ductile iron up to about 7,000 lbs.  We will also be able to cast bronze.  Much of our work will be art pieces, but my interest is in creating a location where castings for historic restoration projects could also be made.  We will be producing all of the castings that we need for our railroad, including the wheels.

I am confident that we could produce all of the grey iron, ductile iron and bronze castings for the WW&F 11 project, do it at a cost substantially less than what a commercial foundry would charge and with the same quality.  I have worked at foundries producing iron castings from 100 tons down to a couple of pounds using both no bake and greensand.  I've also operated my own iron foundry business making reproduction parts for gas engine and tractor enthusiasts. 

Carrie Furnaces NHL is a former US Steel blast furnace plant, once the major iron producing facility for the now demolished Homestead Steel Works.  The furnaces could each produce over 1,000 tons of molten iron per day that was converted into steel and rolled into I beams, channels, plates and armor plate.  It is now a major tourist attraction in the Pittsburgh area.  We are restoring the J&L 58 in the blowing engine house and have intentions of constructing several hundred feet of track on which to operate the locomotive when it is finished.

Just something to think about as you plan your WW&F 11 build.  Click on the below link and advance through the photos of the making of the grates as well as builders plates.  I made one plate out of bronze and four more out of iron, working from an aluminum reproduction plate that I changed the construction number on.  The grate pattern is about 100 years old and part of the collection at the WA Young Foundry & Machine Shop, a complete turn of the century lineshaft driven machine shop that is also under our care. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33523379@N03/21477577788/in/dateposted-public/

Rick Rowlands
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J&L Narrow Gauge Railroad
Youngstown, OH

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #362 on: September 24, 2015, 12:40:37 PM »
Hi Rick,

I'd definitely like to chat with you privately if we could.  I'm busy at the moment but hope to establish an email conversation soon.  Thanks for reaching out,

Jason

Bernie Perch

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #363 on: September 24, 2015, 02:44:54 PM »
I have been following your work on other sites.  Alan Downey and I have been making patterns for the #11 project for years and they have been shown on this site.  I would love to see some of these castings made so the actual construction of the locomotive could begin.  I am also working on a whistle project where I will need the parts cast in a high pressure steam bronze.  Will you have that capability?  Would you also be able to cast a complex three chime flat top whistle bell in a horizontal plane?

Bernie Perch

Rick Rowlands

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #364 on: September 25, 2015, 08:08:20 AM »
Bernie,  I've always enjoyed making the more complex castings, as it take a bit of patience and some out of the box thinking to get the cores to stay where they need to be and get the gating and risering right.  I can try anything, and if it doesn't come out just throw it back into the furnace and try again.   As long as the alloy is available in ingots we should be able to melt it in the crucible furnace.

Rick Rowlands
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J&L Narrow Gauge Railroad
Youngstown, OH

Bernie Perch

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #365 on: September 25, 2015, 05:10:36 PM »
I am going to PM my email to you to discuss this fully.

Bernie

Rick Rowlands

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #366 on: November 19, 2015, 11:08:33 PM »
An organization that I am involved with, Rivers of Steel Heritage Corp., owns a 1900 era lineshaft driven machine shop located in a small town along the Monongahela River about 60 miles up the river from Pittsburgh, PA.  It is the WA Young Foundry & Machine Shop, and most of the machines inside are operational.   With the desire to build No. 11 using techniques that were available around the turn of the last century, we would be able to offer the use of WA Young for the production of some of the components needed for No. 11. 

The shop is equipped with a varied assortment of machine tools, including a lathe that can turn 30" (or maybe larger), a 30" x 6' planer, drills, milling machines, smaller lathes, and a 200 ton horizontal wheel press. All are flat belt driven and are original to the shop.   In the adjacent room is an iron foundry with a 22" cupola furnace and a coal fired crucible furnace for making brass castings.  I spoke with Jason today about WA Young and the possibility of doing some work here.    One of the goals of Rivers of Steel is to make WA Young useful again.  I have been doing some limited machine work down there and reactivating machine tools as I go. 

The Historic American Engineering Record documented the facility and this is their survey:
http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa2222/

I also have an album of photos of Young here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33523379@N03/albums/72157648586082640

Rick Rowlands
Chief Engineer
J&L Narrow Gauge Railroad
Youngstown, OH

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #367 on: November 20, 2015, 09:14:19 AM »
Rick,

That's a nice shop with lots of good equipment.  We like the old flapping belt shops and have all the parts to build a shingle mill with the lineshaft system.  Thanks for posting the links.

Start

Philip Marshall

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #368 on: November 20, 2015, 10:20:36 AM »
Hi Rick,

What a beautiful shop! Thank you for posting these pictures.

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #369 on: November 20, 2015, 11:10:41 AM »
I had a great chat with Rick yesterday, and believe partnering with his many efforts in PA will hold tremendous benefit for our projects- and hopefully meet some of his needs as well. 

Jason

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #370 on: November 20, 2015, 11:13:32 AM »
And- what a FABULOUS shop at Young; I hope to see the No 11 project blended there and here, and that some of our members might show up there to help when the time comes.  Great possibilities...

Jason

Wayne Laepple

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #371 on: November 20, 2015, 12:22:34 PM »
The Young facility puts me in mind of the East Broad Top's shops, as well as the old shop at Cass, which burned in 1972. The EBT's facility included its own iron and brass foundry as well. I can't recall if Cass had an in-house foundry. I'll looking forward to a visit to Young sometime.

Rick Rowlands

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #372 on: November 29, 2015, 11:52:11 PM »
I was down at WA Young today.   While I was there I took a short video of the shop, basically showing the extent of the machine tools and other equipment that are there.  The radial drill has not drilled a hole in many years, but today we used it to drill a couple of 3/4" holes in two smokebox door dogs that I had to make for J&L 58. 

We were also looking at the coal fired crucible furnace that is in the floor.  We plan to test fire it sometime over the winter, and hope to have it ready to melt bronze in preparation to some casting work to do in the spring. 

The planer has a 32" x 10' bed, and the big lathe has a 40" swing with a maximum workpiece length of 16 feet.   There are various jib cranes located in the building to move heavy workpieces off and onto the machines. 

Anyways, here is the video: https://youtu.be/9cSW9KQWIoY
Rick Rowlands
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J&L Narrow Gauge Railroad
Youngstown, OH

Paul Uhland

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #373 on: December 03, 2015, 09:11:48 PM »
A co-op arrangement with the Young shop looks like the exact element now needed to get the 11 build started.
And I'm sure Rick has a few experienced hands  from the Youngstown/Pittsburgh area, along with WW&F guys,  who could help.

Looking forward to a fascinating journey toward 11's steamup.
Imagine...WW&F a three-loco road in the near future.   ;)
Paul Uhland

John Kokas

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #374 on: December 03, 2015, 09:51:16 PM »
Wow!  What a cool shop.  And still all there which is so rare these days.  It would be great to see parts of #11 being created but I think there might be a just as pressing need to make some more passenger car and freight car trucks for existing and future equipment.  With #9 coming back online and now with our ability to accommodate tour buses we're going to need more WW&F (reproduction) passenger cars.
Moxie Bootlegger