Author Topic: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread  (Read 375197 times)

Wayne Laepple

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #345 on: March 27, 2015, 07:54:22 AM »
I am just absolutely gobsmacked at the ingenuity you and your dad use to solve problems, Alan. You two make it all look so simple!

Mike Fox

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #346 on: March 27, 2015, 08:10:35 AM »
Nice work
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #347 on: March 27, 2015, 08:23:05 AM »
Alan;
I am in awe! Your work should be in a museum! Oh, wait, it will be...
We are so fortunate to have you as members. I look forward to seeing you and your father in Sheepscot again.
Dave

Dave Crow

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #348 on: March 27, 2015, 08:26:17 AM »
Awesome piece of work!  You guys have been so clever in figuring out how to make the patterns; the castings should be much easier!

Dave Crow

James Patten

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #349 on: March 27, 2015, 09:02:00 AM »
Really nice.  The photo of the unturned barrel looks like a gatling gun.

Stephen Hussar

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #350 on: March 27, 2015, 09:26:35 AM »
Phenomenal!! Really enjoying seeing these different items take shape, thank you!!
SH

Ira Schreiber

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #351 on: March 27, 2015, 02:40:45 PM »
Absolutely awesome.
I could not assemble a balsa wood airplane without the wings falling off  !

Philip Marshall

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #352 on: March 27, 2015, 05:10:24 PM »
Wow, I'm impressed! Absolutely beautiful work, Alan.

By the way, coopering a set of staves and then turning the hexadecagon/octagon/whatever down to a tapered cylinder on a big lathe is exactly how wooden masts are made for tall ships. Your intuition led you to the right answer!

-Philip Marshall

Alan Downey

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #353 on: March 27, 2015, 07:13:44 PM »
Thank you for the compliments! I hope these posts that we do aren't too wordy. Some of my favorite posts to read on the forum are the ones about the creative solutions people come up with for the wide variety of problems that come up at the museum. I also just like to show that as weird as pattern making seems to be- it's not magic. And I hope that seeing some of the problem solving might encourage others to give it a try.
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Paul Uhland

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #354 on: March 29, 2015, 11:17:22 PM »
Alan...absolutely amazingly first-rate design and work, the usual for you, and your dad.
IMHO you can explain and show your processes all you want. 
Bravo!  :D
Paul Uhland

Carl G. Soderstrom

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #355 on: March 31, 2015, 12:19:44 AM »
Is this where I suggest that a full size outline of #11 be erected painted somewhere and the
beautiful patterns mounted in their proper locations?
It should be where it can be seen by the public and the huge amount of work appreciated.
(Buy a piece of a pattern?)
If the pattern is to be used more than once it will have to be in a climate controlled environment?
This may be something down the road but I think it would make money if it does not cost too
much to  set up.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2015, 09:59:02 AM by Carl Soderstrom »

Bill Baskerville

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #356 on: April 01, 2015, 06:39:47 AM »
Perhaps an air tank could be put in side the pattern locomotive Carl is speaking of so it could be powered by compressed air.  It could then shuffle around the yard.  Just a whimsical thought.  The patterns you and your dad make are true works of art.  I enjoying looking at them and marvel at your accomplishments.
~ B2 ~ Wascally Wabbit & Gofer ~

Keith Taylor

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #357 on: April 01, 2015, 05:24:39 PM »
Perhaps an air tank could be put in side the pattern locomotive Carl is speaking of so it could be powered by compressed air.  It could then shuffle around the yard.  Just a whimsical thought.  The patterns you and your dad make are true works of art.  I enjoying looking at them and marvel at your accomplishments.
Bill...that would be impractical. Basically you don't need to make the same number of patterns as the number of parts. As an example, you only need one drive wheel pattern as you can use the one pattern four times.
Keith

Rick Rowlands

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #358 on: September 24, 2015, 08:02:12 AM »
I have been in the foundry business off and on for many years, and now I am restoring a 23" gauge Porter 0-4-0T, Jones & Laughlin Steel No. 58.  Three weeks ago I brought both of those interests together when I cast a new set of grates for the locomotive at an iron pour that we held at the Carrie Furnaces National Historic Landmark in Rankin, PA, just outside of Pittsburgh.  We are ramping up a metal arts program at the site and over the winter will begin construction of a foundry building.  By next summer we will have the ability to cast grey iron and ductile iron up to about 7,000 lbs.  We will also be able to cast bronze.  Much of our work will be art pieces, but my interest is in creating a location where castings for historic restoration projects could also be made.  We will be producing all of the castings that we need for our railroad, including the wheels.

I am confident that we could produce all of the grey iron, ductile iron and bronze castings for the WW&F 11 project, do it at a cost substantially less than what a commercial foundry would charge and with the same quality.  I have worked at foundries producing iron castings from 100 tons down to a couple of pounds using both no bake and greensand.  I've also operated my own iron foundry business making reproduction parts for gas engine and tractor enthusiasts. 

Carrie Furnaces NHL is a former US Steel blast furnace plant, once the major iron producing facility for the now demolished Homestead Steel Works.  The furnaces could each produce over 1,000 tons of molten iron per day that was converted into steel and rolled into I beams, channels, plates and armor plate.  It is now a major tourist attraction in the Pittsburgh area.  We are restoring the J&L 58 in the blowing engine house and have intentions of constructing several hundred feet of track on which to operate the locomotive when it is finished.

Just something to think about as you plan your WW&F 11 build.  Click on the below link and advance through the photos of the making of the grates as well as builders plates.  I made one plate out of bronze and four more out of iron, working from an aluminum reproduction plate that I changed the construction number on.  The grate pattern is about 100 years old and part of the collection at the WA Young Foundry & Machine Shop, a complete turn of the century lineshaft driven machine shop that is also under our care. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33523379@N03/21477577788/in/dateposted-public/

Rick Rowlands
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Youngstown, OH

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #359 on: September 24, 2015, 11:40:37 AM »
Hi Rick,

I'd definitely like to chat with you privately if we could.  I'm busy at the moment but hope to establish an email conversation soon.  Thanks for reaching out,

Jason