Author Topic: Mystery machine...  (Read 6996 times)

Stephen Hussar

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Mystery machine...
« on: February 28, 2010, 10:06:03 AM »
Not really a mystery, and purported to be the world's largest...but can anyone guess what this is?  ;)




Mike the Choochoo Nix

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2010, 10:16:40 AM »
At first one would say a band saw.  If it is, it's not the biggest, the sawmills on the west coast had bigger ones.
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Ken Fleming

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2010, 10:19:56 AM »
Yup! Its a very big band saw for sawing lumber.

Stephen Hussar

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2010, 11:04:51 AM »
You guys are good...but I wouldn't expect anything less from this group!

The blade, which I couldn't get a shot of because it was behind locked doors, looked to be 30 or so ft long and possibly a foot wide! This plaque on the machine describes the saw as being capable of angled cuts...so does that make this a gigantic "compound" or "mitre" bandsaw?  ;)


Paul Horky

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2010, 03:12:29 PM »
This machine while not the biggest bandsaw to be built may well be the biggest ajustable saw. The sad thing about this is that the ability to adjust the saw has been lost as the equitment to do the adjustment has been removed. The old picture shows this apperatous which is the large C shaped piece sticking out over the table. To bad!

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2010, 04:02:18 PM »
And I thought it was the world's largest penny crushing machines like you see at amusement parks...

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2010, 12:48:39 PM »
Nice saw but I thought the "Mystery Machine" was the Scooby Doo van   :-\

Jock Ellis

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2010, 10:24:56 AM »
Where is this? Maine, I suppose since they are known to build boats there. Anyone else interested in sailing?
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Stephen Hussar

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2010, 07:46:49 PM »
Sorry, I found this while scouting locations in the old Charlestown Navy Yard -adjacent to Boston Harbor.

Stephen

Dave Rossi

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2010, 03:15:21 PM »
The saw in the pictures Steve took (Great pic's BTW!), is not the saw described or pictured on the plaque....  I can't see a tilting mechanism in Steve's photos.  My guess was this machine was in the building alright, but  was used for an operation called "re-sawing" where giagundo trees were turned into flat sided keels, or planks were sliced from larger stock. What leads me to believe that is the presence of the roller sitting behind where the blade would be leaving the top blade wheel.

What is described and pictured in the plaque is properly called a shipsaw, as you can see from this link: 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jehvicvbc/1087308234/        (The picture is missing the bottom blade wheel and the floor mount casting.)   The work table on a shipsaw does not tilt  (As they do on all modern bandsaws.). The wheels and the blade tilted as a unit, so big heavy pieces of wood would stay put on the horizontal of the table, and not slide off. The tilting track is the big cast "C"

How much wood would a wood duck duck, if a wood chuck could chuck wood?

Dave Rossi

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Re: Mystery machine...
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2010, 03:27:41 PM »
And yes, a shipsaw will not only do compound and mitered cuts, it will also do a miter on a curve, like the bowstem.