Author Topic: Check out this 2' in Mexico  (Read 4364 times)


Bill Piche

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Re: Check out this 2' in Mexico
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2009, 03:42:02 PM »
From what I understand about Edaville history, Fred Richardson and Nelson Blount went down to Mexico to see about getting a few engines like these to make over into extra motive power, but nobody was selling at the time.
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Glenn Christensen

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Re: Check out this 2' in Mexico
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2009, 07:06:24 PM »
NICE, thanks for posting the link Ira!

Those are the first contemporary photos I've seen of old Cordoba & Huatusco #2!  I had heard that she was being moved back to Cordoba for display, but didn't realize this had already happened.  It's great to be able to see for myself.

Hi Bill,

The way I had heard the story, Nelson Blount sent someone down to Mexico to find this very locomotive after the Mexicano branch where she ran, previously the C&H, was closed.  The impetus for this trip may have been the need for more motive power after Edaville obtained the RR operating concessions at Freedomland and Pleasure Island.  J, David Conrad's book lists the 12 as being donated to Edaville in 10/1959, which is the correct timeframe.  Unfortunately, Blount's representative got there too late to snag #2 and came back with #12 (a 2-8-0) from the FCM's 2'6" Zacatlan branch instead.  

After #12 arrived, some have theorized that she was either too heavy or couldn't handle the curves at Edaville so the locomotive went on display by the engine house instead.  There can be no question that #12 went on display at Edaville, but I'm not sure I believe that the factors of weight or curvature fully explain the decision.  Consider that at 41-tons the loco is only 3-tons heavier than B&SR #8.  She does have a longer fixed wheelbase (9'10"), but this may be minimized by having blind center drivers (not sure this is the case).  I *DO* know that #12 is operating very successfully on the numerous sharp curves and rail sizes used on the Alder Gulch line in Montana.  If you've seen the videos, you'll know what I mean.  

What I think decided the matter is that the locomotive that later became Edaville #5 - and ultimately WW&F #10 - was purchased as a cheaper alternative to rebuilding, regauging, and operating the much larger Consolidation.   Consider, the beautiful little 12-ton Forney would require less cost maintain and could be shipped back and forth between Carver and Wakefield for shopping far more easily than could a 41-ton Consolidation.

But whatever the reasons, while I would have loved to have seen #2 operate at Edaville, #10 has been the perfect locomotive for the WW&F for the same reasons that she was the perfect locomotive for hauling the 3-car trains at Pleasure Island.  The way things have turned out has really proven to be a blessing in disguise - even if we *DO* have to wait a while yet to see another 2' gauge tender engine running in Maine.


Best Regards,
Glenn
« Last Edit: December 30, 2009, 07:09:02 PM by Glenn Christensen »