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The Maine Narrow Gauges (Historic & Preserved) => Archives (Other Maine 2ft) => Topic started by: Ed Lecuyer on December 21, 2008, 07:49:14 PM

Title: One Small Bridge
Post by: Ed Lecuyer on December 21, 2008, 07:49:14 PM
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Mike Fox wrote:
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This bridge was located about 1/4 mile north of the Hancock Brook Arch. It has got to be the smallest bridge I have seen. I did not have a tape measure with me. This is the second spot I could have used one. But by counting the 8X8s that make the new deck, my guess is about 4 feet.
Mike
(http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-11/1225939/Smallbridge1.jpg)
(http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-11/1225939/Smallbridge.jpg)

Bruce Wilson replied:
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Nice posting Mike, great photos too...!
Have you seen the (slightly larger) granite block abutments just north of the former Sandy Creek station site?

Mike Fox replied:
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You mean the ones by the transfer station? Yes. Several times. I want to go out there and take a picture of them. I also am waiting for another dusting of snow so I can take some pictures of the old coal trestle on the Harrison Branch. I think with a little snow, the details will stand out better.
Mike

Bruce Wilson replied:
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Mike,
Yes...the stone work just to the south of the transfer station.
Going to try to do some Bridgton exploring tomorrow. Will let you know if I find anything...
Bruce

Duncan Mackiewicz replied:
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Mike,
There is another beautiful set of abutments in the middle of the Lakeside Pines campground down by North Bridgton.  I camp there every summer and that is where I first learned of the 2 footers.  I have walked that stretch of the Harrison branch from there back into Bridgton.  Not much to see since much of the right-of-way is now part of the roadway to summer cottages.  Another nice spot is on the right-of-way between the transfer station and the new Hannafords.  There are two sets of abutments in there.  I've taken great pics of both.

Duncan Mackiewicz replied:
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Mike,
I'd be happy to share those pics right now but I'm unable to figure how to load them onto this site.  Can you share your secrets?
Duncan

Mike Fox replied:
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To share them here you need to set up a "host" for your pictures. For free, you can go to villagephotos.com, and start your own account. That is where I have mine. They allow you so many pictures a month. Once you get set up and find the link to upload your pictures, select the picture or pictures you want to load and load them. Then copy the URL for the picture you want to post on this site. After your text in the message body, click the Img button at the top. Paste the URL for your picture then click the Img button again.It will look something like this
(http://yourURLhere)
You will have to play around to get used to it. If you need more help, Steve Hussar has typed up instructions of how to do it also. Here is a link to his discussion of this. http://www.setbb.com/wwfmuseum/viewtopic.php?t=65&mforum=wwfmuseum (http://www.setbb.com/wwfmuseum/viewtopic.php?t=65&mforum=wwfmuseum)    He explains things better than me I think.
But NE Rail is free also. And no special accout required.
Mike

Mike Fox replied:
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Duncan,
That campground is only 15 minutes from me and I've never been there. Time for a quick trip.
Mike

Duncan Mackiewicz replied:
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Mike,
If you go there it will be long ago closed for the season.  You might have to stop in at the owners' home and ask permission.  Jerry Ducette is a great guy and he likes the 2 footers too so permission should not be an issue.  The main restrooms for the campground are in the former station for the homes in that area.  The right-of-way is as straight as an arrow right down the middle of the campground and it continues a short distance beyond before there are homes and yards obstructing passage.  As you know, I'm sure, there are other spots along the old main road to North Bridgton Station and Harrison beyond the campground where the old roadbed and some bridge abutments can be viewed.
Darn, now I'm getting myself worked up for another look-see but I'm too darn far away to do that.  Guess I'll have to settle for pics on Nerail for now.
Duncan

Mike Fox replied:
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Duncan,
Which place is theirs? The forecast is still no snow so maybe one day next week I can stop over that way.
Mike

Dana Deering replied:
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Don't forget the bridge over Willette Brook just south of Sandy Creek, another set of impressive stonework!

Duncan Mackiewicz replied:
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Mike,
Go to the driveway with the big sign that says "Lakeside Pines Campground".  Follow the driveway to the right in front of a low stone wall for about 50 feet then turn left and follow the driveway down into the woods.  About 300 to 350 feet in on the right you will see an old brown house that has been converted to the campground office and on the left is a modern looking gray home.  That is the Ducette's home.  I am fairly certain there will be someone there who will allow you to view and take photos of the row and bridge abutments.  Heck, they might even show you where they are.
Duncan

Mike Fox replied:
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Thanks Duncan. And yes Dana. Also am going to get the Stevens brook on the Harrison Branch. I think it's Stevens brook anyhow. Where the steel beams used to go across until a few years ago.
Mike

Duncan Mackiewicz replied:
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Dana,
Is that bridge the one on the right-of-way that heads toward Hancock Pond from Sandy Creek? If so, it is indeed an impressive pair of abutments.  I almost took my truck across the makeshift bridge that was across those abutments.  Fotunately I was "smarter than the average bear" that day and wisely drove all the way to Hancock Pond then doubled back all the way to the abutments from the opposite direction.  What a nice trip that must have been in the day.  I especially liked deep cut.  It looks now just as it did in the vintage pictures of the B&H from a hundred years ago....except with lots of trees now.