W.W.&F. Discussion Forum

WW&F Railway Museum Discussion => Whimsical Weirdness and Foolery => Topic started by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on July 22, 2013, 09:47:06 AM

Title: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on July 22, 2013, 09:47:06 AM
The other day we had some visitors who engaged us in a lively conversation about Maine life.  We asked where they were from and they replied "Portland".  At that point there was some discussion of Casco Bay and things to do along the waterfront.  When we mentioned the Eastern Prom and Maine Narrow Gauge there was a blank stare.  After a monent of silence the guests clarified things - they were from Portland, ... Oregon.  Oh, that explains why they didn't know some of Maines' largest citys better known attractions.  

There may have been a bit of a lauguage barrier.  So, to help with understanding all things Maine, here is a guide for folks from away;

AYUH - usually means "yes" but it's also what you ask for when you go to the fillin station with a flat tire.

HAHBAH - a safe place for fishamen when the ocean is all riled up.

CAH - as in: pahk the cah in Bah Hahbah, or Model T railcah.

WICKED - can be said at almost any occasion, usually followed by the words "big" or "good"

LOBSTAH - favorite food of Mainahs and rusticatahs.

MOWAH - as opposed to less.

Hope this clears up a few things.    
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Wayne Laepple on July 22, 2013, 10:02:46 AM
Ayuh....
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Richard "Steam" Symmes on July 22, 2013, 11:42:10 AM
And remember, there's no R in the word water.  It's "watah".
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: James Patten on July 22, 2013, 11:59:40 AM
All the Rs that New Englanders drop roll down to Texas, where they pick them up and use them in places they don't belong.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Alan Downey on July 22, 2013, 02:09:34 PM
James,

I resent that accusation! Besides, we're just trying to make up for ya'll not using them enough!
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Mike Fox on July 22, 2013, 08:14:19 PM
Mowah.....That's what we use to cut the grass....Ayuh
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Richard "Steam" Symmes on July 22, 2013, 08:33:52 PM
Enough!  Next thing we'll be quoting some of the "Bert and I" stories.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Andrew Laverdiere on July 22, 2013, 09:19:04 PM
Mowah.....That's what we use to cut the grass....Ayuh


Paul! The mowah needs mowah gas!!
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: James Patten on July 23, 2013, 06:54:56 AM
Enough!  Next thing we'll be quoting some of the "Bert and I" stories.
Buht and Aye went down t' the docks at six o'clock in the munnin....
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Keith Taylor on July 23, 2013, 11:24:19 AM
I lived here for years before I figured out that "shewa" meant sure!
And that New Hampshire town was BERlin, and not BerLIN.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on July 23, 2013, 11:47:16 AM
Here's one I had to learn -

MUCKLE - to get a tight hold on something.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Mike Fox on July 23, 2013, 09:01:11 PM
don't forget diggah. This can be several things. Someone who digs clams, an excavator, or what happened to you when you fell. "I took a diggah."
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Andre Anderson on July 24, 2013, 03:23:33 AM
I miss "Bert and I" ;)

Andre
Portland Oregon
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on July 24, 2013, 07:29:40 AM
One of my favorites -

UPTA - as in "we're goin upta camp this weekend". 

UPTA kind of reminds me of how we used to say "you goin downey ocean?"  In Maryland, "downey ocean" meant Ocean City as compared to a destination somewhere along the Chesapeake Bay.  A trip to a bay location was known as "goin down the shore".  Prior to the Bay Bridge(s) being built, many folks took the old bay steamer "Smokey Joe" from Baltimore over to Love Point on the Eastern Shore. 

Bawlmereese is a bit like Downeast Maine slang ... just not as much fun!
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Pete "Cosmo" Barrington on November 10, 2013, 04:11:44 PM
My cousins (all 52 of them,) who were natives of Strong in Franklin County, used to venture to the stowah to buy a sohdur.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Steve Smith on November 11, 2013, 12:50:15 AM
Stewart--from your earlier post:

Quote
WICKED - can be said at almost any occasion, usually followed by the words "big" or "good"

This is frequently intensified with "some."  SOME WICKED GOOD (or BAD, I guess, though I've only heard the "GOOD" form)
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on March 05, 2015, 05:40:09 PM
A few more translations are in order since these have come up recently -

Chuppta?  - This is normally asked when someone enters the shop.

Match -  The month that follows February.

Bah - The 5 to 6' long metal rod used to adjust the position of rail and ties.  This term will be used during next month's work weekend.

Mack - Another work weekend term as in "put a chalk mack on the tie where the first spike will be set".
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: James Patten on March 05, 2015, 06:56:58 PM
Not "Match" it's "Maaahch".
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Hansel Gordon on March 05, 2015, 08:45:23 PM
Not "Match" it's "Maaahch".

It depends on whether you speak British or not.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Ira Schreiber on March 06, 2015, 04:03:28 PM
It's also not "sure"
It's "shore"
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: John Kokas on March 06, 2015, 09:04:49 PM
And its Kitty-corner not Catty-Corner..........

As for learning "mid-western" speak, its "crick" not "creek".......

And for the true coffee-hounds, you're going to WAWA, not Starbucks - sorry not available in Maine (yet)

Hope all have enjoyed their "literary" experience for the day.   ;D
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Mike Fox on March 06, 2015, 09:12:17 PM
I could fill a page with all the sayings I have heard. Gawd Paw, whats fah suppah.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Craig "Red" Heun on March 06, 2015, 09:34:30 PM
I left my keys upta camp

Or gonna take a ride upta the WW&F to see what's in the dooryard at the house

Sorry I'm from away
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on March 06, 2015, 09:44:16 PM
Got 6 foot drifts in my door yahd.  Wanted suppah but had to go upta stowah for some cow.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Hansel Gordon on March 07, 2015, 04:14:38 AM
Sorry I'm from away

We could tell   ;D

  Wanted suppah but had to go upta stowah for some cow.

"for some cow"
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Gordon Cook on March 07, 2015, 02:43:04 PM
When I was a young pollywog on the southeastern coast of RI, I was convinced that a local family was named "Cotta" and that the local skating pond was the "Cod" mill pond. I couldn't figure out what a salt water fish had to do with a freshwater pond in the woods.

Also, if you were annoying your brother, you were told to stop "plegging" them. Anyone ever heard that one?
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Mike Fox on March 07, 2015, 07:37:52 PM
Yes Gawdon. Grandmother used to say that to me all the time
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Steve Smith on March 08, 2015, 11:05:06 PM
Fact about the entomology of Maine:
Maine has no hornets. It does, however, have hahnets. If you're plowin, it's not a good thing if a hahnet stings one of the hahsses.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Andre Anderson on March 09, 2015, 10:41:26 PM
I am so enjoying this thread!  ;D  ;D

Andre Anderson
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Bryce Weeks on October 16, 2015, 10:03:06 PM
theres also cornah or corner and theres shootin,huntin,and others of which i cant think of
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Pete "Cosmo" Barrington on October 16, 2015, 11:59:06 PM
That's "CAH-nah"...  ;)
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on October 17, 2015, 06:58:17 AM
Gad-nah

A town on the Kennebec ... or a person growin' vegetables.
Title: Re: Downeast Maine Translations
Post by: Mike Fox on October 17, 2015, 06:27:56 PM
Good luck with de beyah. They are awful hungry and tip trash cans over so loud you need to take a beyah asprin