Author Topic: Bryant Patent Switch  (Read 6059 times)

Ira Schreiber

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Bryant Patent Switch
« on: November 08, 2009, 01:38:47 PM »
I found this on another web site and found it very interesting.
http://www.dougsrrshop.com/bryant/index.htm

Tom Casper

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Re: Bryant Patent Switch
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2009, 03:56:27 PM »
He did a nice job of scaling it down.   Looks like a lot of extra work to make a switch.  Half stub, half point.  Plus extra linkage to freeze up in winter.

Tom C.
Later:
tom_srclry_com

James Patten

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Re: Bryant Patent Switch
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2009, 07:09:51 PM »
I've never been able to figure out how it all works.  Now that I've seen numerous closeups - I'm still not sure I can figure it out.

It looks like it can act like a spring switch, in that if it's set for one track someone on the other track can get onto the first track without throwing the switch.  And it looks like it's got a built-in guard rail.

Ira Schreiber

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Re: Bryant Patent Switch
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2009, 08:05:30 PM »
James,
You are correct and if you read through the text, you will find it can act as a spring switch and with the wood block, totally against the correct direction without derailing. But, it's a total nighmare for maintenance and snow and ice.

Douglas van Veelen

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Bryant Switch
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2012, 07:29:27 PM »
Hi,
I just joined and thought I'd comment on the 2009 thread about the Bryant Patent Switch which has a link to my web site.
When I first saw the RMC article, I wanted to build one. I built one in code 70 rail in HOn3 but the rail was too stiff for it to work.
When I got into Live Steam, I had to try to build one. A train approaching the switch uses an odd combination of point and stub switch technology. Since we are generally familiar with point and stub switches, there should not be any problems understanding this direction of operation. The same is true for the trailing point move through either leg of the turnout when the turnout is set for you.
The mainline reverse movement through the turnout when it is set for the diverging route is just like any spring switch.
The reverse movement from the diverging route through mess used the guard rails to guide the back side of the wheels through. The one wheel was lifted over the aluminum rails (in my live steam 7.5" gauge model) by rising up on a 5/16" square bar of CRS with a taper at one end (wood wedge according to the article). The flange rode on the CRS -onto the top of the rail and BOOM - falls onto the mainline rail!!!!!
Amazing piece of engineering. A LA Rube Goldberg.
Glad I made one to show how it works. I lost my job able the time this was built and was never placed in a working live steam track. I wish I'd been able to donate it to the B&B group.
Quite fascinating to see a fully equalized unsprung truck pass through this beast.
Doug vV