Author Topic: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?  (Read 13238 times)

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #30 on: February 15, 2019, 10:16:03 PM »
 It's what is worth  and maybe you'd think it's none of my business because I'll never be an hands-on volunteer but once the mountain  extension is completed  I think  the WW&F would be wise to consolidate for a few years what has been doing untill then before taking up extensing the line  northward or southward. 

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #31 on: February 15, 2019, 10:19:06 PM »
[Moderator's Note]
First, I want to congratulate everyone for NOT going political when discussing sea level rising. Let's keep it that way.

That said, if the sea level does in fact rise enough to effect our restored railroad (at Wiscasset or Head Tide or Farmington for that matter) we as a people will have far more worse things to worry about than a heritage railroad.
Ed Lecuyer
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ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #32 on: February 15, 2019, 10:34:09 PM »
For sure, but  there will be a lot of water under the Trout brook bridge before it happens .

Bill Baskerville

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #33 on: February 15, 2019, 11:46:28 PM »
Good one Alain... on so many levels... Darn, did it again...
B2

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Mike Fox

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2019, 12:39:27 AM »
Quite honestly, I don't think expansion will never be talked about. No matter where the railroad is constructed to, there will always be more. Some will be physical barriers (218 & Verney Dam) others will be paper barriers. We have just proven the paper barriers can be figured out and worked through, after successfully gaining the required permitting to install a bridge.
Baby steps.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

John Kokas

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #35 on: February 16, 2019, 01:40:57 AM »
As an Admiral once said; " Damn the torpedoes - Full steam ahead!"
Moxie Bootlegger

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #36 on: February 16, 2019, 01:44:26 AM »
I say: "Torpedo the Dam - Full steam ahead!"
Ed Lecuyer
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John Kokas

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2019, 02:00:05 AM »
Oh! Now that was good Ed!  If I can't find a torpedo can I just bring up a few pounds of Tannerite?  It'll be a blast...….  8)
Moxie Bootlegger

Bill Baskerville

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #38 on: February 16, 2019, 03:16:52 AM »
Now you both just blew my earlier pun out of the water.
B2

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Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #39 on: February 27, 2019, 03:36:42 AM »
This conversation went deep QUICK!  :-*

Mike Arnold

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #40 on: February 27, 2019, 02:11:29 PM »
I have to ask, how is talking about “climate change “ not political?? Just asking..
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Benjamin Richards

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #41 on: February 27, 2019, 03:50:09 PM »
"Climate change" is the most recent name given to a global geophysical phenomenon which is currently under intense study in the scientific community. It refers to measurements and observations about things such as average global temperature, weather patterns, biological trends, and the atmosphere, and specifically how these things seem to be changing more quickly or differently than they have in the observable past.

Plenty of theories exist about the causes of climate change, but these are not part of "climate change" proper.

Knowingly or unknowingly, some people use "climate change" as a proxy for other, often political, issues they care about. Some of them may be linked to climate change in various ways (and with various degrees of confidence), but none of those issues are "climate change" proper, either.

Philip Marshall

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #42 on: February 27, 2019, 04:00:10 PM »
Good answer.

Joe Fox

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #43 on: February 28, 2019, 12:50:20 PM »
Very good answer. I was trying to think of a good way to put it. But just because one party may press pollution more than another does not mean it is a political topic. But instead a topic everyone should consider and think of ways to do their part to pollute less, use less energy, etc. Although asingle person has a minimal impact, several can have a significant impact. Such as volunteers car pooling, building track with manual methods, etc.

Regardless of the climates future, our museum has a bright future ahead with plenty of potential and expansion. It is a matter of what makes sense.
Track laborer, roadmaster, general laborer, and much more.

Fred M. Cain

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Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #44 on: August 27, 2019, 04:40:51 PM »
Group,

I scanned through the messages in this rather fascinating thread and just wanted to put in my two cents here.
My two cents are actually this:  MAKE NO SMALL PLANS !

I would like to say that the ambitiousness and determination of you volunteers who chose to “take the bull by the horns” and actually attempt to rebuild a long abandoned rail line is what deeply inspired me and caught my interest in the first place!  I plan to make future contributions in your endeavor !

In my own honest, personal and humble opinion, the WW&F should just plain “shoot the moon” and make it a firm, long-term goal to rebuild the entire rail line as it existed when it shut down in 1933.  If we can firmly commit to such an ambitious goal, in the end we might not quite achieve all of it but we will get much further than if we merely make it a long-term goal to just build a couple of miles on the other side of State Route 218.

Reading through the thread, I was just a bit dismayed by the fact that there is not more consensus on how far to take this thing.  Based on some of the literature I’ve been sent (especially the last issue containing the history of the museum) it appears that you have generally good support in the local community.  That is very, very important.

One comment was made in this thread was that once State Route 218 is reached that that would be a long enough ride for the “average tourist”.  Maybe not.  After all, the Durango & Silverton is a pretty long ride and they have met with success.  C&TS is even longer and, as an all-day affair, that really does push the envelope just a bit.  But would the entire line as it existed in 1933 be too long a ride?  I don’t really know but I don’t think so.

One thought I had about crossing 218.  This is more a “paper barrier” than anything else.  The possibility should be explored to see if the MaineDOT would permit a grade crossing protected by crossbucks ONLY under the special condition that all movements would first stop and flag the crossing.  That would obviate the need for expensive lights and gates which could run up to around 200 grand.

I don’t know what to do about the dam, but hey!  The WW&F has some really good talent at figuring things out just like that bridge over the creek.
I would like to suggest that these issues are at least given some very serious thought even before the “Mountain Extension” is complete so that you don’t lose momentum once State Route 218 is reached.

Just my two cents. 

Keep on railroading !

Regards,
Fred M. Cain,
Topeka, IN