Author Topic: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?  (Read 5394 times)

Wayne Laepple

  • Museum Member
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,608
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2019, 06:01:33 PM »
From what I can determine, the Alna/Whitefield town line is just north of the curve in the Sheepscot River, perhaps 2,000 feet or so beyond the station. This is the location of the gravel pit that provided gravel for the WW&F track. As mentioned above, beyond that is all privately owned. Realistically, if the WW&F wanted to, it could continue on to the site of the Whitefield bridge, about 3.2 miles beyond the Sheepscot station site. Of course, that would mean securing easements from the abutters. According to Linwood Moody's map, there had been a passing track in that area.

Bernie Perch

  • Museum Member
  • Hostler
  • ***
  • Posts: 234
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2019, 06:33:50 PM »
I rarely enter into these "expansion conversations" but I am going to enter my two cents.  When the railroad reaches 218 it will be about three miles long.  For the average tourist, especially with children, that is more than enough of a train ride.  Even though I understand why the railroad is expanding north to escape federal oversight, I always felt it was the wrong direction.  To go north beyond 218 in my mind is a waste.  It would require expensive crossing gates, expensive road crossing (thick boards would not suffice here), and would be limited to the next crossing.  Beyond that would require another major crossing which would require the road to be raised and the fill replaced beyond that.  All this would add another five minutes to the trip (both directions included).  What would the attraction be beyond 218--more trees and a field or two?  If there was a resort or tourist attraction to be reached which would produce more ridership, then I would feel differently.

I have heard stirrings of expansion southward.  There are houses and 218 in the way with all the problems mentioned above with crossings, but to me would be the sensible way to go.  Theoretically, when the railroad reached Wiscasset, with proper parking and promotion, the passenger numbers could greatly expand.  There would be no need to build a trestle or have a yard where the original was located.  Just put the tracks west of the current wide gauge ones.  There would have to be a little filling on the mud flats with its attendant permits, but considering what the railroad has done up to now, it isn't insurmountable. 

 Looking forward to SWW and all the progress since last fall.

Bernie

Skyler Kimball

  • Gandy Dancer
  • *
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2019, 01:21:32 AM »
Well, if it the railroad goes south, it not only would help with passenger numbers, but would really put the Wiscasset in the WISCASSET Waterville and Farmington Railway. ;D

Bill Baskerville

  • Museum Member
  • Conductor
  • *****
  • Posts: 776
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2019, 02:14:06 AM »
... but would really put the Wiscasset in the WISCASSET Waterville and Farmington Railway. ;D
Well, one out of three is a start....
Wascally Wabbit & Gofer

John Kokas

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,012
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2019, 02:27:08 AM »
Bernie has a good point, how much do we gain from Rt. 218 to Head Tide?  Not really that much but a ton of expense.  If the property situation at Head Tide were to change then now it sounds more practical.  Going south solves a couple of operational issues with run-arounds and we own all the way to the Wiscasset town line.  The real driver becomes getting to Wiscasset - especially if the Amtrak Downeaster becomes a reality.
Moxie Bootlegger

Bill Baskerville

  • Museum Member
  • Conductor
  • *****
  • Posts: 776
  • Life Member
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2019, 04:02:43 AM »
Of course there is that pesky problem of a few houses built on the ROW and I am sure the school wouldn't like having the tracks put thru their ball field.  But there may be room to the East to sneak around that issue.

I guess perhaps over time a few volunteers will want to move closer to the railroad and buy up the houses and move them to one side or the other.  One can dream can't one?
Wascally Wabbit & Gofer

Wayne Laepple

  • Museum Member
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,608
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2019, 03:37:40 PM »
While the W&Q does own some of the grade south of Cross Road, it is my understanding there is about 1800 feet in private hands before reaching the Alna/Wiscasset town line. Next is getting across Route 218 -- same issues only more so as south of Head Tide. An underpass or overpass would cost millions! To my knowledge, the WW&F owns very little original right of way within the Wiscasset town limits. There are at least 25 properties from which easement or purchase of right of way would be necessary. I'm not sure folks would want the train rattling their windows. And in the village, the current parking project has new parking along Railroad Street next to the Maine Central and at the end of the street, barring the way to Main Street. Finally, whether you believe in climate change or not, the sea level is rising, which would necessitate raising the embankment along the bay. Are these huge challenges worth it? I don't believe so.

Joe Fox

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,065
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2019, 03:56:57 PM »
According to reports on climate change, the ocean waters would flood our location at 218 and the  Trout Brook bridge. However that is year away. Probably not going to be seen in my lifetime of another 70 years.

Also all of these things will be STRONGLY considered by several parties including the BOD before any plan is set forth. Said plan would then include how to go about executing the expansion, funding, expectations of benifit, etc.
Track laborer, roadmaster, general laborer, and much more.

Philip Marshall

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 563
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2019, 05:19:43 PM »
According to reports on climate change, the ocean waters would flood our location at 218 and the  Trout Brook bridge.

Head Tide is almost right at current sea level, as the name implies. If we're building for the long term, future sea level rise should be considered as a limiting variable for northward expansion as well as southward.

ALAIN DELASSUS

  • Museum Member
  • Brakeman
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #24 on: February 15, 2019, 05:21:09 PM »
   I can't help getting in my two cents worth on this discussion. I agree with Bill when he said in his February 13th reply that we have lots to do by then. But  of course it's no harm in dreaming. After all,those who decided on rebuilding the WW&F from scratch in 1989 had dreamed it and their dream has come true eventually.

Rick Rowlands

  • Museum Member
  • Baggageman
  • **
  • Posts: 104
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #25 on: February 15, 2019, 06:44:35 PM »
This is an organization that thrives on reaching goals, and I don't think we would be content to not pursue lofty goals.  Once 11 is built and 218 is reached, will the WW&F be content to just run what we have or will there always be a desire to set and achieve another lofty goal? 

I think the real uniqueness of the WW&F is the ability to achieve great things.  But what happens once all of those great things have been done?  Just something to think about.

Rick Rowlands
Chief Engineer
Jones & Laughlin Narrow Gauge Railway
Youngstown, OH

James Patten

  • Global Moderator
  • Superintendent
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,181
  • Loco for 6
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #26 on: February 15, 2019, 07:19:11 PM »
I think the real uniqueness of the WW&F is the ability to achieve great things.  But what happens once all of those great things have been done?  Just something to think about.

There's always Quebec.  Not to mention Waterville and Farmington.

John Kokas

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,012
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #27 on: February 15, 2019, 07:28:41 PM »
Maybe what we should do is to start saying that this or that is impossible and can't be done.  It seems when enough people become naysayers,  this group (WW&F) become the rebel non-conformists and get the "impossible" done.  Must be that Yankee independence and stubbornness.  Given time, things change enough for the impossible to become very possible.  Just ask Harry......
Moxie Bootlegger

Wayne Laepple

  • Museum Member
  • Supervisor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,608
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #28 on: February 15, 2019, 07:41:57 PM »
I am not a nay-sayer, not in either direction. But I do think it's important to recognize the potential obstacles that keep us from reaching our goals so we can start thinking about solutions. That is all.

Joe Fox

  • Museum Member
  • Dispatcher
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,065
    • View Profile
Re: How Far is the WW&F going to restore the new track?
« Reply #29 on: February 15, 2019, 10:07:47 PM »
If we want to take future sea levels into consideration, then the track should not be extended past the next curve, just 400' from our current end of track. At the route 218 crossing the track is 18' above sea level. (The lowest point on our railroad, and quite possibly the lowest point for us to have on the restored railway.) At Wiscasset the track was approx 5' above sea level. Noteably close to the same almost 90 years later and with mass reduction of the ice caps.
Track laborer, roadmaster, general laborer, and much more.