Author Topic: Mount Gretna  (Read 2279 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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Mount Gretna
« on: June 23, 2009, 01:42:28 AM »
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Mount Gretna has been converted from the pre-July 2008 WW&F Discussion Forum.
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pockets wrote:
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Any chance this Pennsylvania line could get "Honorary" status? 2ft gauge, passenger hauler with Baldwin power....
Greg B.

James Patten replied:
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I think I've heard of this line.
I've no objection to discussion of it.  I know very little about it.

o anderson replied:
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Mt Gretna was apparently a popular Chataqua grounds.  I remember reading a story about how a young boy became a railfan by riding a railroad such as this, and he later made the famous model railroad tourist attraction "Roadside America."
I believe they coasted the cars down the hill, which would make this scenic railway one of the prototypes for later "Scenic Railways" that were also roller coasters.
Here are some links if you are interested in the Mt. Gretna railway
http://www.mtgretna.com/community/mtgretnashistory.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Gretna_Narrow_Gauge_Railway
http://www.jiggershop.com/history.asp
http://www.jiggershop.com/gretnaphotos.asp
http://catskillarchive.com/rrextra/odgretna.Html

Mike Fox replied:
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I've been to Roadside America. A lot of time went into setting that up. Very nice place to pass a little time.
Mike

Steve Klare replied:
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It's kind of surprising that a 4-4-0 tender engine like the ones on Mt. Gretna never appeared on the Maine Two Footers. On the Franklin County lines they would have been great as pasenger engines: Farmington to Rangeley or Strong to Bigelow without any stops for water or coal.
Is it possible that by the late 1800s, early 1900s the American Type was becoming kind of "obsolete" and not really considered anymore?
I'm just picturing an outside frame 24" gauge Baldwin 4-4-0 with 36" drivers storming across the Salmon Hole with the Rangeley Express and liking the idea a lot.

bperch replied:
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In issue 12 of Short and Narrow Rails, there is an article titled "Maine Two Foot Locomotives that Weren't" by Bill Jensen.  Page 18 shows Specification No. 7039 for a 2' gauge American Type for the Sandy River Railroad.  There is probably enough information to put together plans for a locomotive is one is savvy enough.  Page 17 has a picture of a BEAUTIFUL 30" gauge outside frame 4-4-0 sent to South America.  If I was 40 years younger and had the money, some of those patterns I am making for #11 would be going into a locomotive like this.  This is one of the few times I become a real foamer.
Mal Ferrell wrote a comprehensive series of articles in the Narrow Gauge and Shortline Gazette on the MGNGRR probably covering all the known information and photos of this line.
I managed to tramp around the enginehouse area with Jack Bitner, Mal and others and also the junction area and the grade there seemed more suitable for a shay.
Bernie Perch

Glenn Christensen replied:
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In issue 12 of Short and Narrow Rails, there is an article titled "Maine Two Foot Locomotives that Weren't".  ... Page 17 has a picture of a BEAUTIFUL 30" gauge outside frame 4-4-0 sent to South America.  ...  This is one of the few times I become a real foamer.
Hi Bernie,
Thought you'd be interested in seeing newer pictures of the 30" gauge 4-4-0s  running on the VFCO in Brazil.
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Sparta/8579/ingles.htm
Best Regards,
Glenn

bperch replied:
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Glenn,
Thanx for showing the site.  I'm happy they are preserving what is left of that very interesting railroad.  It is good to see the roundhouse rebuilt and with a new roof.
Bernie
Ed Lecuyer
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