Author Topic: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?  (Read 6106 times)

John Kokas

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Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« on: May 09, 2009, 08:16:27 AM »
If one has been following the news, relations and travel / monetary restrictions are beginning to thaw between the U.S. and Cuba.  Will this create opportunities to see and (possibly) find some other acquisitions for the museum?  Road trip anyone?
Moxie Bootlegger

Stephen Hussar

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2009, 11:28:04 AM »
I dunno...I keep hearing that whatever is there is beyond help. But the truth is, nothing is beyond help...everything is restorable with enough vision, patience, and money.

Stephen 

Ken Fleming

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2009, 12:39:57 PM »
Think "Parts" for other projects and for spares.  Trucks, couplers, injectors, lubricators, brake rigging, air pumps, etc. etc.

Keith Taylor

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2009, 02:36:19 PM »
There are sights like this to be seen! It's not all shot. My friend Agustin Perez Prieguez whom I have met through an e-mail exchange, is a mechanic involved in keeping a number of narrow gauge steamers alive.
I suspect that boilers would be need to be replaced, as they would not have records of approved repairs, and they would probably not be code boilers. But even locomotives that have stayed here in the US and lovingly maintained have reached the point where they need to be replaced just from age.
Keith

James Patten

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2009, 05:10:14 PM »
Road trip anyone?

John, the last 90 miles of your road trip would be pretty wet wheeling!

Vincent "Lightning" LeRow

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2009, 05:15:57 PM »
Don't worry James, Think Hydroplaning. ;D
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John Kokas

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2009, 11:17:31 AM »
Hey James !  Ever hear of a D.U.C.K. ?  Thousands built during WWII and many still running around.  They have about a half dozen in Philadelphia that are used for tourists both in-town and in the Delaware River.  No switching of vehicles required.
Moxie Bootlegger

Glenn Christensen

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2009, 12:19:24 PM »
There are sights like this to be seen! It's not all shot. My friend Agustin Perez Prieguez whom I have met through an e-mail exchange, is a mechanic involved in keeping a number of narrow gauge steamers alive.
I suspect that boilers would be need to be replaced, as they would not have records of approved repairs, and they would probably not be code boilers. But even locomotives that have stayed here in the US and lovingly maintained have reached the point where they need to be replaced just from age.
Keith

I've got to agree with Keith!

There seems to be a perception that the Cuban steamers are all held together with spit and bailing wire.  To be sure, some of them may be - but not all of them.  In fact several of the lines: Mal Tiempo, Espartaco, Rafael Freyre, and Gregorio Arlee Manalich - were known to keep their locos in pretty good operating condition.  Even the others may either be restorable or useful for parts as someone else suggested.

Now are these locos well-used?  Yes.  Will they need boilers?  Probably.  Will they most likely require thorough rebuilds?  Sure.  But on the other hand, a rebuild will cost you about 1/3 of building the same thing new.  There has to be a place where these economics will make sense.

Now does this mean you shouldn't build a #11.  Of course not!  I'd love to see that as much as you would!  The same with replicating any other beloved two-foot locomotive.  You always have the option to build whatever you think is in the best interests or your organization.  But it also makes sense to have an stock of usable locomotives that are appropriate to the operation and could be used to carry the operational load in deference to some of the more "historic" pieces.  That's where these locos could fill an important niche.  One need look no further than the 480s on the Durango & Silverton or the Festiniog's "Blanche", "Mountaineer", and "Linda" to see the same sort of thing being done by other great preserved railways.

But don't take my word for it.  Pick up a copy of the booklet 'Trains of Cuba - Steam Diesel & Electric", by Adolf Hungry Wolf. (ISBN 0-920698-46-8)  It lists pretty much every steamer operating in Cuba as of 1996.  I counted 76 "two-footable" locomotives.  Most of these are outside frame Baldwin 2-8-0s, but there are also a few 2-6-0s.  They would look at home in Maine just like #10 does.  See for yourself.


Best Regards,
Glenn

Keith Taylor

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2009, 04:00:13 PM »
Here is another Cuban Baldwin

John Kokas

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Re: Changing U.S./Cuba Relations - Possible Future Trips?
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2009, 11:19:37 AM »
There are many wheel arrangements still extant in Cuba.  Although a 2-8-0 would probably to a little large for our operation,  a 2-6-0 or 2-6-2 would absolutely be prototypical.  As far as the boiler's go, measure it up and blueprint the thing if we don't have original print, and then scrap it.... Far better to have Boothbay or others build a new one and then let our own "shop" forces do the rest.  But as part of the discussion I think one very important thing we have all overlooked is finding items such as passenger & freight car trucks, bearings, etc.; brake equipment, and all the misc. engine cab appliances one can find.
Moxie Bootlegger