Author Topic: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil  (Read 9935 times)

Stephen Hussar

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2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« on: April 02, 2009, 10:37:07 AM »
Check out this 2' gauge 4-8-2 Henschel in Brazil... imagine this monster rolling through the Maine woods? 


Tom Casper

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2009, 01:09:26 PM »
Stephen,  It probably would have to use the woods as it couldn't keep on the rails with all the curves or light rail.

Tom C.
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James Patten

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2009, 02:43:57 PM »
Even seeing the picture I have a tough time thinking that Henschel built anything larger than 0-4-0s (Boothbay engines).

Stephen Hussar

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2009, 05:20:34 PM »
James, I thought the same thing...wonder what Jason and Brian would make of it...

Tom, I wondered if 56 lb rail would be large enough...

Wayne Laepple

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2009, 05:57:18 PM »
I'm pretty certain Henschel built standard gauge locos. As for 56/60-pound rail, as long as the ties are good, this little 4-8-2 should have no problems. I wonder if it had any blind drivers?

Ira Schreiber

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2009, 06:25:37 PM »
No problem on 56-60# rail. We regularly ran a 120 ton four axle diesel on that rail as well as 70 ton box cars. Divide the four axles into the load and you see the WW&F is not overloaded.

As for the Henschel, it was relatively light and with seven axles to spread the load is no problem. Every four coupled two foot guage locomotive I have ever seen has had blind center drivers.
Hencshel built many standard guage locomotives.
Bring it on.......
« Last Edit: April 02, 2009, 06:27:29 PM by Ira Schreiber »

Keith Taylor

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2009, 06:28:56 PM »
Henschell not only built standard gauge locomotives, they remain one of the largest manufacturers of locomotives in the world today. They built broad gauge 4-8-2's for Brazil, and one of the world's first "Cab Forwards!" They branched out into the manufacture of aircraft, and military equipment.
Keith

Eric Bolton

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2009, 07:50:35 PM »
A totally different level of two footer! I would have to say that if we were ever to have seen a locomotive larger then the 23 it would probable have been some sort of articulated arrangement.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2009, 07:53:28 PM by Eric Bolton »
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Gordon Cook

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #8 on: May 04, 2009, 06:19:30 PM »
The drivers on that 4-8-2 look suspiciously small, not very much bigger than the pilot wheels.
I bet they aren't bigger than #10's drivers.
Odd looking smokestack, and the cylinders look small, in comparison to the boiler size and length. Could there be a 3rd cylinder?
Are any details available on this engine?

Speaking of large boilers on small drivers:

"The #1014 Henschel 4-10-2 Overland steam locomotive, serial number 39047, built in 1939."
This website has some interesting info on Brazilian RR's including pictures of extensive dual gauge trackage!
http://www.pell.portland.or.us/~efbrazil/efs.html
Gawdon

John Kokas

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2009, 09:05:41 PM »
Gawdon,

Of all my knowledge of Baldwin export classes, I am unaware of any units being built with a compound steam system.  Can't say never but chances are slim.  Also if you look closely there does not appear to be any change in cylinder casting thicknesses across the profile.  You need this to accomodate the third cylinder and internal steam ports.

As far as I know, the only remaining Baldwin compound is #60000 which resides today in the basement of the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.
Moxie Bootlegger

Keith Taylor

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2009, 01:49:58 PM »
Actually John, Baldwin exported hundreds of Vauclain compounds overseas, where compounding was virtually required due to the expense of importing coal. At least one four cylinder Baldwin is on display in China. Also, just because a locomotive has more than two cylinders, it doesn't follow that it is a compound. There were many three cylinder simple locomotives built, where the loading gauge did not permit increasing the size of the cylinders. There are other Baldwin compounds beside the 60,000 still in existence. At this page you can see a photo of a four cylinder Vauclain compound displayed in China.
http://www.steamlocomotive.info/blogs/index.php/2009/04/08/baldwin-vauclain-compound
Keith

John Kokas

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Re: 2 ft gauge 4-8-2 in Brazil
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2009, 08:12:01 AM »
Keith, I stand corrected because I was not specific enough. (My Bad)  Yes, there were many compounds but what I should have said was of narrow guage export classes, specifically classes 22-27.  If you look at your references, these locos are all standard (broad) guage.

For the most part these classes of engines did not, on average, last long in service.  Just as with the Gresley A-class locos in the U.K. the center cylinder(s) & crank were a mechanic's nightmare.  Have a problem with no pit close-by and you were up the creek without the proverbial paddle.
Moxie Bootlegger