Author Topic: Joint Bar Spacing  (Read 5459 times)

John Kokas

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Joint Bar Spacing
« on: April 14, 2009, 12:17:25 AM »
Why does it appear that joints are in pairs rather than alternating per industry standard?
Is this a 2-footer thing or a "localism" to the WWF?
« Last Edit: April 16, 2009, 12:46:21 AM by Ed Lecuyer »
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John McNamara

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Joint Bar Spacing
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2009, 02:42:21 AM »
One other thing, why does it appear that joints are in pairs rather than alternating per industry standard?
Is this a 2-footer thing or a "localism" to the WWF?
I wondered about that too when I came to the WW&F; however, I believe it was common on two-footers. The reason was that paired joints cause a vertical bump, while staggered joints cause side-to-side sway. Since the side overhang of the cars is substantial, and the gauge is so very narrow, side-to-side sway must be avoided at all costs.

Mike Fox

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Joint Bar Spacing
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2009, 12:54:08 AM »
John K. and John M. and who ever else is wondering this. The joints are parallel to prevent the swaying of the cars. With such a large overhang on either side and riding on narrow trucks, the swaying could actually lead to the cars tipping over. This was also done on the original railroad. I don't know who discovered this, but it was used on most if not all two footers.
Mike
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John McNamara

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Joint Bar Spacing
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2009, 01:57:12 AM »
John K. and John M. and who ever else is wondering this. The joints are parallel to prevent the swaying of the cars. With such a large overhang on either side and riding on narrow trucks, the swaying could actually lead to the cars tipping over. This was also done on the original railroad. I don't know who discovered this, but it was used on most if not all two footers.
I thought my post said that.  ;)

Paul Horky

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Joint Bar Spacing
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2009, 02:51:18 AM »
Some where I think I saw in Moody's book that none other than George Mansfield himself specfied the pairing of joints. Been a long time since I read the Bible of the profit Moody.

Mike Fox

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Joint Bar Spacing
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2009, 12:39:30 AM »
Sorry John. I'll have to pay mare attention next time. I thought I read what you typed but evidently I missed a line or four.
Mike
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Joe Fox

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Re: Joint Bar Spacing
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2009, 11:13:07 AM »
Actualy, the B&SR was staggered. In some of the pictures, you can see that the rail joints are staggered. I think this may have been one of the many reasons why the B&SR had so many frequent derailments.

Joe