Author Topic: How's this for turntables?!  (Read 4532 times)

Stephen Hussar

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How's this for turntables?!
« on: September 13, 2008, 11:34:25 PM »
Lance Gleich took these pictures up at the Huntsville & Lake of Bays Ry (also known as the Portage Flyer) in Ontario. The railway is less than a mile long and has one of these homemade turntables at each end.

Thanks Lance!




Mike Fox

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Re: How's this for turntables?!
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2008, 03:59:36 PM »
That would work great for the diesel. Have to be a little longer for the 9 & 10
Mike
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John Kokas

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Re: How's this for turntables?!
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2008, 04:00:04 PM »
Maybe something we should at least look into.  Lot cheaper than a pit-style one..........
Moxie Bootlegger

Glenn Christensen

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Re: How's this for turntables?!
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2008, 04:33:27 PM »
Hi Guys,

Here's a nice video of the Huntsville & Lake of Bays  operation showing the turntables in use.  Its impresive how smooth and free-turning they are, especially when you consider the loco shown weighs 21.5 tons. 

You'll see it yourselves - the fireman pushes the loco around for part of the distance and then lets the table continue turning under its own momentum while he positions himself to stop it and lock it down. 

Here's the URL:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0JC4rGOvwg


Best Regards,
Glenn
« Last Edit: September 14, 2008, 04:39:11 PM by christensenge »

Bill Sample

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Re: How's this for turntables?!
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2008, 01:49:55 AM »
I have seen some similar sized turntables in the UK - I think they were used to move the old-style 4 wheeled freight cars - "goods wagons" in proper English - to various areas of the terminals.  Somewhere I have a video of it being done, using ropes and winches - any of our UK readers please confirm or correct me!
On this side of the pond, I seem to remember a small turntable in the late but great Colonie Shop of the D&H Railway, possibly used to move locomotive wheels / trucks around the shop floor.

Gordon Cook

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Re: How's this for turntables?!
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2008, 09:50:00 PM »
Hmmmm, VErrrry interesting!!

Looks a little tippy, though.  Homemade? Are they portable? Many questions, but wouldn't that be fun!!
Gawdon

Wayne Laepple

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Re: How's this for turntables?!
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2008, 12:54:33 AM »
Turntables such as those mentioned by Bill were/are common in locomotive and car shops, where they are used to move trucks from one track to another where an overhead crane is not present. There is one in front of the wheel lathe in the East Broad Top's shop at Rockhill Furnace, Pa., for example. In previous times, such turntables, usually narrow gauge, were often used in lieu of switches in foundries, breweries, brickyards, planing mills, etc., where four-wheel pushcars were used to move materials around. There are several of these turntables in the old DL&W freighthouse in Scranton, Pa., now used as offices by Steamtown NHS. They look like oversize manhole covers with flangeways at 90 degrees from each other.

jockellis

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Re: How's this for turntables?!
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2008, 02:23:35 PM »
Out of curiosity, what are the wheelbases of 9 and 10?
Jock Ellis