Author Topic: Lantern restoration help...  (Read 2585 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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Lantern restoration help...
« on: January 22, 2009, 03:23:51 AM »
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Lantern restoration help... has been converted from the pre-July 2008 WW&F Discussion Forum.
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Stephen Hussar wrote:
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This B&M switchstand lantern was in excellent condition before being damaged in a fire. It belonged to my dad and I'm wondering if it is restorable. Can I get replacement lenses? Should I have it bead-blasted, etc. Any advice would be appreciated!



mikechoochoo replied:
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It doesn't look that bad. Go here for Info http://www.railroadiana.org/lanterns/pgLanterns_Restoration.php
The lenses are available on Ebay. They are usually  either 4 1/2 inch dia. or 5 1/4 dia.
Search for Kopp or Corning
Mike
_________________
Mike Nix in Minnesota

mikechoochoo replied:
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I should have said the lenses are 4 1/2 and  5 3/8 inch dia.
Some times people list them as 5 1/2. Take your time and don't overpay, there are lots of them listed. I don't pay more than $20 each, and have found them at flea markets for as little as $2. Not a rare item!
Mike
_________________
Mike Nix in Minnesota

Ira Schreiber replied:
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Use a non-destructive method to restore the metal.
A recommended system is soda blasting. It uses bicarbonate of soda as the blasting medium. It is very clean and leaves the metal like new.
As long as there is minimal heat distortion, this should be a simple procedure.
Ira

Stephen Hussar replied:
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Mike and Ira, thanks for your responses. I'll get some lenses, and the soda blasting sounds good...I'll look into it!

Stewart Rhine replied:
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Hi Steve,  It was good to see you last weekend.  Your lantern was made by the Peter Gray works in Boston about 100 years ago.  The type was preferred by New England lines because the lense rings serve as snow hoods.  The B&SR and SR&RL had this type while under MEC control.
As to cleaning - There is a process used by restoration shops where they dip lanterns into a pail of lye for a few minutes.  The lantern is removed and a soda/neutralizing agent is sprayed over the frame to remove the lye.  Red Devil brand lye is often used.  The frame comes out clean and ready for metal work and paint.
Measure all lense ports as some frames have two sizes.  Your frame should have the same size ports all around.  The B&M probably had red and green lenses although red and amber were also used.  The bail (handle) should also be replaced if you want to hang the lamp from a bracket.
Ed Lecuyer
Moderator, WW&F Forum