Author Topic: 1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question  (Read 588 times)

Dillon rail enthusiast Trinh

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1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question
« on: December 24, 2020, 04:54:08 PM »
I have a question, did h.k. porter built any 2 foot gauge steam locomotives with the 1880s to 1890s design like they did for the 3 foot and 2'6 gauge?
Like these photos for example?

Philip Marshall

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Re: 1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2020, 01:27:23 AM »
I have a question, did h.k. porter built any 2 foot gauge steam locomotives with the 1880s to 1890s design like they did for the 3 foot and 2'6 gauge?
Like these photos for example?

Yes, Porter was definitely building two-foot gauge engines in the 1880s-1890s. Wiscasset & Quebec No. 1 was a Porter 0-4-4T built in 1883 as Sandy River No. 3, to cite one prominent example. However, the only surviving classic 1880s-1890s Porter 0-4-0T saddletank engine in two-foot gauge I know of is Merced Gold Mining No. 1 (Porter C/N 1896, built 1898) in Coulterville, California: https://www.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomotive.cfm?Display=1431

The old Porter catalogs show they built engines in gauges from 18 inches up, and the several surviving 20-inch gauge Porters from the Arizona Copper Co./Coronado Railroad are well known, for example https://www.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomotive.cfm?Display=27149 and https://www.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomotive.cfm?Display=1569

I understand the complete Porter construction list was published a few years ago by Kalmbach. I don't have a copy myself, but the data are available.


Dillon rail enthusiast Trinh

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Re: 1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2020, 06:48:40 PM »
I have a question, did h.k. porter built any 2 foot gauge steam locomotives with the 1880s to 1890s design like they did for the 3 foot and 2'6 gauge?
Like these photos for example?

Yes, Porter was definitely building two-foot gauge engines in the 1880s-1890s. Wiscasset & Quebec No. 1 was a Porter 0-4-4T built in 1883 as Sandy River No. 3, to cite one prominent example. However, the only surviving classic 1880s-1890s Porter 0-4-0T saddletank engine in two-foot gauge I know of is Merced Gold Mining No. 1 (Porter C/N 1896, built 1898) in Coulterville, California: https://www.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomotive.cfm?Display=1431

The old Porter catalogs show they built engines in gauges from 18 inches up, and the several surviving 20-inch gauge Porters from the Arizona Copper Co./Coronado Railroad are well known, for example https://www.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomotive.cfm?Display=27149 and https://www.steamlocomotive.info/vlocomotive.cfm?Display=1569

I understand the complete Porter construction list was published a few years ago by Kalmbach. I don't have a copy myself, but the data are available.



But did they built the 2 foot gauge porters with the 1880s and 1890s design like the photos I posted?
« Last Edit: December 28, 2020, 06:51:11 PM by Dillon rail enthusiast Trinh »

Philip Marshall

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Re: 1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2020, 06:58:36 PM »
But did they built the 2 foot gauge porters with the 1880s and 1890s design like the photos I posted?

Do you mean with a closed wooden cab as opposed to an open steel cab? Both types were standard Porter options, so I'm sure they did.

Dillon rail enthusiast Trinh

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Re: 1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2020, 07:14:00 PM »
But did they built the 2 foot gauge porters with the 1880s and 1890s design like the photos I posted?

Do you mean with a closed wooden cab as opposed to an open steel cab? Both types were standard Porter options, so I'm sure they did.

Mmhmm.

Bernie Perch

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Re: 1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question
« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2020, 02:59:39 PM »
It is possible they built a two foot locomotive to that exact design, but the problem is that with the locomotives you pictured, the firebox was between the frame members.  If you were to go to two foot with the exact design, the firebox would be too narrow.  When going to two foot gauge or 20" gauge as the existing locomotives in Arizona, the firebox was put behind the drivers so it could be wide enough.  If you are contemplating building a two foot locomotive to that exact design, it could be possibly be fired with oil or gas, but no solid fuels.  Porter built some construction locomotives to two foot gauge with the firebox over the rear drivers but it was resting on top of the frame and the overall locomotive was rather tall looking, not at all like the design you mentioned.  I corresponded with an individual that I have lost contact with who had a boiler from one of these locomotives with the builder's plate intact.  I believe he was going to build a locomotive with parts scrounged from a wreck site of an identical locomotive.  I wonder how far he got.

Bernie

Dillon rail enthusiast Trinh

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Re: 1880s and 1890s 2 foot gauge porter question
« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2020, 05:29:21 PM »
It is possible they built a two foot locomotive to that exact design, but the problem is that with the locomotives you pictured, the firebox was between the frame members.  If you were to go to two foot with the exact design, the firebox would be too narrow.  When going to two foot gauge or 20" gauge as the existing locomotives in Arizona, the firebox was put behind the drivers so it could be wide enough.  If you are contemplating building a two foot locomotive to that exact design, it could be possibly be fired with oil or gas, but no solid fuels.  Porter built some construction locomotives to two foot gauge with the firebox over the rear drivers but it was resting on top of the frame and the overall locomotive was rather tall looking, not at all like the design you mentioned.  I corresponded with an individual that I have lost contact with who had a boiler from one of these locomotives with the builder's plate intact.  I believe he was going to build a locomotive with parts scrounged from a wreck site of an identical locomotive.  I wonder how far he got.

Bernie

Oh.