Author Topic: Remaining SR&RL, BS&R, and WW&F rolling stock and engines still at Edaville?  (Read 21429 times)

Matthew Gustafson

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Does anyone know why did Edvaille sold off #3,#4,#7,#8, and the rest of the rolling stock to MNGM and why after Edvaille was a successful tourist railroad?  ??? ??? ???
« Last Edit: January 09, 2009, 03:03:30 AM by Matthew Gustafson »
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Ed Lecuyer

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That's a long (sad) story.

The short answer is that Edaville *was* a great place and well managed for many years. However, it came under poor management and eventually went bankrupt. The collection was sold at auction.

The majority of the historic Maine equipment (including #3, #4, & #8 - #7 came later) was purchased by Phineas Sprague who started the MNG railroad and museum.

(This is a greatly simplified version of the events, and I'm intentionally leaving out the politics, blame, etc.)

The current Edaville has no real connection to the prior management. They are doing a good job with what they have, but it is not the place it was back in the 1970-1980's.
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Matthew Gustafson

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Were engines #3,#4,#7,#8 still operating at Edville when most of the rolling stock was sold but before they were purchase by MNGM? ??? ??? ???
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Mike Fox

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I believe the locomotives and rolling stock were sold at the same time. They all came up together accept for the #7 which was left at Edaville for them to use, either part of the agreement or maybe even a lease deal.
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Bill Piche

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#7 was left behind with some rolling stock with the idea that there would be a continued push to revive Edaville in 93, 94, etc.

The whole collection was sold outright (much as it was when Nelson Blount purchased it out from under Walt Disney and Gene Autrey in the 50s) to a group headed by Phin Sprague when it looked like it would all be sold off peicemeal otherwise.
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Matthew Gustafson

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Does anyone think #7 should one day revist Edaville?  ??? ::) :)
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Mike Fox

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Transporting a loco the size of #7 can get costly. Luckily a lot of the trucking was donated when the collection was moved north.
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Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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I for one have no desire to see #7 or #8 return to Edaville anytime soon. I also have no desire to visit Edaville in it's current incarnation or pay the now prohibitavely exhorbitant price of admition they now charge.
It is in fact less expensive for me to travel to Maine, even as expensive as gas is these days.

Vincent "Lightning" LeRow

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Edaville in its current form is a twisted form of Atwood's once blissfull dream.  It withered and died under poor management and what grew from the ashes is a rather dark and shallow representation of what once was.  I think the management is trying, but they must have awfully little to work with, such that they cannot maintain low admision prices, steam locomotives, and wooden coaches.  we all know how much work and capitol this takes.  And unfortunantly a buisiness cant always justify nostalga...
« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 07:10:29 PM by Vincent LeRow »
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Bill Sample

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Edaville acquainted many of us with the Maine 2 footers for the first time.  Maybe it was not the best example of historic preservation, but it did keep a good portion of the remaining equipment at one location which may have helped the current phase of preservation. 
I wish the current Edaville the best, but it has nothing of interest to draw me back there.  I'll remember my final visit:  the day of Fred Richardson's surprise 80th birthday party, with special guest star ex B&HR #7, and the entire main line was in service.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Remnants of Edaville
« Reply #25 on: February 03, 2009, 12:39:52 AM »
Bill,  I have an Edaville DVD that was copied from a film shot in October, 1993.  The video is a complete trip around the original 5 1/2 mile loop shot from the front of the lcocmotive.  I've never been to Edaville so I have enjoyed watching how it used to be.  That was a pretty ride - I wish the new Edaville well but I have no desire to see the railroad as it is now.  I guess I have been spoiled by the WW&F. 

Vincent "Lightning" LeRow

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I don't think we spoil ourselves, just elevate ourselves to a higher set of standards. ;)
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Matthew Gustafson

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When was #7's last day at Edaville?
« Last Edit: February 11, 2009, 06:21:06 PM by Ed Lecuyer »
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Tim Hairston

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#7 was brought to the MNGRR I believe in late '02

Joe Fox

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A few of my co-workers at Conway Scenic used to work at Edaville back in its hay day, and they said that even they wouldn't visit it the way it is now. Now they are down to around a two mile loop, since the house's have been built near the old Mount Uran. Things are far different now from when they were, even in the last 10 years, Edaville has changed a lot. Let's hope that all of the two footers both in Maine, and Mass can stay going for at least our lifetime.
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