Author Topic: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos  (Read 4911 times)

Allan Fisher

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Re: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos
« Reply #60 on: April 17, 2020, 06:48:58 PM »
The Railbus was made in the SR&RL Shops at Phillips and was Standard Gauge.

I believe the chassis and motor of this bus wound up at Starbird Lumber in Strong Maine and was used until the late 1950s to move finished and in process lumber around the yard.
Allan Fisher

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos
« Reply #61 on: April 17, 2020, 06:52:11 PM »
This is the same railbus that is now restored at Clark's Trading Post, correct?
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Harold Downey

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Re: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos
« Reply #62 on: April 17, 2020, 07:11:04 PM »
The Rangeley has shades also.  There we have proof of both curtain valences with shades.  I think it makes the case that the rings on the B&H coach were probably for decorative curtains or valences like the Rangeley.    Do we have too much time on our hands, or what?  :)

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos
« Reply #63 on: April 17, 2020, 07:11:53 PM »
Thanks for the pictures Mike & Ed.
The RANGELEY photo is particularly interesting as it shows a more common style of coat/hat hooks and no sign of rings of any kind above the windows or under the luggage racks.
So I am thinking, knowing the RANGELEY was built at a later time, during the "Franklin County Consolidation" when the lines came under MEC control, the rings are something more common to the mid-late 1800's that had passed from style by 1900 or so.
I believe an umbrella or cane-style walking stick would have been more common then, as more of a fashion statement as anything, and would hang easily from the rings shown. Also, a straight-stick style walking stick could be passed through one ring to rest atop the next ring either direction.
I'm trying to imagine what else would be common to the average traveler of the time the cars were built.
AHH!! I can think of one other item, and that would be a coat hanger! In the navy we had long garment bags for our uniforms with a space at the top for a hanger to protrude. In a sleeper accommodation there would be more room for such a bag, or just an extra suit-jacket to hang, perhaps in a small closet, but on a 2'er day-coach, what you see is what you get! ;)
now, granted, hanging tour suit on one of those rings would obviously block your view out the window, but chances are your jacket would be considered more valuable than your view.
From the looks of the hooks provided for RANGELEY passengers, one could easily hang a hat, a suit, and an overcoat from the same hook and have a better view out the window. Time=experience=improvements. ;)
Now, this is all speculation on my part, but there are now multiple identified common objects that could hang from such rings that have nothing to do with curtains or bells. So there ya' go. :)

Keith Taylor

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Re: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos
« Reply #64 on: April 17, 2020, 07:13:52 PM »
Or...the rings were for hanging the Christmas lights!

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Gordon Cook

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Re: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos
« Reply #65 on: April 18, 2020, 09:09:43 AM »
Stirring the pot...

I still think a key clue is the two rings that clearly have something in or around them in one of the pictures.
They did survive to the 1940's when this fan trip happened, so they must have had a purpose. If they weren't used it might be likely several would have been damaged or lost by then.
There is a picture taken at one end of one of the coaches of the conductor and a train crew member (or zealous fan) which shows the stove, but no rings there?

To me it doesn't make sense to hang canes or umbrellas right if front of each window, especially something that will bang around as the coach rocks.
The round shape and orientation perpendicular to the wall is just wrong for curtains of any style that we are used to. Curtains would also be a high maintenance item in a day coach.
They don't look sturdy enough to hang on to, and how often would there be people standing? Was there a commuter rush into Bridgton? :)
They are at every window, but in addition there are hat and coat hooks that are not at every window, so it would seem that they are not for clothing accessories.
In one coach they are plain rings, while in the other they appear to have a decorative element added. While there are some examples discovered of baggage racks with rings below them, rings are sometimes used as a decorative and supporting element for shelf brackets. In this case, it's unlikely they would be simply decorative because they are separate items. But those rings under the baggage rack may be for the same purpose.

With all that said, I still don't have any better ideas.  But it's a good mystery and entertainment. Don't give up!
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Mike Fox

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Re: Arthur Griffin B&H 1940 excursion photos
« Reply #66 on: April 18, 2020, 08:42:57 PM »
I looked through all the B&SR books at the museum, and nothing new was found..
Mike
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