Author Topic: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F  (Read 2672 times)

Mike the Choochoo Nix

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2019, 06:06:20 PM »
When I was a teenager I realized that there were two kinds of people in the world. Those that said it can't be done, and those that found a way to do it. I'm glad that the volunteers at the WW&F have been the latter kind. Keep up the good work, and I hope to see you in October.
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Mike Fox

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2019, 06:10:33 PM »
Nicely said Ed. I will add that the good old days saw less volunteers per day than there is now. We are growing, and we need the help to continue to grow. So continue to join in the fun. Create more memories. We can do it.
Mike
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Philip Marshall

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2019, 07:12:47 PM »
(Anyone got more "old days" photos they want to share?)

I believe I've posted these on the forum before, but here are two pictures from July of 1990. That's 15-year old me in the blue shirt with my late brother Steve and, of course, Harry Percival (second picture, far right).
« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 07:31:25 PM by Philip Marshall »

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #18 on: August 15, 2019, 09:02:54 PM »
Wow Philip!
I never knew you went back that far with the WW&F.

The photos of your late brother remind me of another important piece of what we share - that is the ability to spend time with loved ones while volunteering here. Some of my best father-daughter times were at the railroad. Now my daughter is all grown up, living in China (the country not the town in Maine), and I have those memories to cherish. I think of her every time we pass along Albee's field - where the second photo was taken during the Spring Work Weekend in 2008; the first photo is from 2003, looks like we're on the ladder.
« Last Edit: August 15, 2019, 09:06:59 PM by Ed Lecuyer »
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Philip Marshall

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2019, 09:22:22 PM »
Wow Philip!
I never knew you went back that far with the WW&F.

The photos of your late brother remind me of another important piece of what we share - that is the ability to spend time with loved ones while volunteering here. Some of my best father-daughter times were at the railroad. Now my daughter is all grown up, living in China (the country not the town in Maine), and I have those memories to cherish. I think of her every time we pass along Albee's field - where the second photo was taken during the Spring Work Weekend in 2008; the first photo is from 2003, looks like we're on the ladder.

Thanks, Ed. I like to think of the things we build in this world (like the railroad) as a way of preserving the memories of people who were with us then but who are now gone, and as a way for others in turn to remember us.

Yes, I joined in the first year as annual member #40 (I had to dig out my old membership card to confirm that), but then allowed my membership to lapse a few years later when I was in college and the complexities of adult life became too distracting. Then I rejoined five years ago after a gap of almost 20 years with a much higher member #, which means I missed out on a lot. :)

Bill Baskerville

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2019, 10:18:58 PM »
These are the good "ole days".  There just hasn't been enough time since today for us to reminisce about yesterday, the 30th anniversary and annual picnic last weekend, the spring work weekend, or last falls work weekend or all the days and activities and adventures in between.

As a relative new comer with only about 13 or 14 years as a gandy dancer, it was the trains that brought me to Sheepscot.  It was the people who brought me back.  I try to remember that with each person that I greet, both the 'old hands' and the stranger who wanders in to look around mid week. 

This is our museum, all of us, young and old, newbies and old hands.  We are creating our own history and memories together while we recreate Maine's 2 foot Railroad History for all to see and enjoy.
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Bob Holmes

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2019, 11:00:38 PM »
Just as an aside:  the frog for the new ramp track switch was built by a small team using essentially the same methods as shown at the top of this discussion.  Jason was still leading the work.  We used the large air driven rivet machine in the shop.  Even as we grow, the old ways of doing railroading are still very much with us.

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2019, 01:59:22 PM »
Hello you all ! I'am very interested in that discussion and I'd like to get my two cent's worth in. On the 56 years old AMTP, it's by now the third generation of volunteers that runs the association and operates the railroad .They are very young.  The officers are in their thirties and the BOD is as young  on the whole. They  have the qualities and the flaws of their age. They are very dedicated, active and go-getting and all due to them the slow dying AMTP is now off the hook. But on the other hand  they have kind of made a clean sweep of the past ,which quite a lot of directors and volunteers of  the second generation has very much resented and a few of  them have quitted. I joined the AMTP in 1973  but  I'm not a volunteer anymore. Yet, I'm still a member and I back up  the association leadership and the policy that the BOD implements but I avoid giving them advice and remenisceing  too much about the "good ole days" over my monthly visits because they would not appreciate it. But when I read  your wise replies  and especially Ed's,  I'm quite sure that the WW&F will know how to handle the tricky moment when the eldest start to give way to the newcomers in order to keep the friendly atmosphere that rules the association for it is the primary factor of your successful,and already very long adventure.

Mike Fox

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2019, 02:08:29 PM »
I like to listen to those that worked before us. How it was done then may still be the best way to do now.. Someone else has already figured it out. Give them credit and run with it. Real experience is something that should never be over looked..
Mike
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ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #24 on: August 16, 2019, 02:51:58 PM »
I fully agree with you Mike. When I was a newcomer I did like listen the eldest  remeniscing and giving me advice and  most of the newcomer did the same at that time. Eldest experience is always interesting and listening to advice avoids  being in trouble. But I must say  the atmosphere was  anything but friendly a few years back on the dying AMTP. But it's a sad story and not interesting at all.

John Scott

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2019, 01:01:46 PM »
What Alain has described has happened and is happening even here, on the other side of the world. I suspect that it would be the same, everywhere. Generational change is inevitable and Alain's approach is very wise.

Young people don't know enough to ask the right questions to gain the knowledge that they do not have - but they cannot be blamed for their youthful ignorance! Only time can close the knowledge gap and the exercise of patience is a necessity, on all sides.

The cultural changes that seem to be leading to reduced volunteer participation (everywhere) may be the most worrying development.

Joe Fox

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2019, 03:41:59 PM »
Change is inevitable. In my 15 years with the museum now, I can honestly say that I may miss some of the times from the years when I first started, but looking at what we have become and where we are going our tracks lead to a bright and prosperous future. I have very much enjoyed the last 15 years with the railway, and look forward to the next 15 years, etc. We have amazing people, doing great and amazing projects.
Track laborer, roadmaster, general laborer, and much more.

Bill Sample

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2019, 07:19:15 PM »
I was up at the work weekend when Emily was helping out,  quite covered with Maine clay mud and really enjoying herself.  One thing she did was moving some rather large stones to the slope of  the Albee's crossing approach road and I'm sure they're still there if the logging equipment didn't disturb them.  I've mentioned that weekend to family and friends that I have ridden with on the train when passing that point.


Paul Crabb

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2019, 01:17:46 AM »
I have the same memory of Emily as Bill does. She was definitely covered in mud and clay that day and I think I mentioned to her that her Mom might not be happy with how dirty she was. Didn't seem tp phase her. Seems like only a short time ago and now Ed says she's grown and in China. Time flies.

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: Reflections on 30 Years of the WW&F
« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2019, 08:06:01 PM »


John Scott wrote
Young people don't know enough to ask the right questions to gain the knowledge that they do not have - but they cannot be blamed for their youthful ignorance! Only time can close the knowledge gap and the exercise of patience is a necessity, on all sides.
I do agree with Scott but I have known ones of the old brigade that were not too eager to share their knowledges and  knowhow with newbies  because they were afraid that they would do better than they did eventually and  they would lose their pseudo prestige and authority consequently. As Scott rightly mentionned voluntary work is on the wane , so it's a duty for the eldest to  kindly welcome and properly train the newcommers  especially the young that  are the future of everything .It' quite up to the eldest to make the newcomers feel like staying in the association and continue what has been started before.