Author Topic: More news from Sandstone  (Read 429 times)

Wayne Laepple

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More news from Sandstone
« on: November 28, 2018, 07:49:37 PM »
These folks are sending out news fast and furious. Here's the latest update. Note the boiler and firebox for the NG-10, a two-foot gauge Pacific. Also some cool photos of World War I "WD" locos in Great Britain. Be sure to check out the video clip under the "Road Steam" heading. It's simply amazing!

http://starsofsandstone.com/images/pdf/nov2018/Sandstone_NL_9_final.pdf
« Last Edit: November 29, 2018, 01:57:35 AM by Wayne Laepple »

John Stone

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2018, 12:51:16 AM »
That's really cool stuff! I didn't realize Baldwin built any of those 2-6-2T engines! I always just assumed they stuck with the 4-6-0T's, which seemed less practical for reverse moves.

Looks like the Baldwin sits a little higher than the Alco.


Mike the Choochoo Nix

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2018, 12:29:37 AM »
the 2-6-2s were designed and built by Baldwin, the other companies used their blue prints when they couldn't keep up.
Mike Nix

Dag Bonnedal

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2018, 06:31:58 PM »
Well, there are many variants that can easily be mixed up.
The French fortresses had already before the war the Fairlie/Pechot-Bourdon type of articulated locos. During the war most of them were built by Baldwin.

The British started in a haste by taking a standard 0-6-0 Hunslet design and lengthened it by adding a forward truck/bogie, quite original! But it was well liked, but way too few.
Ordering more 4-6-0 from  Baldwin, this company took a very similar design they already had for the French military lines in Morocco (one of the largest 600mm/2" networks, about 1300 miles!), simplified it and built it in large numbers. Not very popular, prone to derail, but Baldwin built a lot of them.
http://www.warofficehunslet.org.uk/  Hunslet on the right, Baldwin on the left.

The British ordered more locos from Alco, they came out with a 2-6-2 outside framed tank. Really good locos. After the war most found their way to the colonies. Only three survived in France (one now on Ffestiniog).
http://www.heeresfeldbahn.de/lokomotiven/england/alco_2-6-2t/index.html

When the US entered the war your army ordered more 2-6-2 from Baldwin. But they modified their 4-6-0 design and built a 2-6-2 with inside frames, not as good as the Alcos. A fair number of these inside framed 2-6-2 were built by Davenport.
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=41442 One Davenport preserved in Fort Benning.

The locos in the Sandstone brochure are one US Baldwin inside framed 2-6-2 and a British (LDR) Baldwin 4-6-0.

Baldwin also built a number of 0-6-0 saddle tanks for France.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 06:56:44 PM by Dag Bonnedal »

Carl Soderstrom

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2018, 01:24:18 AM »
Is the 303 Vacuum Brakes?

John Kokas

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2018, 03:43:52 PM »
I wonder if anyone has ever asked the Army if they would loan out their engine for restoration and operation?
Moxie Bootlegger

Dag Bonnedal

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2018, 08:09:37 PM »
Is the 303 Vacuum Brakes?

Yes, as you can see from the brake hose.
Here is the small and discrete ejector.
http://www.warofficehunslet.org.uk/restorationfiles/20170815ejector.jpg
The narrow gauge lines i Britain are very mixed these days with 600 or 2" gauge, air or vacuum brakes. Not very compatible.

Carl Soderstrom

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2018, 04:32:12 AM »
Dag

tack!

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2018, 01:15:42 PM »
[Moderator's Note]
A discussion of the WW&F's implementation of the Eames Vacuum Brake system has been moved to the members-only section of the forum.
Ed Lecuyer
Moderator, WW&F Forum

John Stone

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Re: More news from Sandstone
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2018, 05:50:17 PM »
It's interesting that Alco built the outside framed version, while Baldwin opted for the less-steady-riding inside frame design. I think Baldwin only built two inside framed locomotives for the Maine common carrier two footers. B&SR 6 and Sandy River 16, later SR&RL 8. Both 2-4-4t's had a reputation for teetering along in an unsteady, top heavy manner. 8 even capsized at speed, killing her engineer. I would have thought such history would have prompted Baldwin to really push an outside framed engine for the military applications.

Baldwin built 495 of those pannier tanked 4-6-0T engines for the British Government, 1916-17, weighing a bit over 16 tons each. They also built 280 of those little push-me-pull-me "Pechot" 0-4-4-0 lokies for the French, weighing in at about 14 tons, along with 20 tank engines of an American design and a bunch of gas-mechanical engines. All told, they built over 1000 60cm locomotives for the french alone! These totals don't even count the 2-6-2T's and gas lokies built for the American Efforts.

War is expensive in so many ways!