Author Topic: Fall Work Weekend 2018  (Read 5316 times)

Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #105 on: October 09, 2018, 03:59:16 PM »
Pictures going from south to north of the new track.



I see you got my best side in the fifth photo. ::)

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Mike Fox

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #106 on: October 09, 2018, 04:02:19 PM »
Jason has wanted to try off set joints. Off set by about 4 feet. The thinking is to get the joints off of one tie, so maybe they won't be so low and easier to maintain.
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Joe Fox

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #107 on: October 09, 2018, 05:01:05 PM »
We are going to try staggered joints on the Mountain in hopes our track keeps alignment in and out of curves better. This may increase the need for jacking and tamping, and we will keep an eye out for it. Our current track still has one side get lower than the other, so this may not have that much of a different effect.
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Christopher Dadson

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #108 on: October 09, 2018, 05:57:18 PM »
Someone else mentioned a day or two ago that the length of each rail is 28 feet. Out of interest what is the weight of each rail in pounds per yard?

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Dave Crow

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #109 on: October 09, 2018, 06:35:34 PM »
Chris, the rail is 60 pounds per yard. These were originally 30-foot lengths of rail, but with the ends cropped off to remove the banged-up ends from the original joints.

Joe Fox

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #110 on: October 09, 2018, 07:01:41 PM »
I actually think these were rolled out at 28 footers. We didn't crop that many of them, and I am not sure of any railroad that would cut each rail to 28' and drill them.

Now with that said, Dave is correct that the standard size for light rail is 30'. Once you get into 75 lb rail and larger they cone in 40' lengths and larger.
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Roger Cole

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #111 on: October 09, 2018, 09:54:18 PM »
Actually, heavier jointed rail is typically 39 feet long (to fit within a standard 40 foot gondola).  I'm going to make a wild guess that in the days when lighter rail was king, the standard gondola would be 30 feet so 28 foot rails would make sense.

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #112 on: October 09, 2018, 10:34:01 PM »
When I was researching the rail we got from Wisconsin, I was told that it had been "cascaded" twice. First came out of a Milwaukee Road main track to a branch line, then about 15 years later was placed on this branch line to upgrade it from 45-pound rail. I would bet that at one time or another it was cropped from 30 feet to 28.

Bob Holmes

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #113 on: October 09, 2018, 11:19:17 PM »
You can see beyond the EOT that we could not have gone any further. such as the huge dip in grade.  There is serious grading and tree removal to be done before we can lay more track.  Lots of opportunity for volunteers to help Mike over the next several months...

Philip Marshall

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #114 on: October 10, 2018, 05:05:06 AM »
Actually, heavier jointed rail is typically 39 feet long (to fit within a standard 40 foot gondola).  I'm going to make a wild guess that in the days when lighter rail was king, the standard gondola would be 30 feet so 28 foot rails would make sense.

Correct. According to John H. White's "The American Railroad Freight Car", the standard car length in the 1870s was 29 feet (for example, V&T flatcar No. 308, built by the Detroit Car Works in 1876 and now at the Nevada State RR Museum, measures 29 feet 8 inches), growing to 30 to 34 feet by the 1880s. I've seen mill dates of 1888 and 1889 on our rail from Wisconsin, so 28 feet would have been just right for that era.

Mike Fox

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #115 on: October 10, 2018, 10:26:47 AM »
Here is a picture from the current end of track that Joe took.

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Bill Reidy

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #116 on: October 10, 2018, 09:41:46 PM »
Wiscasset Newspaper article about Fall Work Weekend, highlighting the rail crane:

https://www.wiscassetnewspaper.com/article/volunteer-built-crane-aids-railroad-track-laying-alna/108635?source=fs&slide=1
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Ed Lecuyer

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #117 on: October 10, 2018, 11:22:31 PM »
There are several videos posted on the WW&F YouTube channel. Check it out:
https://www.youtube.com/c/WWFRailway
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Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #118 on: October 11, 2018, 02:42:15 PM »
Thanks for the link, Ed.

Jeff S.
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Dana Deering

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Re: Fall Work Weekend 2018
« Reply #119 on: October 11, 2018, 04:53:12 PM »
     What I like best about that "quadra-spiking" video is that the spikers are all 17 - 18 years old.  That's the future of the railway right there.  Let's continue to encourage these younger guys (and gals, if you're out there...) all we can.  We're building this railroad not just for us but as a legacy and we need "heirs" to carry it on.  There were lots of young faces at the FWW and it looked to me like they were all having fun while working hard.  What could bode better for the railroad?  I am still very much in awe of what the whole track crew, crane to spikers, working together, accomplished.  I'm still smiling about it.