Author Topic: Engine house  (Read 1332 times)

Dave Lamson

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Engine house
« on: February 28, 2018, 05:08:34 PM »
Has anyone thought about installing old-fashioned ceramic smoke jacks on the roundhouse when it is built? The ones that look like a bishop on a chess-board. They were popular back in the 1880's-'90's..........

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2018, 05:29:09 PM »
Has anyone thought about installing old-fashioned ceramic smoke jacks on the roundhouse when it is built? The ones that look like a bishop on a chess-board. They were popular back in the 1880's-'90's..........
Hi Dave
What's a smoke jack maybe you mean a stack or is it a pun ?

Benjamin Richards

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2018, 07:15:49 PM »
Alain,

Not a pun. A "smoke jack" is a funnel installed in the roof of the engine house to evacuate the engine exhaust gases from a hot or overnight-banked engine, to avoid filling the roundhouse with smoke and other combustion by-products.

I'm trying to find a picture, but apparently there's this BBQ joint named Smokejack that keeps polluting my Google search results...stay tuned.

While not the ceramic type Dave is referring to, these are pre-cast reinforced concrete type smokejacks from a Lehigh Valley RR Roundhouse in Ashmore, PA.
http://www.anthraciterailroads.org/lvrr/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Ashmore-Roundhouse.jpg

Concrete usage in this area was disproportionately high due to the large Portland cement industry in the Lehigh Valley. This may explain the usage of concrete for such a mundane appliance as a smoke jack. Sheet-metal would be a more typical (and usually more cost-effective) material.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2018, 07:41:09 PM by Benjamin Richards »

John McNamara

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2018, 10:28:23 PM »
I expect that the smoke jacks desired will be copies of those on the original WW&F engine house. Authenticity!
-John M

Joe Fox

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2018, 12:56:12 AM »
The plan is to build the roundhouse with operational, and non operational smoke jacks to make the roundhouse look historically correct as a mirror replica. Not sure the exact plan on how they will be built, but I can safely say they are a huge heat loss in the winter. Even with a engine banked overnight, the furnace pretty much ran non stop trying to keep the shop warm. Where we don't have a need to bank engines inside, maybe we could find a way to insulate them inside. At the roundhouse in North Conway the smoke jacks are covered up top when not in use, which is also nice to keep weather out.

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2018, 02:15:09 AM »
All of our smoke jacks will be usable (fake is a four letter f word- no offense, Joe :) but covering the unused ones is great advice, thank you. 

See ya
Jason


Carl Soderstrom

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2018, 05:58:22 AM »
Dampers are made for top of chimneys that can be operated from inside to save energy.

https://www.google.com/search?q=chimney+top+damper&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b

lots to choose from - or make your own.

Rick Rowlands

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2018, 02:17:41 PM »
Perhaps the material being referred to is transite.  I have seen roundhouse smokejacks made of an asbestos/portland cement board called transite.  It is nonflammable and rather durable, ideal for smokejack linings.  Unfortunately that material is no longer available due to health hazards associated with it.
Rick Rowlands
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Youngstown, OH

ALAIN DELASSUS

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2018, 03:12:30 PM »
Hi Benjamin

Thank you for your explanations. I  know what smoke jacks are. In Pithiviers there are two of them on the engine shed roof they are made of steel and I every now and again cracked my head on the funnel when cleaning the boiler top. I din't know the english translation for the French cheminĂ©e d'extraction or hotte d'extraction.I'll jot it down.

Alex Harvilchuck

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2018, 03:56:44 PM »
Perhaps the material being referred to is transite.  I have seen roundhouse smokejacks made of an asbestos/portland cement board called transite.  It is nonflammable and rather durable, ideal for smokejack linings.  Unfortunately that material is no longer available due to health hazards associated with it.

You can line with James Hardie soffit material. Works well as a Fiber-cement board product.
https://www.jameshardiepros.com/Products/HardieSoffit-Panels

Joe Fox

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #10 on: March 02, 2018, 10:41:39 PM »
The ones in North Conway, and the other active roundhouses and shops are just formed steel. No liners. Next time I am close to one I will have dad post a picture.

Roger Cole

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #11 on: March 02, 2018, 11:02:23 PM »
Jerry Jacobson's Age of Steam Roundhouse in Sugarcreek Ohio has smoke jacks.  Back when it was being constructed in 2011, they posted several photos of the jacks during construction and in place.  From one photo, there appears to be a damper mechanism in them to prevent heat loss when venting is not needed.  The link is below:

http://www.ageofsteamroundhouse.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=32&Itemid=144


Gary Kraske

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #12 on: March 02, 2018, 11:22:36 PM »
It seems to me that the objective is to ventilate locomotive smoke out without heating roof components, whether structural or weather resistant, to "dry-out" or ignition temperatures.  If wood is to be the roof structure then concern about long-term drying and thus lowering of ignition temperatures would be a concern if thermal isolation is not taken into account.

Gary K. Wondering what if?

Joe Fox

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2018, 05:07:02 AM »
Knock on wood, the roundhouse in North Conway was built in 1874, and never caught fire. (Metal shields were installed directly over the wooden beams to prevent the diesels exhaust from setting the roundhouse on fire, which was only an issue when an engine had to pump its own air.) The smoke jacks, although they get hot, they do not get extremely hot due to the large amount of air surrounding the smoke and jack.

Gary Kraske

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Re: Engine house
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2018, 07:01:54 AM »
Joe: Thank you for the explaination of smoke jack cooling via updraft air surrounding the hot exhaust.  It makes sense.   

Gary K U of Me. 1960 EPs worked in defense industry until 2003