Author Topic: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?  (Read 2199 times)

Bob Holmes

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2017, 10:42:34 PM »
Stuart, I like your suggestion.  As a relative newbie (about 18 months), I am always listening to the guys and gals I'm around.  Can't tell you how often I've heard how something was tried before and either did or did not work.  Another thing I've noticed is how often trial and error mistakes are made, and how promptly fixes are initiated.  That's how we learn and move forward!

Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #31 on: September 25, 2017, 02:05:35 PM »
Well said, Stewart.

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Joe Fox

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2017, 01:49:28 AM »
So in trying to find videos to show others how and why we build track the way we do a few thing occured to me. Not only is using man power when available faster than machine, but it brings us back to mind on the railways mission.... To recreate the original railway to the best of our ability.

However, what you are about to watch may be disturbing to some viewers. Okay okay, just our mechanical engineers. Lol. It is an 8+ minute video of building the Canadian transcontinental railroad and has sone very interesting track building ideas.

https://youtu.be/W9dOcTFN5R4

Although this kind of track laying is far more than we need, it is fascinating to watch. Has anyone at the museum actually filmed track laying? Online all I can find is ligning, tamping, and ballasting. One simply can not appreciate all the work that goes on during a work weekend, the amount of coordination amongst everyone from train crews, to track workers, etc. This past weekend was no exception. To all who plan and coordinate such valiant efforts as a work weekend, and keep most everyone busy deserve a pat on the back. As volunteers and guests alike point out, the amount of progress in a short amount of time is amazing.

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2017, 02:50:39 AM »
People tell me RowMow Mfg has one of those on the drafting table...

John McNamara

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2017, 03:34:30 AM »
It's called "MOR-ROW"  :)

Joe Fox

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2017, 09:28:14 AM »
I found it interesting how the ties are thrown down, then placed correctly with another team. Its a shame there are no pictures of the two footers building track, work trains, etc. I do remember reading somewhere that the most track built in a day was around a half mile.

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2017, 12:27:22 PM »
I do remember reading somewhere that the most track built in a day was around a half mile.

Challenge accepted.
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John Kokas

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #37 on: October 14, 2017, 01:27:21 PM »
What would a schedule look like if we wait on further track laying on the mainline until Mike finishes with ROW repairs on sections 2 & 3 of the permit process?  Would we be looking at 1/2 mile plus?  Could this be accomplished for the 2018 FWW or 2019?  I realize this would require a large amount of material staging.

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #38 on: October 14, 2017, 01:30:58 PM »
"I do remember reading somewhere that the most track built in a day was around a half mile."

On April 28, 1869, during construction of the transcontinental railroad, crews built 10 miles in one day, a record that still stands.

Joe Fox

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #39 on: October 14, 2017, 03:48:57 PM »
The WW&F's record was a half mile I believe.

As for FWW 2018, we hope to be able to lay at least 1200' of track. From the current EOT to Trout brook is just over 2700'.

Bill Reidy

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #40 on: October 14, 2017, 07:14:07 PM »
The WW&F's record was a half mile I believe.

Was that for the original railroad, Joe?

My understanding is our museum's record is around 1500 feet during a work weekend, done in the fall of 2001, when we extended the main from just south of the Sheepscot Mills crossing to just north of the new Humason Brook trestle.

Bill Reidy

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #41 on: October 14, 2017, 07:19:30 PM »
I should have said over the four days of the fall 2001 work weekend.

Although now that I think of it, did we lay more track in the push from Trask's crossing to Alna Center during the fall 2003 work weekend?

Once the roadbed down the mountain ready, we should be in good shape for the track building push northward.  We have plenty of rail with matching jewelry, and the ties.

John Kokas

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #42 on: October 14, 2017, 07:31:44 PM »
If I read Mike's posts correctly, with both permit sections 2 and 3 complete we are good all the way to the bridge.  I also believe he said we can't lay track in section 2 until 3 is done as the heavy equipment will have no means of access.  Did I get this right?

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #43 on: October 14, 2017, 08:09:04 PM »
There may be a few particular challenges in laying track down the north side of the mountain toward Trout Brook. For one thing, with an embankment on one side and a drop-off on the other, there won't be as much room for people to move around. Since not many trees will be removed, there will be some narrow areas to contend with. Also, Mike plans to do some ditching, some of which will be barely beyond the ends of the ties. And the grade itself will be a challenge, to make sure everyone is safe while equipment is moving materials to the work site. But I know that the regular folks will have thought all this through and will have a plan.

Russ Nelson

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Re: Improved Efficiencies & Mechanization for Track Building?
« Reply #44 on: October 14, 2017, 11:41:20 PM »
On April 28, 1869, during construction of the transcontinental railroad, crews built 10 miles in one day, a record that still stands.
Yes, and then they had to go back and rebuild it, because it was done so shoddily. They were getting paid by the mile, not by the usable mile. I'm pretty sure that the rails we laid Saturday morning for Mill Spur won't have to be redone. Lined and tamped, yes, but we were running trains on it Saturday afternoon and Sunday.